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medical narrative

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 167–188.
Published: 01 January 2016
.... In doing so, it demonstrates that narrative form can bridge the communication gap between the suffering writer and his readers. • “O Multiplied Misery The Disordered Medical Narrative of John...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Marion Turner Medical language permeated all kinds of texts in premodern Europe, including legal, literary, devotional, political, autobiographical, and philosophical writings. The essays in this special issue are particularly interested in the functions of metaphor and of narrative. Many thinkers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 117–139.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Margaret Healy In the political turmoil of mid-seventeenth-century England, both socio-political utopias and dystopias were repeatedly imagined through corporeal images and medical metaphors and narratives. The new iatrochemistry—Paracelsian and subsequently Helmontian medicine—featured especially...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 33–59.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Clarissa Chenovick Henry of Lancaster's Livre de Seyntz Medicines is a vividly medicalized penitential narrative composed by a leading lay nobleman of fourteenth-century England. Grounded in the physiology of the medieval heart, Lancaster's understudied Livre demonstrates how medieval medical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 61–87.
Published: 01 January 2016
... and methods, but in experiential knowledge, explained to his audience through specific narratives. We can see in Henry Daniel’s Liber Uricrisiarum or the English translations of Guy de Chauliac’s extensive medical works how each “exemplifies the sort of vernacular medi- cal literature produced...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (2): 453–455.
Published: 01 May 2014
..., devotional, political, autobiographical, and philosophical writings; equally medical writings drew on a range of discursive practices, 454  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 44.2 / 2014 often employing ostentatiously literary narrative techniques. Many mod- ern thinkers, most famously...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 237–239.
Published: 01 January 2014
... production with a broader consideration of how this new material enables us to revise established narratives about the nature and uses of early modern books. Deadline for submission of manuscripts: July 1, 2014 Medical Discourse in Premodern Europe Edited by Marion Turner Volume 46 / Number...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 89–115.
Published: 01 January 2016
... physical interaction with the first-­person lover-­narrator: they punish, assault, or imprison him; they console or heal him. In the fifteenth century, such vision-­narratives tend to adopt real-­world professional dis- courses, such as legal or medical language and imagery. Allegory’s moral- izing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 247–273.
Published: 01 May 2013
... are reflected in narratives of illness in which women suffer instantly and intensely in response to rela- tional stimuli and men downplay their emotions by focusing on subsequent physiological processes. These gender norms were also substantiated by medical conceptions of the body that deemed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 667–669.
Published: 01 September 2014
... kinds of texts in premodern Europe, includ- ing legal, literary, devotional, political, autobiographical, and philosophical writings; equally medical writings drew on a range of discursive practices, often employing ostentatiously literary narrative techniques. Many mod- ern thinkers, most...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 403–412.
Published: 01 September 2008
... in nonmedical literature such as travel treatises; and concepts of disease in pan-European myth-making. The volume concludes with a description of a major archive for the study of medical history, the Duke University History of Medicine Collections. In a sense, each essay encapsulates both the promise...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 137–163.
Published: 01 January 2024
... in a narrative whose perfection depends on its simplicity, precision, and brevity.” 42 Given these criteria, the model medical reports that appear in these manuals can make for dry reading. Nevertheless, even in their relative brevity and simplicity, they record and promote a systematic investigative method...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 289–314.
Published: 01 May 2016
... for the parturient mother that remains accessible is the legend and material culture of Saint Margaret, the patron saint of childbirth. Alongside the saint’s legend, prayers, medical texts, and amulets dedicated to Saint Margaret were often used to comfort and protect the parturient woman during labor...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Susan Zimmerman The derogation of leprosy in medieval culture was disproportionate to its medical threat, presumably influenced by the spectacle of a disintegrative process akin to putrefaction. In the medieval imaginary, leprous blood was linked to menstrual blood, supposedly discharged by both...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (1): 183–200.
Published: 01 January 2009
... by thick bureaucracy, inquisitors, and confessors, such a testimony may have seemed utterly natural, indeed com- pulsory, for his New World tale resonates with contemporary confessional modes of colonial first-person narration, namely, the Spanish relación.19 The deployment of this narrative...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 669–671.
Published: 01 September 2016
... on what could be seen with the eyes through the practice of dissection. There- after the most authoritative philosophical and medical pronouncements of the day (by the Hippocratics, Galen, and Ibn Sina) were put to rest unless the eye of the inquirer could confirm them. Vesalius’s masterpiece repre...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2015
... thoroughly sealed casket one hundred thirty-­one years later. Was this new finding a prank, or was it another surprise concocted by an unnamed “pious gentleman” to reunite the poet with the ethereal and yet so present “Laura” figure of his sonnets? What these narratives illustrate, among...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 589–610.
Published: 01 September 2008
... of medical experience by separating an initial disease narrative based upon empirical observation, the observatio proper, from the learned discussion of it.25 Sixteenth-century physicians often cited Antonio Benivieni’s De abditis et non nullis ac mirandis morborum et sanationum causis (Florence, 1507...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 79–104.
Published: 01 January 2018
.... This narrative of the masculinization and medicalization of child- birth typically continues with reference to increasingly stringent licensing 96  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 48.1 / 2018 practices and the emergence of university-­based courses of instruction in obstetrics, reserved...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 121–146.
Published: 01 January 2017
... the thirteen-­year-­old pregnant girl could have possibly known about her condition, but resist pursuing them: “Such inte- rior experience, at the intersection of the material and the cultural, gener- ally eludes the historian’s grasp.”5 And here their narrative and analysis end. Enter the literary...