1-20 of 99 Search Results for

narrative of decline

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 603–628.
Published: 01 September 2016
... Unintended Reformation historiography of modernity narrative of decline historical inevitability • • “Botched Execution” or Historical Inevitability: Conceptual...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 January 2009
... new game at cards, call’d Play by the booke (1645) is a barely comprehensible allegory based on words attached to a pack of cards in descending order of value. It claims literary affinity, once again, with Ben Jonson and starts with anti-Puritan satire but declines to a glossary of general...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 457–467.
Published: 01 September 2014
... culture of the sacred object. Critical approaches to the status of religious objects across the period have often reflected this narrative of rupture: before the Reformations, belief that the divine inhered in the material world, and after the Reformations, concern about idolatry; before the Reformations...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 555–582.
Published: 01 September 2016
... offers the outlines of a more substantial and sophisticated narrative of the birth of modernity from the anvils of Reformation doctrinal wrangling. Instead of focusing solely on sola scriptura , the essay considers other interpretive supplements: (1) the Conciliarist vs. Curialist conflict and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 559–592.
Published: 01 September 2010
... terms of the questions they provoked about the meaning of life and the nature of death, and about the divine economy of rewards and punishments. This essay places mortalist thinking in relation to competing historiographical narratives of Reformation and secularization in early modern England, paying...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2018) 48 (2): 261–300.
Published: 01 May 2018
... help parse the nuances of the distinctive narratives on which Juana rested her authority. In turn, contemporary terminology can aid in identifying certain subcategories within the celestial gender performances in Juana’s visions, such that analysis of trans, bigender, or genderqueer representations of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 531–548.
Published: 01 September 2014
... executions of four priests: Edmund Campion and Alexander Brian in 1581, Edmund Geninges in 1591, and Robert Southwell in 1595. In the narratives of these deaths, we can see how English Reformations not only occasioned new relic-making by English Catholics, but also, paradoxically, resulted in relic cults...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 305–330.
Published: 01 May 2009
... couldn't reform their spiritual lives, and suggests a new view of why changing minds wasn't as easy as the reformers had hoped, and why stripping the churches of their rood screens, burning or hiding statues of saints, overpainting narrative wall murals, and replacing stained glass with plain windows...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 487–513.
Published: 01 September 2011
... different tone than the one found in contemporary narratives of Franciscan martyrdom in Morocco or in the language of the crusading movement. Diplomacy, however, did not so much represent an alternative to expressions of religious violence, as a complement to the overall goals and aspirations of the Roman...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 161–181.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Brian C. Lockey Aphra Behns' The Rover harks back to an earlier period of intense Anglo-Spanish rivalry in which the iconography surrounding Queen Elizabeth played a central role. But the play also moves past nostalgia for late-sixteenth-century narratives of English national identity to a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 13–65.
Published: 01 January 2011
...Shankar Raman Examining a variety of moments drawn from early volumes in the India Occidentalis and India Orientalis series published by Theodor De Bry and his family, this essay studies the relationship of selected De Bry engravings to the travel narratives they purport to illustrate. It explores...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 241–280.
Published: 01 May 2014
... — contemporaries saw their own time as one involving the rediscovery of an idealized classical Greek and Roman past and disparaged the intervening centuries as a period of darkness, ignorance, and intellectual and cultural backwardness.2 This notion of a return ad fontes coalesced with a narrative about...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... challenge to the fundamental frame- work of Christian belief. In this essay, I will argue that the leper, the female, and the Jew were connected in the medieval imaginary through problem- atic relationships of contaminated blood. Further, the narratives joining these groups were constructed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 119–141.
Published: 01 January 2009
... negra of the Spaniard’s affect-form, built in large measure correlatively with the historical expansion and decline of Spain’s empire in Europe and the New World.14 Two centuries after the ghost of Kyd’s Don Andrea speaks its lines, the mysterious narrator of Charlotte Smith’s “Beachy Head...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 463–495.
Published: 01 September 2010
... critiques of the dangers inherent in the rule of one, and attached to an account of the rise of episcopacy seen as the triumph of corruption and tyranny over the liberties of the church, a process of decline which could be mapped onto, indeed was pictured as being coterminous with, the rise to power...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 369–391.
Published: 01 May 2013
... of Shadows  375 As Francesco describes it, the problem here has everything to do with the hidden nature of both credit and credit-­worthiness. The narrative itself reen- acts this obscurity by introducing the merchant as a “rich” man, only later to describe his wealth as illusory. As for...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
... in the centuries preceding its decline as an episte- mologically and spiritually significant practice. I begin with a summary of European oneirics (excluding Scandinavia) through the seventeenth century, in which my chief actors lived, dreamed, and recorded dreams. Then I intro- duce two French...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 461–486.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Sarah Hogan Edmund Spenser’s A View of the Present State of Ireland is one of the most notorious works in the imperial archive, yet its fantasy of annihilating reform, or what might now be called “creative destruction,” schemes a highly specific kind of colonial project driven by novel kinds of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... that are not selves. By catching the escaped souls and plunging them into oblivion — by moving them out of space — the pigs unburden the narrative from considering who the subject is that encounters Jesus in relation to his divide between soul and self, or the fact that there is cleavage at all...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 279–308.
Published: 01 May 2004
... to Tunis in 1390, he went on the king’s business to Rhodes later in 1390, and he died while sojourning outside Constantinople in 1391. Therefore, Clanvowe would have known this narrative not as part of the Canterbury Tales but only as the substantial Ricardian poem of the 1380s when he was a...