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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 545–576.
Published: 01 September 2011
... this trend by presenting her as the patron saint of those New Christians who were proud of their Muslim ancestry. These Moriscos fashioned their category-defying Virgin in documents still famed as the most audacious, ingenious, and scandalous of all the myriad forgeries produced by history-mad...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 463–485.
Published: 01 September 2011
...Joshua C. Birk This essay provides an account of the uncomfortable discrepancies in the way Muslim conversion is depicted among the early Latin histories of the First Crusade. Local contexts within western Europe shaped fundamentally different views of the Crusades. An author writing from within...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 487–513.
Published: 01 September 2011
... Church supported missionary efforts to convert Muslims, but demonstrated an even greater concern with maintaining a “pastoral mission” among Christians living under Almohad authority in Morocco. Such diplomatic outreach, characterized by the papal recognition of legitimate Islamic sovereignty, struck...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 515–544.
Published: 01 September 2011
... to the courts of Muslim and Greek Orthodox rulers. The cosmopolitan potential of chivalry finds its limit in Tafur’s writing about Constantinople. Marked by circumspection about the kinds of cross-cultural and interfaith exchanges that characterized Mediterranean courts, the Andanças ’ treatment of Greek...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 459–462.
Published: 01 September 2011
... and the Mediterranean World. In numerous splendid passages, perhaps most notably in his romanticized but suggestive description of the folklore and religious beliefs of highlanders in the open- ing pages of his study, Braudel cautioned against thinking of their worlds in purely Christian or purely Muslim terms.1...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2004
... populations of Christians descended from Hispano- Romans and Visigoths lived alongside Muslim Arabs, Muslim Berbers, and Jews from 711–1492 and after. At the extremes of the political and intellec- tual camps, Iberian culture has been characterized as either the product of a dark-skinned, Muslim, North...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 57–74.
Published: 01 January 2007
... underscored through treating slaves of the faith as basically less than human.2 Not without reason were such chattel routinely called “degenerate dogs” or “dogs without religion” by both Christians and Muslims.3 The comparative decline in slave-taking following the Crusades may well have...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 9–55.
Published: 01 January 2007
..., and returning “west,” if they can). It is the realm of West- ern antiquity, a Roman, Venetian, “Muslim,” Spanish, French, or English lake, bearing goods to and for a space sooner or later called “Europe,” until the “Age of Discovery” — when interest, ambition, and slavery miraculously “shift...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 595–620.
Published: 01 September 2007
... with histories of slavery, in other words the history of race, that connects the medieval cross-cultural romance with early modern “Eastern” plays. These plays revisit earlier representations of the Muslim-Christian encounter, either explicitly, or through character types, vocabularies of dif...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 479–504.
Published: 01 September 2000
... David Hanlon Birkbeck College, University of London London, England Hispanomedievalism has always struggled to establish stable points of iden- tity for representations of the Muslim...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 January 2007
..., and even the Provençal coast, the Turks were closer to home than the Arab Muslims or “Saracens” who were associated with the medieval crusades. According to one English author, writing in 1575, the Turks “were indeede at the first very far from our Clyme & Region, and therefore the lesse...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 165–174.
Published: 01 January 2001
... politically disadvan- taged gentes, like those of the French toward Bretons in Paris, of English toward Flemings in London, of Muslims toward Copts in Cairo, or of Flemings toward Italians in Bruges. Of course, the Jews could accept baptism. Did they remain essen...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
..., especially in Christian representation of the Jews who lived in their midst (gens Judaica) and of Iberian and eastern Muslims (Saraceni ).18 Geraldine Heng has argued that a multifarious, rec- 116 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 31.1 / 2001 JMEMS31.1-05 Cohen 2...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 601–633.
Published: 01 September 2011
... into the Casa delle Zitelle in the spring of 1622.8 What might have prompted a girl from a prominent and affluent Ottoman Muslim family to leave her home and reach Venetian territory, undergo baptism, and then refuse to go back to her kin despite their plead- 602  Journal of Medieval and Early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 493–510.
Published: 01 September 2007
... and possibilities that lie ahead.11 It is unduly prolep- tic even to read in Nebrija a reference to the Muslim population of Granada or Valencia, who in 1492 spoke Arabic, for in the late fifteenth century it was still widely accepted that Muslims conquered by Christians would retain their language. While...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 79–112.
Published: 01 January 2001
... speech, the Chanson de Roland had been institutionalized as France’s national epic, incorporated into the agréga- tion in 1877 and the standard secondary school curriculum in 1880.9 As the French found compensation for their loss of Alsace-Lorraine in Muslim...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 163–195.
Published: 01 January 2007
... of the sultan of Babylon (Cairo). Dispatched from Alex- andria to be wed to the Muslim king of Algarve (southern part of current-day Portugal), she is shipwrecked on the island of Majorca. There she is rescued by a nobleman, Pericone of Visalgo, who, taken with her beauty, quickly seduces her. Pericone...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 39–56.
Published: 01 January 2001
.... Indeed, in Bosnia, the tendency has been to see a three- cornered fight between Croats, Serbs, and Muslims—two ethnic categories and one religious category. Noel Malcolm’s superb Bosnia: A Short History refuses to be drawn by the idea that these ethnicities are primordial...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 505–518.
Published: 01 September 2000
... common is the Muslim leitmotiv of this pen of destiny that I have documented it on more than one occasion in the clandestinely written and preserved codices of the Aljamiado Moriscos.9 Cervantes knew the Moriscos at first hand, for he portrays one of them frequenting...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 125–156.
Published: 01 January 2000
... the scramble for Eastern riches required that England be more flexible than rival powers. England’s willingness to do so, combined with an auspicious com- pound of religious, economic, and political conditions, yielded a relationship whereby Christians and Muslims could “speak...