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madness and possession

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 53–77.
Published: 01 January 2015
... in constructing new understandings of suicide in the early modern period. © 2015 by Duke University Press 2015 early modern convents madness and possession suicide and religion a Women on the Edge: Madness...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 639–641.
Published: 01 September 2015
... of Hybrid Books: Thomas Milles between Manuscript and Print  457 – 485 Smyth, Adam Little Clippings: Cutting and Pasting Bibles in the 1630s  595 – 613 640  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 45.3 / 2015 Strocchia, Sharon T. Women on the Edge: Madness, Possession, and Suicide...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 219–243.
Published: 01 May 2015
... in treating illness, infertility, madness, possession, and so on; whereas irrational prac- tices, incoherent language, and hostile, poisonous environments are attrib- uted to non-­Christian peoples and places. Therefore, what I am proposing is a reappraisal of Anglo-­Saxon modes of perceiving...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 321–365.
Published: 01 May 2021
... was protoromantic, that is, because he produced an art in which it was possible to find expressions of a mind possessive of a wildly unique vision. 46 The notion that madness must have impressed itself on the artist's style at a given point has dictated the if/then reasoning of the efforts at chronological order...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 505–518.
Published: 01 September 2000
... the destruction of his character Don Quixote, accelerating his death in order to prevent the further misappropriation of his text, already once violated by Avellaneda.)18 These unbelievers, S≥rat al-Qalam once again emphasizes, have declared the Prophet possessed, “mad...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... these soul-­possessing humans were. They are already untranslatable, as a fundamental condition. The central question “Who is Faustus?” — or Shylock, or anyone —  can be phrased more simply by considering the prototypical scene of bestial soul migration in Christian lore, one that occurs twice...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 247–274.
Published: 01 May 2000
... for their queen’s repose, but as Penelope Doob has suggested, the diction seems to hint that the maidens are (will- fully?) negligent of Heurodis’s safety at the notoriously dangerous moment of “vndrentide” (65).12 Their negligence is more pronounced when, as she awakens to madness, they “No durst wip hir...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 269–291.
Published: 01 May 2020
... neaver biginnen. [makes men who ought to know well that they are begotten and born and brought forth through the heavenly Father to make such idols of tree or of stone or (through more madness) of gold or of silver, and to give them various names, of sun or of moon, of wind and wood and waters...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 545–576.
Published: 01 September 2011
... this trend by presenting her as the patron saint of those New Christians who were proud of their Muslim ancestry. These Moriscos fashioned their category-defying Virgin in documents still famed as the most audacious, ingenious, and scandalous of all the myriad forgeries produced by history-mad...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 185–210.
Published: 01 May 2000
... Gower’s Confes- sio Amantis in the possession of Columbia University Library and the Pier- pont Morgan Library. On one of the days I was at Columbia, a magnificent translation of Bartholomaeus Anglicus’s De proprietatibus rerum, Plimpton MS 263, was being examined at an adjacent table; the scholar...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
..., marvellous ill-favored. Gloucester: Come, cousin, canst thou quake and change thy color,   Murther thy breath in middle of a word,   And then again begin, and stop again,   As if thou wert distraught and mad with terror? Buckingham: Tut, I can counterfeit the deep...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 549–583.
Published: 01 September 2014
..., “This is the Idol they worship and adore,” and ruined the image with musket fire. “A common Fame” followed: it was rumored that by “divine Vengeance,” “one was struck blind upon the place by a Re-­bound of his Bullet” and “another dyed mad a little after.” Gunton cannot confirm the report, however; he...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 17–43.
Published: 01 January 2014
... Augustine’s use of “impudent” is important for us not because he uses it in an unusual sense, but because he so richly exemplifies its usual one and chases it so far down the trail of its conceptual implication. This sense remains a common possession of European writing for centuries...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 33–59.
Published: 01 January 2016
...- ment of a dangerous, madness-­inducing fever, “frenesie” (132 – 56), and a gangrenous disease called “hell’s fire” (161 – 70), both of which could result from lying wounded for a long time. These pretreatments are followed by the anointing of the imagined body’s wounds with the healing ointment...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 533–551.
Published: 01 September 2021
... his claim, performs something like a possession on the gentleman. 18 Before king and court, the gentleman gives a “great scritch [screech],” falls into a madness, and capers about until his head hits the ceiling, all “to the great admiration of his Maiestie and others then present.” After being...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 517–536.
Published: 01 September 2003
... for carrying off “the trophy from the enemy ( ex hoste tropaeum he shifted a snippet of Virgilian praise ( Georgics 3.32) from Octavian to the protomartyr. Similarly, Damasus’ description of a persecut- ing Roman mob as “mad dogs ( canibus rabidis )” redeployed words Virgil had used to characterize...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 567–591.
Published: 01 September 2022
... the hearers of your sermons come out like men possessed, with anger and rage on their faces. 41 Compare David Aers on the violence fueled by Calvin against the Anabaptists in the name of a literal reading of the Old Testament: “These pacifist Christians [according to Calvin] embody ‘barbarism...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 83–105.
Published: 01 January 2012
... to the common good are those moments in which avarice is exceeded by envy. Where envy moves beyond a desire to possess an object enjoyed by another to the desire to destroy the neighbor’s very capacity for enjoyment, envy reveals itself as preeminently dangerous.22 Gower’s Genius accordingly refers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 369–391.
Published: 01 May 2011
... — and it is in that experiment, more than anywhere else, that we find a bridge between the divided and possessed soul of the medieval psychomachia and some of the most deeply allegorical districts of modern literature. In Skelton’s hands the occult struc- tures of allegorical vision become the basis for a particular sort...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 573–596.
Published: 01 September 2023
... in a multitude of directions. Such texts only possess frontiers—rugged, shifting, provisional, suggestive. The formal and semantic instability of the premodern text, and the extent of what it can and what it cannot become, has confounded New Historicists to the point of doubting the existing of a knowable text...