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origin myth of Britain

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2017
... fragments of the past, Elyot does not avoid uncomfortable reminiscences of the senseless destruction of past cultural objects. © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 Thomas Elyot Biblioteca Eliotae English Dictionary origin myth of Britain national identity...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 313–348.
Published: 01 May 2001
... Empire of Great Britain (1611) and the Colonial Archive Mark Netzloff University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Milwaukee, Wisconsin In a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 7–30.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Barbara F. Weissberger Anti-Semitic myths of ritual murder are less developed and more belated in medieval Spain than in northern Europe, where they flourished since the twelfth century. This essay suggests one reason for this difference: the presence and increasing importance in late medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 461–486.
Published: 01 May 2012
... economic motive. This essay considers how A View redeploys utopian literary forms in the colonial setting so as to envision unimpeded, accelerated “primitive accumulation,” that violent process of dispossession that defines the agrarian and imperial origins of capitalism. While The Faerie Queene adopts a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 241–280.
Published: 01 May 2014
... in Italy and the Mediter- ranean than in Northern Europe and its geographical fringes like Britain. The acceptance of Christianity in Lithuania, dated to 1386, is convention- ally seen as the terminus ad quem of this process.7 But recent work has mud- died the waters in a variety of ways: there...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
...” — in other words, Jews were secretly obsessed with blood, especially that of the pig because (at least according to one well-disseminated myth) the pig was the Jew’s own ancestor — the Jew was once a pig.32 Thus the stereotype of the red-headed Jew, with black palate, pointed ears, and foul...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
..., as the map itself explains, the names were provided by “the high and mighty Prince Charles, prince of great Britaine.” Indeed, it seems that the young Prince Charles (at Smith’s invitation) had simply erased the indig- enous names, which Smith had carefully recorded, and substituted his own...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
..., pilgrims, fairies, and eventually northeastern American Indian nations are feared or margin- alized; or both.4 Even now, the “Traveling People” of Britain are hounded by local residents and national regulations, and American voters without addresses are disenfranchised. But in certain forms this...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 289–314.
Published: 01 May 2016
... asunder when Margaret makes the sign of the cross. Margaret then faces a second foe — a black devil, sometimes identified as Beelzebub. Here, the question-­and-­answer scene from the opening of the legend is turned neatly on its head: the virgin questions the demon about his origin and evil works...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 487–516.
Published: 01 September 2017
.... Perhaps the most prominent among them is Christopher Hill, who followed Hobbes in connecting the Genevan exiles to the sectarianism of the next century and in setting the Bible above all other texts in the history of English revolutionary thought. In the opening of The Intellectual Origins of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 393–417.
Published: 01 May 2013
... and nonmembers, all of which, it is argued, demon- strates a mixture of agreement and profound dissent about the origins of the name “England” and “Britain” and about the history and character of England’s law and Parliament. By revealing the profound skepticism and doubt about the antiquity...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
... crowd at Middle Temple Hall.1 On this anniversary, the Globe Company granted the audience an intimate view of their “original practices” used in that night’s staging of the play: audi- ence members were given access to the candlelit dressing room where actors donned their costumes, applied makeup...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 293–316.
Published: 01 May 2011
... Perambulation, with one crucial alteration. Lambarde writes, correctly, that Kent is called by Caesar, and other auncient writers, Cancium, and Cancia in latine, which name (as I make coniecture) was framed out of Cainc, a woorde that (in the language of the Britaines...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 7–35.
Published: 01 January 2010
...-Darwinian, Darwinian Genealogy (MS 1:101 n. 3). Chambers came to this book almost without question through Alexander Tille, editor of Nietzsche’s first English translations and, at the time, “the most well-known living German scholar in Great Britain,” whose scholarship on the origins of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 523–557.
Published: 01 September 2008
..., in any case, is that the cantharis is common in Italy, as well as in Spain, the Mediterranean basin, and even in Britain. The duke may very well have tried the Spanish variant brought by Cimenes, but he was longing for something drastically new whose aphrodisiacal or topical powers he could...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 485–511.
Published: 01 September 2016
... John Calvin good night” at the Synod of Dort, a comment 490  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 46.3 / 2016 that reflects the obdurate and abusive character of the Contra-­Remonstrants at the Synod and after.18 In volume two, Brandt tracks the origins and exi- gencies of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2009
... Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 39.1 / 2009 after Cartagena, Florián de Ocampo recorded an identical myth about the origin of the Castilian kings.8 Cartagena cites Isidore of Seville’s Ethimologías, where Virgil’s authority is adduced to support the claim that Britain was isolated, insular...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 121–146.
Published: 01 January 2017
... performed again in her presence twelve days later.39 That the play appeals to Queen Elizabeth’s sense of monarchical duty is apparent enough: the story of Gorboduc from Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain warned “what might happen to a crown and a commonwealth without the 134...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 269–305.
Published: 01 May 2012
... feet with fish tails, and created mermaids. The following description, written in Britain or Ireland some thirteen hundred years ago, differs little from how we would describe mermaids today: 280 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 42.2 / 2012 Figure . Mermaid from the Luttrell...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 41–58.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Chronicle Rhonda Knight University of Toledo Toledo, Ohio In his Chronicle, completed in 1338, Robert Mannyng of Brunne narrates the legendary events concerning Stonehenge’s relocation to Britain during the reign of...