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language of suffering

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2019) 49 (1): 57–84.
Published: 01 January 2019
... © 2019 by Duke University Press 2019 King Lear tragedy language of suffering Incarnation of Christ Assumption of Mary ...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 289–314.
Published: 01 May 2016
... her that pain is not shameful, but rather a testament of faith and security. Margaret’s testimony to the ennobling effect of pain is evident in the way she shifts the language of bodily rupture and integrity used by those around her to describe her suffering. The saint’s redefinition of the torn...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2019) 49 (2): 265–294.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Jessica Hines Building on recent critical conversations in the history of the emotions, this article examines how the language of compassion came into English culture and how it was deployed for theological and political purposes. It traces the growth of compassion in England in the early fifteenth...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 213–231.
Published: 01 May 2016
...John Leeds Recent scholarship has asserted that Renaissance humanists adopted an effectively poststructuralist view of language as a sign system independent of extramental reality. But language involves more than signs, and this scholarly position squares poorly with the theory of verbal mood...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2016
...—most famously Susan Sontag—have commented on the problems inherent in trying to write about suffering and on the limitations of metaphorical language. At the same time, many writers (both premodern and modern) have seen opportunities in the richness, polysemy, and (sometimes) novelty of medical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 321–344.
Published: 01 May 2014
... political philosophy of John Fortescue and George Buchanan. Much more than a broadly gendered metaphor for queenly submission, this language of royal imprisonment derives its legitimacy from discourses that touch upon the very ideological foundations of English and Scottish monarchy. © 2014 by Duke...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 89–115.
Published: 01 January 2016
... late medieval sufferer: thanks to the diverse metaphorical valences of illness and therapy current in the fifteenth-century West, medicalization offers an alternate and potentially nonmoralistic or plurimoralistic mode of continuation. The late medieval debate over the Belle Dame thus affords...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 629–651.
Published: 01 September 2016
... “fair purse” passage, it argues that interpretation of the image of the purse has suffered at the expense of current preoccupation with the material and allegedly digressive body. The essay uses lexical evidence to demonstrate the significance of ingestion as much as digestion to Julian's image, and to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 323–342.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., which held that all animal and plant life will perish after the Last Judgment and not be part of the promised “new heaven and new earth,” Bradford argues that creation in its entirety—not just humanity—will joyously be freed from the suffering it has endured since the Fall. © 2015 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 219–245.
Published: 01 May 2013
... England. Though hidden and obscure to most modern scholars, how qualities operated in contemporary remedies, such as those for horses suffering from founder, raises questions about the nature of vernacular knowledge of philosophical and theological concepts and their relation to lived everyday life. We...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 413–442.
Published: 01 September 2008
... thousand years ago, might solve their suffering here and now. Yet they wouldn't dream of seeking succor in the works of Galen. Why? How have the beliefs and practices that guided Western medicine up through the eighteenth century come to seem, paradoxically, more alien and distant than ancient Chinese...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 167–188.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 46:1, January 2016 DOI 10.1215/10829636-3343159  © 2016 by Duke University Press never felt” by “hint[ing] at a specific and authentic experience of physical suffering.”5 Indeed, Donne himself conveys in the book’s final devotion that bodily...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 395–420.
Published: 01 May 2012
... fifteenth centuries had the effect of yoking together in the minds of British readers the materiality of medical language and the materiality of the body. I examine how the literate creativity of practical medical writing addressed the problem of jargon as well as how satires of medical expertise...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 43–64.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Roland Greene This essay analyzes the figures of language and of landscape that allow Edmund Spenser to consider in an international context the virtue at the center of Book V of The Faerie Queene , justice. How, he asks, is justice projected from one society into another in an act of empire...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 365–394.
Published: 01 May 2012
..., and a number of others are cited as examples of people who gained great esteem in Rome, though they were not born there.17 The empire, as it grew, was united by power and language, hand in hand. But after its fall, the many disciplines that relied on Latin suffered too. It was only the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 327–358.
Published: 01 May 2017
... Richard Plantagenet's extraction from sanctuary at Westminster in The History of Richard III (1557). Moreover, Ford redirects the language of contemporary chroniclers Francis Bacon and Thomas Gainsford in order to emphasize the link between sanctuary and practices of royal pity in the play. By positioning...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 263–287.
Published: 01 May 2016
... bemoaning the suffering of lovesickness, separation, and rejection comprise the bulk of the miscellany’s contents. Yet only pages later, the language of polite supplica- tion and courteous flattery reappears verbatim in the mouths of rapists in the pastourelles. This stark juxtaposition serves as...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 487–513.
Published: 01 September 2011
... different tone than the one found in contemporary narratives of Franciscan martyrdom in Morocco or in the language of the crusading movement. Diplomacy, however, did not so much represent an alternative to expressions of religious violence, as a complement to the overall goals and aspirations of the Roman...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 61–87.
Published: 01 January 2016
... holes in their narratives. All focus on the limits of narrative and narrator alike, modeling the inability of narrative to make sense of pain. © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016 medieval medical language illness narratives Geoffrey Chaucer John Arderne Thomas Hoccleve...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 89–117.
Published: 01 January 2010
... penance, full of the language of shrift and suffering. “Let me choose,” Bassanio tells Portia, who herself has admitted to being about to “wish a sin,” “For as I am, I live upon the rack.” Portia: Upon the rack, Bassanio? Then confess   What treason there is mingled with your love...