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medieval French romance

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 233–262.
Published: 01 May 2016
... himself as a “strange stranger” within the dream landscape, the king experiences his mystical body in vegetal terms. © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016 medieval French romance Perceforest ecocriticism forests kingship • The King’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2007) 37 (2): 373–391.
Published: 01 May 2007
... – 82; Simon Gaunt, Love and Death in Medieval French and Occitan Literature: Martyrs to Love (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), 191   – 203. 2 Jeffrey Jerome Cohen briefly discusses Galeholt as a giant, touching on the possible significance of this in regard to his fatal love...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 283–303.
Published: 01 May 2009
... inadvertently, reflects a disregard and even a distaste for the form of the story as it is related in Middle English. Such comments reveal how the modern reception history of medieval English romance is biased by French romance’s appeal to those literary and cultural qualities that modern readers tend...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 249–272.
Published: 01 May 2010
...-appreciated factor in the history of medieval diplomatic encounters. Examining chronicle sources and later literary renditions of the incident, retold from both French and an Anglo-Norman perspectives, the article reveals how medieval commentators made use of a rich emotional vocabulary in order either to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 539–560.
Published: 01 September 2006
... Sargent and Roland Schaer (Paris: Bibliothèque Natio- nale de France/Fayard, 2000), 28. 3 Roland Schaer, “L’utopie: l’espace, le temps, l’histoire,” in Utopie, ed. Sargent and Schaer, 16. I have translated from the French and added emphasis. 4 Geraldine Heng, The Empire of Magic: Medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 247–274.
Published: 01 May 2000
... in Five Middle English Bre- ton Lays,” in Readings in Medieval English Romance, ed. Carol M. Meale (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1994), 48 (citing Felicity Reedy, “The Uses of the Past in Sir Orfeo,” Yearbook of English Studies 6 [1976]: 15). The poem has often been read...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2009
... conducted to Mary. She prevaricated and in July the council had Samson / A Fine Romance  81 “sent Sir John Gates into Essex with troop of horse to stop the going away of the Lady Mary.”53 England was essential to counter French expansion. In Charles...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... our soldiers were terrified, and fled madly to the rear, in spite of the efforts of their riders.50 The scene is magnificently illustrated in a manuscript now at the Biblio- thèque Nationale de France (MS fr. 2813), where uncertain French knights swathed in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 59–84.
Published: 01 January 2002
... this episode by later romance writers strongly influenced the Middle Ages through texts like the French Historia de Prelis and Roman de Alexander, Higden’s Latin Polychronicon, and the English Kyng Alisaunder.11 Although in Pseudo-Callisthenes the races of Gog and Magog do not specifically...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 163–195.
Published: 01 January 2007
... portrait of Boccaccio’s world. It is this sense of impoverishment and constriction that this article seeks to reverse. Working from the conviction that the disciplinary rubrics defining our areas of specialization (“medieval French history,” “medieval Italian literature”) often conceal as...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 121–158.
Published: 01 January 2005
... consciousness of the popular masses the medieval tradition continued to survive up until this point. For example, the belief of French people that touching the king can cure skin diseases continued until Therefore, the defi nition of the Middle Ages depends upon your perspective and problematic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 459–481.
Published: 01 September 2009
...Margaret F. Rosenthal In the past two decades, the multifaceted discipline of the history of medieval and early modern dress has benefited from reconceptualizations of the long, late Middle Ages and Renaissance as having undergone a revolution of consciousness, belief, and thought with global...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... Modern Studies / 38.3 / 2008 with avarice is Gehazi, the Old Testament servant made leprous in pun- ishment for an act of greed and disobedience. In the Middle Ages, Gehazi was believed to be the progenitor of the cagots, a community of lepers in the French Pyranees.38 As Gehazi’s descendents...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 17–40.
Published: 01 January 2002
... must have been in oral circulation for at least thirty years. Fisher ascribes this situation to the fact that although everyone spoke English, official and polite writing took place in the nonna- tive prestige languages of Latin and French, offering no openings for the publication of written...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 185–210.
Published: 01 May 2000
... transmission of medieval texts and books. The eighteenth and nine- teenth centuries in Britain were crucial for these activities. A striking case in the Gower canon is that of the Trentham manuscript, now London, British Library, Additional MS 59495, which contains some of Gower’s Latin and French works...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 321–344.
Published: 01 May 2014
... also represents her as a captive of erotic desire, a slave of unruly passion, and a prisoner of the law. This multifaceted vision of royal incarceration is animated by a heterogeneous tradition of ideological writing in medieval and early modern England and Scotland. Three strands of a rich mosaic of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 515–544.
Published: 01 September 2011
... readers about remote parts of the world, but rather in the unusual perspectives he brings to neighboring climes that may already be familiar to his readers. Marshalling the rhetorical resources of chivalric romance, the Andanças presents two, often conflicting, 516  Journal of Medieval and Early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 January 2009
... 1625 through to 1700.33 And indeed siege warfare narrative is not out of place in a mock-romance: The night before (being the 30 of August) Coronell Hauteriue had attempted to lay a Damme of Rize-busshes ouer the moate of the Horne-worke, in the French Approach.: but...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 263–287.
Published: 01 May 2016
... trivial event and that women’s refusals are always open to reversal even after the fact, an element of both medieval and modern rape culture.23 Paden argues that Gravdal overstates the centrality of rape to the genre by restricting her analysis to Old French lyrics (which posit the threat...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Holly A. Crocker This article argues that Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida continues an important late medieval poetic tradition that highlights the troubling consequences of virtue’s performativity for idealized women. If Chaucer is pessimistic about the potential for Criseyde’s ethical agency...