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pagan

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 131–155.
Published: 01 January 2012
... a Luther’s Attack on Self-Love:­ The Failure of Pagan Virtue Terence Irwin University of Oxford Oxford, United Kingdom Objections to Aristotelian virtue Luther’s Lectures on Romans...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 79–112.
Published: 01 January 2001
...Sharon Kinoshita © by Duke University Press 2001 JMEMS31.1-04 Kinoshita 2/26/01 6:59 PM Page 79 a “Pagans are wrong and Christians are right”: Alterity, Gender...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 1–12.
Published: 01 January 2012
.... Even if the pagan discourse of virtue had been adopted by Christianity in its earliest centuries, both medieval and early modern European thinkers continued to wrestle with the interface between divine formation and social formation and their implications for the character of human moral agency. ©...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2019) 49 (1): 137–167.
Published: 01 January 2019
... on the province of tragedy. Heinsius, in response, defended the historical and philological accuracy of his tragedy, claiming that Herod’s affects are represented to him in the dream as aspects of familiar mythoi, pagan and Hebrew, not as allegories but as mental personae or noetic characters appropriate...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 269–291.
Published: 01 May 2020
... distinguisher that is consistently employed to denigrate idols and idolators. Pagan antagonists are systematically identified as nonagential and material; by contrast, the saints communicate divine truth unimpeded and resist attempts to disrupt their highly integrated performances. The category of sentience...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 211–246.
Published: 01 May 2000
... of the period’s most prolonged meditations on the nature and meaning of historical change. The late medieval Christian writers whose work forms my focus did not erase the material signs of the pagan past or anachronistically modernize them with little awareness of their original significance. Rather...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 493–515.
Published: 01 September 2003
.... Rather, what crucially sets them apart is that one was a pagan and the other a Christian. But, what happens if we suspend the “pagan ” and “Christian ” aspect of their respective personae for a while, and instead bring these two men Journal of Medieval and Early Modern...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 85–108.
Published: 01 January 2002
... how and when the nations of early medieval Europe were converted to the Christian faith. In many cases, we are led to believe that the con- version from paganism to Christianity occurred immediately and sponta- neously as Christianity replaced the ancient religions and appropriated sacred spaces...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 7–35.
Published: 01 January 2010
... to the north. If there is something to criticize here it is the omission of Islam. Instead, Hardi- son accuses Chambers of “a pronounced sympathy for all things pagan” (CR 16) and an unfailing preference for their survival, which is supposed to mean that Chambers likes to disclose the pagan “essence...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 437–460.
Published: 01 September 2017
... specialized reading of this “parfit praktisour” (1.422) may be doubtful — as we will see, his tale culminates with a pagan girl making a remarkably astute, though problem- atic, biblical allusion. It is certainly at odds, however, with Chaucer’s own wide-­ranging bibliographical interests. Though...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 609–615.
Published: 01 September 2017
..., and even pagan cultural background; and to answer questions about genre, canonicity, dating, and authorship. None of the documents bears clearer or fuller witness to this than Bois’s Septuagint. For a start, the very existence and nature of the Septuagint posed fundamental problems...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 463–485.
Published: 01 September 2011
... all n o n - ­C h r i s t i a n s . 10 John Tolan has shown that these writers understood non- ­Christians to be either heretics, Muslims, or Jews. For these early historians, the crusaders’ opponents are “pagans.”11 They depict the Muslim enemies as venerating idols of “Machomet,” the prophet...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 257–281.
Published: 01 May 2009
..., already cited, in which he argues that a predominantly vernacular tradition existed in which salvation was to be proffered to all human beings, Christian and pagan, righteous and unrighteous alike. Watson calls his arti- cle “Visions of Inclusion: Universal Salvation and Vernacular Theology in Pre...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... to refuse bap- tism, to cremate the dead, to participate in pagan rituals, and to eat meat during Lent.9 Of course, other non-Christian religious systems, whether Christianity’s Abrahamitic siblings, Judaism and Islam, or the tribal reli- gions encountered through the invading Magyars (defeated in 955...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 387–402.
Published: 01 September 2003
... constructed. 19 They inherited the tactic from the gospel writers (e.g., Luke 24:22– 25), 20 as well as from pagan moral philosophers, whose talk of virtuous (“manly” ) women scholars are now inclined to see less as indicative of a belief in the equality of the sexes in achieving virtue and more...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 313–334.
Published: 01 May 2022
... authority should be used, whether certain pagan poetic forms should be practiced by Christian poets, and whether a decent, chaste poet could, let alone should, ever write an obscene verse. As we have seen, these questions were put forward in a lively polemic around the issue in several key Italian centers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 567–591.
Published: 01 September 2022
... advocating for the use of classical philosophy, as Kathy Eden documents in her landmark study of Erasmian hermeneutics. Erasmus followed Origen and Augustine in distinguishing the right uses of pagan literature from borrowings that might lead to idolatry or licentiousness. 2 This right use bears the name...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (2): 241–280.
Published: 01 May 2014
... by which they rejected the eclectic and heterogeneous phenomenon we call paganism for a monotheistic religion centered upon the redemptive act of sacrifice performed by a god who took human form for the sake of mankind. Christianization was achieved by a combination of spontaneous enthusiasm...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 181–200.
Published: 01 January 2012
... of poets to place their own opinions in the mouths of their great characters,” could hardly have chosen a more authoritative spokesperson for his views.2 One might assume, then, that Milton aligns himself with those Christian thinkers who, following Augustine, dismissed pagan moral philosophy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 517–536.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 33:3, Fall 2003. Copyright © by Duke University Press / 2003 / $2.00. their endangered history, but he also enlisted their help in the still pressing struggle against the forces of heresy, schism, and paganism. 7 Even so, Char- rier...