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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Jonathan Sawday This article explores the relationship between anatomy and geography by examining the creation of “toponymical eponyms” to name both geographical and anatomical features in the period ca. 1500 – ca. 1700. The manufacture of an eponymic system to classify and catalogue features in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 603–628.
Published: 01 September 2016
... and histories—roads not taken— The Unintended Reformation evinces a conceptual tension underlying its overall narrative agenda, namely, that between a discretionary model of historical development and a fatalistic model of historical inevitability. © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016 The...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 201–221.
Published: 01 January 2009
... publishers. Other European titles are included whenever received. Books are classified under variable topical headings and listed alphabetically by author's name. Entries include complete bibliographical data and annotations. With few exceptions, books appearing here have been published within the previous...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 617–638.
Published: 01 September 2017
... in the eighteenth century by a group of young scholars at Peterhouse and Trinity College, who carved their names into the gold-leaf decorations. © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 • • Gold Leaf and Graffiti in a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 611–632.
Published: 01 September 2008
... publishers. Other European titles are included whenever received. Books are classified under variable topical headings and listed alphabetically by author's name. Entries include complete bibliographical data and annotations. With few exceptions, books appearing here have been published within the previous...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 273–297.
Published: 01 May 2010
... sequence and the community of sacramental practice that emerges later. Learning to distinguish among the renderings of forgiveness, from advocating it to seeking it to embodying it, is central to the process of this experiential poem, because it demands the recognition and naming of the debilitating...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 373–400.
Published: 01 May 2010
...David Schalkwyk Posing the unusual question of what Shakespeare's speech might be in relation to the texts that go under the name “William Shakespeare,” this essay puts to the question a number of assumptions in literary theory about character, subjectivity, genre, the place of the author in a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 393–417.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Brett F. Parker In 1604, the Elizabethan Society of Antiquaries examined three components of King James’s proposed Anglo-Scottish union: the unity of name, law, and Parliament. As members of the Society reconstructed English history in their papers, a variety of historical and constitutional...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 503–529.
Published: 01 September 2014
...Gail McMurray Gibson Collectors of medieval religious drama manuscripts routinely bequeathed their names to the play texts they preserved; the titles of the Towneley cycle, the Digby plays, and the Macro plays attest to the importance of prominent bookish intermediaries in saving medieval drama...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2018) 48 (2): 201–226.
Published: 01 May 2018
... necessary. Both the Western and the Eastern churches were major forces of attraction. The voivodes could prove the genuineness of a new faith by being (re-)baptized or taking monastic vows, receiving a new name, and by trans- forming architectural and artistic spaces corresponding to the new or to the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2006) 36 (1): 3–34.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., of policing, the boundaries that separate the name of one entity from the name of another; tropes are not just travelers, they tend to be smugglers and probably smug- glers of stolen goods at that.”2 The heresiologists tried to police the bound- aries so as to identify and interdict those who...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2017
... Cromwell are deeply enmeshed in the often invisible, but powerful, webs of such “occult” stories, which cannot easily be pushed aside, and whose claims are not easily resisted. The story of Albina and her sisters emerged in the fourteenth cen- tury and explained the derivation of the name of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 109–144.
Published: 01 January 2002
... list a family name.15 Since prostitutes did not generally carry a family name, can we draw the conclusion that all women who did not carry a family name were prostitutes? This supposition seems too far-fetched.16 Regardless of whether women were either forced into or willingly enlisted in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 599–607.
Published: 01 September 2017
... signs of ownership are less legible: a “Richard” whose last name has been trimmed off the page, an “Abram” whose last name has faded beyond legibility, and the name “John” alone (possibly John Moreton) all 600  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 47.3 / 2017 appear on different pages...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 467–488.
Published: 01 September 2005
... is authorized as epic poet by the auctores whom he is presented as continuing, and—in terms of his Christian poetics—surpassing. The translatio studii topos is powerfully combined with name-specifi c literary genealogies. And in this context Dante stands as the only vernacular epic poet: the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 287–321.
Published: 01 May 2015
... remember, riddles based either on the sounds of words, or on their meanings.7 Names can be broken down into their con- stituent syllables (gold [chrysos] and horse [hippos] for Chrys-ippus­ ), and con- cepts such as vice or virtue can be associated with emblematic figures (Mars or Achilles for...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 141–161.
Published: 01 January 2007
... prospers in the places he has invented, but it founders as we arrive at the real islands of Japan, Marco Polo’s fabulous Cipango. Utopian islands are all true to their name in Latin (insulae): they are isolated and, once invented, they are insulated from mariners reaching them from “across...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 417–434.
Published: 01 May 2011
... gentleman in sixteenth-­century France. For my part, I wish to consider the material book of the Essais, its shape and appearance, particularly whether the inscription of the author’s name on the title page could be considered as relevant and meaningful personal data. The very form of Montaigne’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 59–84.
Published: 01 January 2002
... biblical tradition, the two were sometimes a sin- gle being (Gogmagog), sometimes separate (Gog and Magog), sometimes ethnic groups (the races of Gog and Magog), and sometimes lands. Amor- phous terms, the names were at one time or another attached to the Scythi- ans, Goths, Saracens, Jews, and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 167–192.
Published: 01 January 2017
... Notaries usually indicated how each witness identified himself or herself (name, age, place of residence) as well as whether he or she could speak Spanish or required an interpreter, before recording what he or she had to say (i.e., how he responded to par- ticular questions). It is in these records...