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nietzsche

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 7–35.
Published: 01 January 2010
..., owing to Hardison's symptomatic and crypto-religious misconception of Darwin. Chambers's evolutionary framework derives equally from Nietzsche (in particular, his concept of genealogy), and this nineteenth-century inheritance is something to embrace rather than piously castigate. A truly “Darwinian...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 453–467.
Published: 01 September 2007
... charge.”5 For novelty is the essence of modernity. It is around the possibil- ity of a spontaneously generated new, with no connection to the past, that its existence as a period concept has depended. It can be seen to emerge in Nietzsche’s essay, “On the Uses and Disadvantages of History...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 373–400.
Published: 01 May 2010
... eye of God to encompass such divisions. This secular sense finds its full expression much later, in Friedrich Nietzsche. When Nietzsche declares in The Genealogy of Morals that man has been bred “with the right to make promises,” but also that because man “dares” to make promises, he breaks...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 449–462.
Published: 01 September 2000
... are metropolitan twins. Their historical coexistence can help us to understand some paradoxes con- stitutive of Foucault’s genealogical method and his periodization of the his- tory of sexuality. In his famous essay, “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History,” Fou- cault...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 225–226.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Contemporary literary criticism has been decisively shaped by the herme- neutics of suspicion in its various forms. The situation today is thus very different from that pertaining twenty years ago in medieval and early mod- ern studies. Writing that draws explicitly on Freud and Lacan, Nietzsche...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 687–688.
Published: 01 September 2001
... that draws explicitly on Freud and Lacan, Nietzsche and Foucault, de Mann and Derrida, Marx and post-Marxist analysis of ide- ologies pervades our journals. Everywhere we are trained and training our students to analyze the subtle flows of power and the complex forms of ide- ology with their legitimations...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 441–442.
Published: 01 May 2001
... very different from that pertaining twenty years ago in medieval and early mod- ern studies. Writing that draws explicitly on Freud and Lacan, Nietzsche and Foucault, de Mann and Derrida, Marx and post-Marxist analysis of ide- ologies pervades our journals...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 167–198.
Published: 01 January 2002
..., “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History,” Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews, ed. Donald F. Bouchard, trans. Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1977), 148. On Foucault and the body, see Judith Butler, “Foucault and the Paradox...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 251–291.
Published: 01 May 2011
... lies in precisely this constant possibility of mourning the death of the friend (even before the friend has died), and he illustrates this idea of friendship-­sans-­friend by evoking and playing with a reference to Nietzsche’s allusion to Montaigne’s allusion to a perplexing, yet incisive...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (1): 57–78.
Published: 01 January 2008
..., 1991), 203  –  19. Bourdieu is drawing on Nietzsche’s discussion in his Antichrist about the relationship between priesthood and the constitution of the Christian commu- nity. In a book-in-progress on literary diplomacy, I explore this notion in more detail than I can offer here. 10...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 215–239.
Published: 01 May 2003
..., trans. D. W. Robertson (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1958), 93. 7 Paul de Man, Allegories of Reading: Figural Language in Rousseau, Nietzsche, Rilke, and Proust (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1979), 77. 8 J. Hillis Miller, The Ethics of Reading (New York: Columbia University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 367–393.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., no. 27 (Winter 1983): 45 – 54, at 53. 34 Literary theorists such as Paul de Man and J. Hillis Miller likewise read the story of Pygmalion as an allegory of figuration. Paul de Man, Allegories of Reading: Figural Language in Rousseau, Nietzsche, Rilke, and Proust (New Haven, Conn.: Yale...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 603–628.
Published: 01 September 2016
... deterioration (Taine, Burckhardt, Nietzsche), or of a pseudo-­scientific stadial historiography (Spengler, Toynbee). Now, Gregory’s The Unintended Refor- mation appears to present us with an argument at once sharply critical of the course of modernity after the Reformation yet premised on modernity’s axi...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 17–43.
Published: 01 January 2014
... in clas- sical and Christian philosophy and did not end there: “Wo es war, soll ich werden.” The opposition to it has been no less enduring, from Callicles through Nietzsche through Deleuze, which urges that this hierarchical vision of the soul — reason on top, passions down below — is a bad-­faith...