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names and eponyms

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Jonathan Sawday This article explores the relationship between anatomy and geography by examining the creation of “toponymical eponyms” to name both geographical and anatomical features in the period ca. 1500 – ca. 1700. The manufacture of an eponymic system to classify and catalogue features...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 233–262.
Published: 01 May 2016
... sense he himself is the forest. Both the eponymous king Perceforest and his great-nephew and heir Gallafur experience dream visions in which their subjectivities appear in vegetal form: Perceforest's depressive mental state manifests itself as an overgrown forest landscape, while Gallafur sees his body...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 119–147.
Published: 01 January 2010
... Shakespearean play, beginning with the eponymous reference to the Sermon on the Mount, and continuing with numerous ref- erences that link the interpretation of events in Vienna firmly to the inter- pretation of scripture. What does it mean that what is arguably Shakespeare’s most medi- eval play...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 469–491.
Published: 01 September 2007
... is not alone: he feels a living body in the bed beside him, which turns out, on closer investigation, to be that of a beautiful and noble young woman. The knight is Partonopeu, scion of the royal family of Franks, the eponymous hero of one of the most popular European knightly romances...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 59–84.
Published: 01 January 2002
... biblical tradition, the two were sometimes a sin- gle being (Gogmagog), sometimes separate (Gog and Magog), sometimes ethnic groups (the races of Gog and Magog), and sometimes lands. Amor- phous terms, the names were at one time or another attached to the Scythi- ans, Goths, Saracens, Jews...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 173–196.
Published: 01 January 2004
... imposed upon the subject by Lacan’s Name-of-the-Father. Later on, the relationship of our hero to the daughter of King Arcestrates of Cyrene offers the winning combination of sex, literacy, and rhetoric as the means by which the path of desire is set right. Elizabeth Archibald stresses the ways...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 313–334.
Published: 01 May 2022
... that the Gnat's song might humorously harmonize with epic. The speaker then states that whatever critic wishes to blame his playful Muse will be held lighter in name and weight than even the eponymous insect. The parallels with Vegio's situation are clear. In his epigram, he repeats the admission of trifling...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 595–613.
Published: 01 September 2015
...: A Romance (1881), describes the eponymous hero’s visit to “a solitary, wooded place,” away from the worlds of court strife, where he finds Nicholas Ferrar reflecting on “the great peace and satisfaction which he had found since he had left the world and betaken himself to that retired and religious...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 89–115.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of punitive, pseudojuridical, and medicalized discourses comes in the quar- rel of the Belle Dame sans Mercy, a series of nearly two dozen responses, continuations, and reactions to Alain Chartier’s eponymous poetic dialogue (1424) between a hapless suitor and the levelheaded lady who rejects him...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 479–504.
Published: 01 September 2000
... newly conquered subjects, and so on. However, it is still necessary in the case of Castile and León to specify explicitly the conditions in which stereo- typical discourse operated, namely, the existence of myths of vertical histor- ical origination that legitimize...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 71–98.
Published: 01 January 2013
... that could be used to perform discoveries, from which the “discovery space” derives its name. As Andrew Gurr and Mariko Ichikawa note, The central opening [of the stage’s frons] was concealed behind a hanging or elaborate cloth woven in panels with pictures of scenes from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 343–374.
Published: 01 May 2002
... is reconstructed, lamented, hoped for again.4 It is a pastoral and literary version of what the Marxist geographer David Harvey has called a “space of hope.”5 There are certain associations between writers and such regions that have become almost antonomastic—that is, the name of a region suggests...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2009
..., and [at that time] there was an open battle with Gerion king of Spain. . . . Hercules overcame him and placed Hispan on the throne from whom the name of Spain comes. And this was a very long time ago since from the foundation of Rome until the com- ing of our Savior seven hundred...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 221–253.
Published: 01 May 2017
... Mischief and his fellows New-­ Guise, Nowadays, and Nought. Nought’s name, it is worth noting, may be meant to signify not only naughtiness but also, and more ominously, nothing good.37 Such a connotation had been possible ever since Augustine, in a far more serious move than the punning of De...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 397–429.
Published: 01 September 2021
..., a city torn for more than a decade by civil strife as well as France's war with England that was nearing its eponymous hundred years. The city was under Anglo-Burgundian control but, aside from a formal entrance in 1423, both the English regent and the Duke of Burgundy remained absent. Paris enjoyed...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 433–468.
Published: 01 September 2002
... New Haven, Connecticut Staging the disappearance of the book In Prospero’s Books the writer/director Peter Greenaway presents a cornu- copia of texts, magical and humanist, scientific and fantastic, to represent the eponymous volumes of his film. In Greenaway’s vision, Prospero’s books include...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (1): 105–139.
Published: 01 January 2021
... orders, for whom pilgrimage was either considered undesirable or outright forbidden.4 But scholars have also pointed to evidence of virtual, imagined, or spiritual pilgrimage as viable alternatives to physical Jerusalem pilgrimage for many laypeople.5 We do not know the name, social status, or religious...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 515–544.
Published: 01 September 2011
... freely with the women of his house- hold. Given Tafur’s treatment of Christian conversion to Islam elsewhere in the Andanças, it is surprising that the potentially unpalatable fact that the Interpreter’s wives are Christians is here blunted by an ethnographic expla- nation, namely, that Egyptian...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (1): 87–116.
Published: 01 January 2023
.... 23, 1644, 551; see the same session in CUL MS Dd.xiv.22, 175–76. See also Machielsen, “What's in a Name?.” 59 Jerusalem Talmud Megillah 3:1 73d; Maimonides, Mishneh Torah , Tefilah and Birkat Kohanim, 8:5, 11:1. MPWA , vol. 2, session 162, Feb. 23, 1644, 551–52; see the same session in CUL...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 233–268.
Published: 01 May 2020
... on an English origin, and it is thought that the writer was possibly a Yeager / Medieval Pilgrimage as Heterotopia 237 cleric or a merchant. The Saewulf described by William of Malmesbury in his Gesta Pontificum Anglorum is often linked to the eponymous pilgrim because of compatible dates and an identical name...