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national identity

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 161–181.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Brian C. Lockey Aphra Behns' The Rover harks back to an earlier period of intense Anglo-Spanish rivalry in which the iconography surrounding Queen Elizabeth played a central role. But the play also moves past nostalgia for late-sixteenth-century narratives of English national identity to a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 393–417.
Published: 01 May 2013
... positions emerged concerning English institutions and national identity. This article argues that these various renderings of English ancient constitutionalism reveal a protean and heightened sense of England’s juridical past. It contextualizes these divergent narratives in the identity crisis engendered by...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 403–412.
Published: 01 September 2008
... tradition; the neglect of nonacademic sources such as the written records of patients or the recorded comments of ordinary citizens; the relationship of disease to the constitution of civic communities; the function of disease in the defining of national identities; the representation of disease in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2017
... fragments of the past, Elyot does not avoid uncomfortable reminiscences of the senseless destruction of past cultural objects. © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 Thomas Elyot Biblioteca Eliotae English Dictionary origin myth of Britain national identity...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 41–58.
Published: 01 January 2002
... the Chronicle takes on an additional, undifferentiated identity, especially within Mannyng’s representation of imperialism. This slipperiness between the meanings of Englishness results in a text that supports one English identity in the domestic sphere and another in the national sphere.9...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 347–371.
Published: 01 May 2010
... Janus at the end of the dream vision, is marked by continuity and inclusiveness; it resists reduction or separation into units of time, nation, language, or even artistic medium. Identity for the laureate is thus not defined exclusively in terms of a status gained as a reward for past literary...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 95–146.
Published: 01 January 2004
...? And to what effect? This essay answers these questions discursively and cul- minates in a discussion of the Ruthwell and Bewcastle monuments that con- siders style in terms of ideology. My intention is to show how national identity in eighth-century Northumbria—ideas about dominion and gender, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 23–45.
Published: 01 January 2003
...Andrew S. Jacobs © by Duke University Press 2003 The Remains of the Jew: Imperial Christian Identity in the Late Ancient Holy Land Andrew S. Jacobs...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 145–166.
Published: 01 January 2002
...- thèque Nationale in Paris—reveals the pattern of appropriation I have identified, whereby a noticeable number (perhaps five percent) of manu- Ashley / Family Identity in Books of Hours 147 script Books of Hours become repositories of family data, most often start- ing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 197–228.
Published: 01 May 2008
... the East were in the later medieval period, especially of the biblical and the crusaders’ East, and how easily such images could be put to local uses, particularly concerning the touchy matter of origins and (ethnic or national) self-identity. My concern, in other words, is with the local...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 79–112.
Published: 01 January 2001
... nationalité française.” At this moment of national humiliation, the poem’s incantatory evocation of “sweet France” (“douce France”) and its glorification of heroism and sacrifice provided historical roots for the French sense of identity.4 The immediate target of this nation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 359–390.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Katarzyna Lecky This essay shows that small-format cartography of the English Renaissance fostered a geographical imagination that placed nonelites at the heart of the nation's collective identity. Cheap maps, guides, and atlases — a staple of the popular print market — were public forms of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2010
...Sarah Beckwith; James Simpson The deepest periodic division in English literary history is between the “medieval” and the “early modern,” not least because the cultural investments in maintaining that division are exceptionally powerful. Narratives of national and religious identity and freedom; of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
...- logical effect. It strengthened the sense of both local and national identity 58  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 43.1 / 2013 at the expense of an identity based on dynastic loyalty.”33 In Tamburlaine and perhaps in The Jew of Malta, then, Marlowe engaged with the ability of maps...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 473–485.
Published: 01 September 2013
.... Yet precisely because the master craftsman’s identity was localized, dependent upon recognition by peers and neighbors, premodern artisans often imagi- natively constructed their relations to the nation. In the fourteenth century, the brothers of the London Bowercraft censured the bowstrings of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 283–303.
Published: 01 May 2009
... English romance narrative wandered from locus to locus, in this case from manuscript to manuscript, with each encounter inscribing on it a different identity with characteristics influenced by local cultural values. Stemmatics' analogy of the family tree thus enforces an artificially unified reading of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 521–544.
Published: 01 September 2013
... ownership marks in manuscripts and a study of wills and book inventories, a distinct artisanal devotional culture can be reconstructed, as it becomes visible in the ways that artisans combined their social, vocational, and religious identities. This is also testified by the artisans’ appropriation of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 255–277.
Published: 01 May 2017
.... Long before large, muscled male bodies were popularized in 1980s and 1990s action cinema, these medieval texts foreground the necessity of building muscular bodies to knightly identity, while simultaneously describing them through a rhetoric of hardness that characterized their envisioned use as...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 443–465.
Published: 01 September 2008
... do not fall sick. We can see a new sense of identity being created out of the contemporary medico- environmental imagination. The link between people and place that in the early modern period shaped a constitutional and national identity was being reconceptualized. For both Higginson and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 119–141.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Jacques Lezra The prevailing anthropological understanding of mimesis, this essay argues, is inadequate to the study of early modern cultural exchange, in particular of the ways in which literary cultures imagine themselves in the lexicons provided by other national traditions. The idiom of...