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legal disputes

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 453–473.
Published: 01 September 2021
... and spectators to assent in specific legal claims to the land in dispute. Copyright © 2021 by Duke University Press 2021 medieval and early modern Rogation perambulation liturgical practice property law legal disputes performance theory Rogationtide perambulations took place throughout medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 493–521.
Published: 01 September 2008
... retardation, epilepsy, deformity, disputed sexuality (hermaphroditism, intersexuality, or castration), deafness, blindness, and even more fleeting circumstances such as fever, could call into question an individual's ability to perform normal legal actions or to be allowed to inherit an estate, serve...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 89–111.
Published: 01 January 2024
... but thorny case involved acts that, by their nature, were not committed in front of witnesses. For example, sexual intercourse was legally relevant whenever the validity of marriages was in dispute, such as the case in which a marriage was not consummated. This issue came up relatively frequently and could...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 147–166.
Published: 01 January 2017
...Peter Arnade; Elizabeth Colwill Late medieval and early modern pardon letters are among the best sources of ordinary people's voices in the premodern period. The stuff of social history, these legal documents allow us access to nonelite social actors and masculine spaces of sociability. Yet...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 299–323.
Published: 01 May 2010
... knowledge, or even as an important impetus for further scientific development, my argument is that this scientific state of affairs made possible a new form of political historiography. Investigating this disputed cartography — one which was negoti- ated in narrative and whose stakes were...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 545–571.
Published: 01 September 2023
... the purposes of kings and their counselors. This essay traces commentators’ reticence about acknowledging the legislative purposes behind early English legislation to disputes over codification that agitated German-speaking parts of Europe in the early nineteenth century. Yet the earliest editors...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 471–492.
Published: 01 September 2003
... that the genre was somehow becoming less necessary equally fails to take into account the many complex issues surrounding the legal and conciliar processes against heresy, which became so prominent a feature from late antiquity onwards, and which indicate a lively interest in the matter. 50...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 431–451.
Published: 01 September 2021
... dialogue form print and performativity audience reception In the early 1530s, two of the foremost legal minds of sixteenth-century England engaged in a bitter print controversy over the subject of reform. Christopher St. German, one of the first vernacular expositors of English law, sparred...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 545–571.
Published: 01 September 2013
... had long rankled civic governors and guilds, sparking a series of legal and political skirmishes between the City and St. Martin’s in the 1520s and 1530s. This article examines St. Martin’s community of Dutch and French immigrants, who constituted the densest concentration of aliens...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 285–314.
Published: 01 May 2008
... appearances in the city court records, seems to have been a popular choice for feoffee or trustee, executor, and mediator in legal disputes. He was involved in the bequests of several wealthy Londoners and was a powerful promoter of the interests of the city’s elite, living and dead, as he...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 241–262.
Published: 01 May 2021
...—of the veil? Note that Psellos scripted his report at the order of Emperor Michael VII Doukas, not as a generic account of the miracle that occurred every Friday, but as a response to a specific legal case sorting out the ownership of a watermill over which the Blachernae icon and its miracle presided...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (2): 251–278.
Published: 01 May 2004
... it. The effect can be detected in the way that normally subtle readers choose to oppose the poem as if they were one of the disputants within it, greeting all the complexity of its state- ments with the blunt declaration that it “has no message.”1 The effect is evident as well in the way even...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 467–492.
Published: 01 September 2023
... that an auctoritas has a waxen nose, “which means that it can be bent into taking on different meanings.” 49 Jean de Montreuil, royal secretary and provost of Lisle (d. 1418), once spoke in a rather resigned manner of “the license of disputation” [disputandi licentia] which involves “the early morning...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 119–147.
Published: 01 January 2010
... in a sermon before the queen, “It is now disputed at every table, whether the magistrate be of necessity bound to the judicials of Moses.”7 Whitgift’s complaint reveals the resistance in some quarters to this form of Protestant hermeneutics, but also underscores the degree to which biblical legalism...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 89–115.
Published: 01 January 2016
... physical interaction with the first-­person lover-­narrator: they punish, assault, or imprison him; they console or heal him. In the fifteenth century, such vision-­narratives tend to adopt real-­world professional dis- courses, such as legal or medical language and imagery. Allegory’s moral- izing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 583–602.
Published: 01 September 2016
... truth claims. As Gregory is fond of pointing out in his discussion of doctri- nal disputes within Christianity, given the principle of noncontradiction, conflicting truth claims are irreconcilable (110). Disagreement is real; every- one cannot be right. It is not, though, in Gregory’s interest...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 379–408.
Published: 01 May 2001
...- tainly stand as “the real,” since no one disputed that something happened. Considerable ink was spilled, however, about why and how the fire started. Our mediated access to that real event is not a consequence only of the passage of time. Even then, no one was sure...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 249–268.
Published: 01 May 2012
... of Protestant soteriology, and makes comparison with contemporary legal practice. In my view, Shuger does the following in her essay: she mischarac- terizes pre-­Reformation theology of penance; and she deeply underestimates the seriousness with which Reformation soteriological theology undoes its...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 311–334.
Published: 01 May 2003
... is appropriate for anyone who pub- lishes an “indiscreet indulgence” to that effect.2 Indulgentias indiscretas have no papal privilege or any other legal justification to support them; anyone who publicizes them is foolhardy and presumptuous, and sins gravely and mortally: indeed, they are speaking against...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 January 2015
... assent to such punishments and eventually accept burning as a legal form of punishment. Rejecting a purely theological or symbolic view of the dead consigned to the flames as representing the punishments of hell, this article stresses the parallel between the saints and the cursed. If from a medieval...