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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 25–38.
Published: 01 January 2005
... perfunctory, and perhaps for similar reasons, in his brief com- ments on Hoccleve.  Derek Pearsall, John Lydgatee (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, quoted by Simpson, Reform and Cultural Revolution,  Pearsall, John Lydgate, quoted by Simpson, Reform and Cultural Revolution...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 285–314.
Published: 01 May 2008
...Amy Appleford © 2008 by Duke University Press 2008 a The Dance of Death in London: John Carpenter, John Lydgate, and the Daunce of Poulys Amy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
... in an unstable universe, Lydgate locates the source of women’s mutability in the cultural contingency that accompanies masculine violence, especially war. Henryson’s bracing meditation on Cresseid’s physical demise exposes the heroic exploitation of women’s virtue, but it also constructs a tangible...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 355–377.
Published: 01 May 2006
... political viability of the dual monarchy of England and France. A significant number of poetic texts survive from these Lancastrian occasions, most of them by John Lydgate. Lydgate devoted much of his long life to composing verses for the patronage of Henry V and Humphrey of Gloucester, but...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 511–517.
Published: 01 September 2012
... to His Son, which draws upon John Lydgate’s Fall of Princes. This is followed by Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes, a text that has been called Lydgate’s most political poem.1 After the Siege comes Lydgate and Benet Burgh’s Secrets of Old Philosophers, a text that purports to be a let- ter from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 111–120.
Published: 01 January 2005
... English writing vitally into the story, given that too much of it had been seen merely as a foil to set off Chaucer’s incontestable brilliance. Lydgate played a signifi cant role in that strategy. (iv) To reconceive specifi c areas of Middle English literary...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 221–253.
Published: 01 May 2017
..., verse chronicles of the kings of England by the fifteenth-­century poet John Lydgate, the history of London known as Gregory’s Chronicle — to didactic material like the Boke of Curtesy, Lydgate’s “Dietary,” a vernacular medical treatise, and directions for bloodletting.4 It also contains a few...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 447–451.
Published: 01 September 2007
...-based origins and models, to Japanese historiogra- phy; Marisa Galvez examined the editorial histories of medieval vernacular songbooks as both reflecting and defying modern paradigms of medieval- ness; Amanda Walling contrasted John Lydgate’s models of periodization in the Fall of Princes with...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 173–195.
Published: 01 January 2010
... Tale is the most famous example. For Patterson, in texts such as the Knight’s Tale, Anelida and Arcite, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes, “Thebanness” finds its expression in repeated motifs of dou- bling that in turn produce a very specific vision of the relationship between past and present: “a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 13–24.
Published: 01 January 2005
... “meters or poesie . . . translated out of French into English by Iohn Lidgate, Monke of Bury” Simpson then considers what has been lost, in every sense, by such violent erasure; he does much of this by restoring (in the fullest and most vigorous sense) Lydgate. Sarah Beckwith, in a public...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 37–63.
Published: 01 January 2010
... Lydgate’s long verse Life of Saints Edmund and Fremund may be read as an allegory for Henry himself.13 Edmund is a pious Anglo-Saxon king who refuses to defend himself or his people against the invading Danes because of his deep Christian aversion to violence. His death at their hands is thus...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 39–66.
Published: 01 January 2005
... anyone have put money on that being John Lydgate rather than Geoff rey Chaucer? It is, furthermore, unusual to begin most chapters covering these two centuries with Tudor writers or vignettes rather than with earlier Middle English texts or at least Ricardian authors. It is surprising that the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 219–245.
Published: 01 May 2013
... why religious ones had medical benefits. Lydgate’s Merita Missae describes an “encrease of vertue called vegetatyfe” among the nonmir­ aculous effects of the Mass.27 While sacraments and drugs were discrete forms of remedy, charms explicitly interwove the intentionality of language and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 269–305.
Published: 01 May 2012
... subjected to long- ago martyrdoms: the power of virgins over death itself. For example, John Lydgate’s Life of Saint Margaret of Antioch (writ- ten ca. relates how she, having accepted baptism against her father’s wishes, is seen and desired by one Olibrius, pagan prefect of the region...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 321–354.
Published: 01 May 2006
... themselves in the balls67 In the early sixteenth century, “Nullus” was the stage name adopted by a Leipzig professor in his disputation with a pseudo­ nymous “Nemo.”68 In an example more likely to have influenced Mankind, John Lydgate, Bury St. Edmunds’s most prolific literary son, employed a simi...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 197–217.
Published: 01 January 2007
... plates. $65.00. Montrose, Louis. The Subject of Elizabeth: Authority, Gender, and Represen- tation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006. xiii, 341 pp.; 51 illus. $64.00, paper $25.00. Nolan, Maura. John Lydgate and the Making of Public Culture. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, vol...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 3–12.
Published: 01 January 2005
...” coincident with the Henri- cian Reformation with a rival reading of the formal, intellectual, and ideo- logical properties of Lydgate’s work. Theatrical history is so often the poor sister of literary history; it is frequently excluded from literary histories and published rather under a sep...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 455–473.
Published: 01 May 2006
.... [Facing-page Latin texts with English translations.] Lydgate, John The Life of St. Edmund, King and Martyr: John Lydgate’s Illus- trated Verse Life Presented to Henry VI; A Facsimile [Lives of Saints Edmund and Fremund]. Edited by A. S. G. Edwards. London: British Library, 2004. 23 pp., [238...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 475–477.
Published: 01 May 2006
... with English translations.] Lydgate, John The Life of St. Edmund, King and Martyr: John Lydgate’s Illus- trated Verse Life Presented to Henry VI; A Facsimile [Lives of Saints Edmund and Fremund]. Edited by A. S. G. Edwards. London: British Library, 2004. 23 pp., [238] manuscript pp. $100.00...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 289–314.
Published: 01 May 2016
... The version in the Gilte Legend asks for the safe deliverance of the woman and child, with no mention of deformi- ties.17 Lydgate’s Lyfe of Seynt Margaret prays only for the safety of the mother, asking that the Lord be her “leche,” or physician.18 Osbern Bokenham’s legend and a couplet version...