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medieval scribes

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 285–311.
Published: 01 May 2022
...Chandler Fry While much criticism on the fourteenth‐century English scribe and politician Thomas Usk characterizes him as a self‐interested partisan whose Appeal and Testament of Love lay bare his hopes for material reward from London's rulers, this article argues that Usk's two texts offer...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 75–119.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., reminding us that microhistory is not reductive, as is sometimes claimed, but expansive, for when it works it connects its objects of inquiry to wider worlds of meaning and importance. © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 microhistory Carolingian monasticism codicology medieval scribes desert...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 185–210.
Published: 01 May 2000
... M690.52 These marks are in a medieval hand, and a medieval hand is also responsible for occasional directions and symbols at the bottom of folios intended to correct a misbinding. It seems that the scribe or a super- visor has checked the text against another copy. While the additions to Plimpton...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (2): 323–345.
Published: 01 May 2023
... text. Medieval scribes were constantly experimenting with new forms for committing ephemeral performances like music and drama to a manuscript page. Kempe's avoidance of her own identity and literacy not only is a strategy for self-preservation, but also is a move to best format and communicate...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 245–286.
Published: 01 May 2015
.... If the drawings indicate this scribe’s preferences within the collection he assembled, they 250  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 45.2 / 2015 Figure 1. The script, initials, and image of the h 1 scribe. From Codex Buranus (clm. 4660), fol. 47v. Reproduced by permission...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 5–40.
Published: 01 January 2000
... scribes in the early medieval period felt any need to press the rhetoric of shame, separation or hiddenness any further than their prefatory remarks. Moreover, in all the other gynecological texts circulating in Europe up through the eleventh cen- tury...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (2): 287–321.
Published: 01 May 2023
..., “The Production of Copies of the Canterbury Tales and the Confessio Amantis in the Early Fifteenth Century,” in Medieval Scribes, Manuscripts, and Libraries: Essays Presented to N. R. Ker , ed. V. J. Scattergood and Andrew G. Watson (London: Scolar Press, 1978), 163–210; and in Parkes, “Patterns of Scribal...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 573–596.
Published: 01 September 2023
.... 22 Scribes, editors, commentators, compilers, redactors, continuators, and others exercise authority over physical instances of a text. This is perhaps the most productive aspect of studying medieval authorship, not least because it carves out a significant role for scribes as secondary authors...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 283–303.
Published: 01 May 2009
... produced a very different picture of medieval romance than what we might see from the many changes that scribes made. The exclusion of meaning- ful adaptation was subtly but consequentially encouraged by Lachmannian stemmatics.17 As Anne Hudson notes, “The method assumes that the origi- nal...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 523–542.
Published: 01 September 2015
...” — was manifest in medieval scribes’ remarks on their handiwork in colophons, in illumina- tors’ use of interlace patterns in decorated borders and initials, or in binders’ use of textile chemises to encase manuscript volumes.27 Christine Sciacca has explored the medieval practice of sewing fabric curtains...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (2): 201–224.
Published: 01 May 2023
... assume they were in the scribe's copy text? This problem is particularly useful for the present task of describing the postimperial melancholia of Beowulf editing, because the debate has absolutely no bearing at all on the literal meaning of the “original” medieval text. The proposed emendations...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 251–291.
Published: 01 May 2011
... wylle” and “for þa saule” (see fig. 2). 256  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 41.2 / 2011 The second scribe’s emendations, particularly the addition of the phrase “butan he furþor wylle” [unless he wishes to (sing) more], subtly rethink the formation of community in a manner...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 517–543.
Published: 01 September 2017
..., had somehow more summarily indicated that the verse had been revised to accord with the Geneva, leading the scribe to assume that each of the three revisions therefore aligned with it, when in fact only two of the three did. 528  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 47.3 / 2017...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 461–486.
Published: 01 September 2017
... Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 47:3, September 2017 DOI 10.1215/10829636-4200044  © 2017 by Duke University Press Although it is relatively common knowledge that most copies of the Wycliffite Bible do not contain the comprehensive scriptures, the pre- dominant scholarly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (2): 245–269.
Published: 01 May 2024
... and Sexual Education in Late Medieval Britain (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2018), 12. 8 For Spryngolde as the second scribe, see Sue Ellen Holbrook, “Margery Kempe and Wynkyn de Worde,” in The Medieval Mystical Tradition in England: Exeter Symposium IV , ed. Marion Glasscoe (Woodbridge...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 41–62.
Published: 01 January 2000
... present-day readers about my project, whereas documents like the one edited and discussed here tend to rely on profuse description. The term is designed to resonate with medieval and Renaissance inscriptions of homoeroticism, often called sodomy from a theological...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 521–544.
Published: 01 September 2013
...., parishes, schools, and hospitals). As collectors, scribes, and authors, artisans became agents in the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 43:3, Fall 2013 DOI 10.1215/10829636-­2338590  © 2013 by Duke University Press spread of religious knowledge and eagerly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 395–420.
Published: 01 May 2012
... by the scribe are also for the preparation of plasters, and a prescription copied by another hand promises the efficacy of its cure likewise “on warantyse” n. When the Brogyntyn leech instructs his interlocutor to “go far 406 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 42.2 / 2012 down...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 213–250.
Published: 01 May 2001
... translation: in Book II, for example, Mechthild asks God to reward handsomely God’s scribes “sine schribere” (II, 26.34) who will copy the book after her. Despite anxiety about her role as its author, Mechthild 232 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 31.2 / 2001...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 511–529.
Published: 01 September 2007
... and with us as forgotten, and in this way and only in this way, remaining unforgettable.  — Giorg io A g a mben In the project of rethinking Medieval/Renaissance periodization — that slash that both separates and unites the “Middle Ages” and the “Renaissance” — we find ourselves in the terrain...