1-20 of 56 Search Results for

noble Italian women and gender

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 79–101.
Published: 01 January 2015
... convents, usually ones with no family connections, demonstrating a preference for postmortem association not with family but with a community of celibate women. © 2015 by Duke University Press 2015 noble Italian women and gender death and burial early modern wills and inheritance...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 213–250.
Published: 01 May 2001
... vernacular that “the religiosae mulieres were in large major- ity without higher education and mastered only their mother tongue. They spoke German, Dutch, English, French, Italian, and if they were to be spo- ken to, it had to be in these idioms.”5 It is precisely this kind of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 63–100.
Published: 01 January 2000
... Europe, second Kittell and Queller / Town Ordinances of Douai 65 JMEMS30.1-04-Kittell.63-100 12/21/99 4:33 PM Page 66 only to northern Italy. But whereas Italian cities could draw on the corpus of Roman law for the regulation of civic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 79–112.
Published: 01 January 2001
... Early Modern Studies / 31.1 / 2001 JMEMS31.1-04 Kinoshita 2/26/01 6:59 PM Page 87 Aquitainians, Italians, Dacians, Apulians, Iberians, Bretons, Greeks, and Armenians? If any Breton or Teuton wished to question me, I could neither understand...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
... literary and rhetorical, gender. The gendering of fluidity and, in Italian,influenza cast the American people as socially female: propertyless, wandering, psychically, medically, and spiritu- ally porous, illiterate, irrational, “unarmed,” lawless, and given to various forms of illegitimate...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2006) 36 (2): 397–453.
Published: 01 May 2006
... succinctly summarized by the Italian proverb “o marito o muro” [a husband or a wall].13 Meanwhile, as university culture tightens its grip, professional functions that had fallen to women come first under masculine surveillance and then under masculine control. Giles of Rome, who went on to become a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 79–104.
Published: 01 January 2018
... were other male midwifery writers, Mercurio nonetheless reflects an alter- native voice. In the century and half after Vesalius, both Mercurio’s text and the widespread resistance of Italian midwives to greater regulation of their practice are reflective of the ways in which gender and anatomy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
... dissections became more common from the time of Mondino de Liuzzi, who taught at the University of Bologna in the early fourteenth century and was the first instructor known to systematically dissect a human body in a public dem- onstration.7 Additionally, Italian medical writers composed at least...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (3): 483–509.
Published: 01 September 2009
... by char- acteristics common to other Italian cities, where competition was spurred on by the proximity of other production centers, and technical innovations were facilitated by the movements of artisans as well as by guilds that were attuned to changes in demand.6 Indeed, as I will show, some...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (1): 141–159.
Published: 01 January 2021
...); J. K. Hyde, Italian Pilgrim Literature in the Late Middle Ages, Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 72, no. 3 (1990): 13 34; and Daniel K. Connolly, Imagined Pilgrimage in the Itinerary Maps of Matthew Paris, Art Bulletin 81, no. 4 (1999): 598 622. Beebe / The Meaning of Imagined Pilgrimage...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... impure women and Jewish men, and believed to be a carrier of the disease. The perceived threat of leprous blood to Christian bodily integrity was played out in atropaic social rituals and in widespread defamations against lepers, women, and Jews as devourers or cannibals. This study claims that such...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2017
... Zemon Davis, Fiction in the Archives: Pardon Tales and Their Tellers in Sixteenth-­Century France (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1987). 7 See Francesca Trivellato, “Is There a Future for Italian Microhistory in the Age of Global History California Italian Studies 2, no...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (3): 539–566.
Published: 01 September 2012
... the evidence in these Carmelite papers that the nuns necessarily experienced time in distinctly gendered ways.36 There are, though, rare but striking references to markers of women’s biological time: to menstruation and to menopause. One set of papers mentions the “months” of Ursula of All...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 635–657.
Published: 01 September 2011
... traduzione, vol. 25. Firenze: SISMEL: Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2010. vi, 392 pp. Paper eur 51.00. [Latin text with facing-­page Italian translation.] Dalby, Andrew, trans. and ed. Geoponika: Farm Work; A Modern Transla- tion of the Roman and Byzantine Farming Handbook. Totnes, Devon: Pros- pect Books...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... strategy by Hrotsvit’s near con- temporary historiographer of Otto’s reign, the Italian Luitprand of Cremona (d. 972). In his colorful account of an ill-fated diplomatic mission to Constantinople on Otto’s behalf, he pokes fun at the Byzantine emperor Nicephorus in a ditty that addresses...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (3): 511–544.
Published: 01 September 2009
... says, that the increase in travel throughout Europe can have positive effects, as in the case of German noble- men who have learned how to dress elegantly at Italian courts: The clothing of German princes and lords consists of a velvet cap, not very high, with different-colored...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 393–418.
Published: 01 May 2007
... insisted that Marie had engaged in extramarital liaisons with her Italian favorites, echoing charges against Marie-Antoinette in the libertine literature.86 Marie-Antoinette became the heir of all these women by proximity and presumptive imitation. How this could be manufactured is evident in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 197–218.
Published: 01 January 2010
..., 225 pp. $44.95. Ray, Meredith K. Writing Gender in Women’s Letter Collections of the Italian Renaissance. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2009. x, 362 pp. $75.00. Scheck, Helene. Reform and Resistance: Formations of Female Subjectivity in Early Medieval Ecclesiastical Culture. SUNY Series...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (1): 1–14.
Published: 01 January 2008
... of edu- cation and literacy, technological innovation, economics, literature and rhet- oric, gender, sexuality, and marriage. One story cannot be told fully without reference to others. The same men who forged the canon of medieval and early modern Italian literature helped to orchestrate...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 41–62.
Published: 01 January 2000
...: Medicine, Science, and Culture (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), 224–25; Patricia Simons, “Lesbian (In)Visibility in Italian Renaissance Culture,” Journal of Homosexuality 27 (1994): 81–122; Mary Lindemann, “Die Jungfer Heinrich...