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national identity

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (1): 161–181.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Brian C. Lockey Aphra Behns' The Rover harks back to an earlier period of intense Anglo-Spanish rivalry in which the iconography surrounding Queen Elizabeth played a central role. But the play also moves past nostalgia for late-sixteenth-century narratives of English national identity...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 393–417.
Published: 01 May 2013
... positions emerged concerning English institutions and national identity. This article argues that these various renderings of English ancient constitutionalism reveal a protean and heightened sense of England’s juridical past. It contextualizes these divergent narratives in the identity crisis engendered...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 403–412.
Published: 01 September 2008
... tradition; the neglect of nonacademic sources such as the written records of patients or the recorded comments of ordinary citizens; the relationship of disease to the constitution of civic communities; the function of disease in the defining of national identities; the representation of disease...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
... argues that “the cartographic representation of England did have an ideo- logical effect. It strengthened the sense of both local and national identity 58  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 43.1 / 2013 at the expense of an identity based on dynastic loyalty.”33 In Tamburlaine...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2010
...Sarah Beckwith; James Simpson The deepest periodic division in English literary history is between the “medieval” and the “early modern,” not least because the cultural investments in maintaining that division are exceptionally powerful. Narratives of national and religious identity and freedom...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 359–390.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Katarzyna Lecky This essay shows that small-format cartography of the English Renaissance fostered a geographical imagination that placed nonelites at the heart of the nation's collective identity. Cheap maps, guides, and atlases — a staple of the popular print market — were public forms...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 473–485.
Published: 01 September 2013
... that of knights, was cast as protecting the entire nation; through their collective identity, the bowers articulated a sense of national belonging. Even during a long period marked by increasing polarization between artisans and merchants, the identities of these two groups contin- ued to overlap...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2017
... fragments of the past, Elyot does not avoid uncomfortable reminiscences of the senseless destruction of past cultural objects. Thomas Elyot Biblioteca Eliotae English Dictionary origin myth of Britain national identity © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 543–570.
Published: 01 September 2002
... Nation . . . from another.”5 In the early modern period, national identification could be negotiated and made clear by the visible medium of clothing. At the same time, however, as Jonson’s epigram also underscores, clothing confuses national identity. While clothing may have confirmed national origin...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 January 2004
... of identity, gender, and geography for examination, the categories begin to conflate and the boundaries that sep- arate them begin to recede. Identity, individual or national, will intimately connect with gender (as Orton, Ruggles, Halsall, and Bossler point out); geography may be constructed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 427–431.
Published: 01 September 2002
...—such as silk, satin, and velvet—become the means by which, Roze Hentschell shows, the English articulated a sense of national identity over and against European continental types. A variety of writers, invoking the famous emblem of the Englishman who goes naked rather than wear any- thing he hasn’t...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 617–643.
Published: 01 September 2014
... extensively on the universal chronicle of Orosius, Seven Books of History against the Pagans; they both highlight the role of Tro- jan lineage in the construction of French national identity; they both con- ceive a special role for Flanders in the unfolding of imperial power; and they share an interest...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 59–84.
Published: 01 January 2002
... as capable of assimilation.5 Especially in the early modern period, English culture assimilated Gog and Magog; although originally threatening and hostile, these fluid signifiers ultimately fused to become a symbol both of national identity and of an increasingly powerful bourgeoisie. Biblical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 197–228.
Published: 01 May 2008
... available images of the East were in the later medieval period, especially of the biblical and the crusaders’ East, and how easily such images could be put to local uses, particularly concerning the touchy matter of origins and (ethnic or national) self-identity. My concern, in other words...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 447–451.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., national identities, the introspective subject, and historical consciousness itself.2 Yet, as de Grazia argues, the “modern divide” paradoxically misrepresents the his- torical consciousness of the very “early modern” period that is drafted to inaugurate it, a period that characterized itself...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 493–510.
Published: 01 September 2007
... struggles to achieve centralization and create a national identity over the course of the sixteenth century are, one might argue, part of a much longer process of consolidation and the establishment of sovereignty. With Columbus’s arrival in the New World, the chronologi- cal cut maps spatially...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (3): 511–544.
Published: 01 September 2009
... their national identity by wearing clothing derived from every region they know. Bronwen Wilson points out, in an important study of costume books as a spur to the evolution of a sense of identity in sixteenth-century Venice, that the format of the costume book — images arranged according to par- ticular...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (3): 459–481.
Published: 01 September 2009
... and customers. Women in the textile market played a much more significant role than previously understood. European economies fueled by cloth production like those of Ven- ice, Bruges, Florence, and London were attentive to how fabrics created national identities so that social status did...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 347–371.
Published: 01 May 2010
... by continuity and inclusiveness; it resists reduction or separation into units of time, nation, language, or even artistic medium. Identity for the laureate is thus not defined exclusively in terms of a status gained as a reward for past literary work. Rather, poetic iden- tity is also contingent upon...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 41–58.
Published: 01 January 2002
... identity, especially within Mannyng’s representation of imperialism. This slipperiness between the meanings of Englishness results in a text that supports one English identity in the domestic sphere and another in the national sphere.9 The first lines of the Chronicle show that Mannyng defined Eng...