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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 279–304.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Helen Cushman The representations of the midwife Salome and the Apostle Thomas in the N-Town and Chester plays complicate the relationship between two modes of knowledge: “clergie” or male clerical learning, on the one hand, and knowledge derived from sensory experience on the other. The plays...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
... and chief allegorist of the sixteenth century are scarce. Through an examination of these texts, this article argues that both works share an identifiable bodily epistemology that positions knowledge production in the bodies of all, including women and lower-status men. Even as this bodily...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 219–245.
Published: 01 May 2013
... England. Though hidden and obscure to most modern scholars, how qualities operated in contemporary remedies, such as those for horses suffering from founder, raises questions about the nature of vernacular knowledge of philosophical and theological concepts and their relation to lived everyday life. We...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 367–393.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Jenny C. Mann This essay documents the mutual interactions of philosophy and poesis in early modern theories of knowledge. It does so by following the trajectory of the wax image, or simulacrum, from Greek philosophy to Roman rhetoric and onwards to early modern philosophy and poetry. Ovid’s fable...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2018) 48 (2): 227–260.
Published: 01 May 2018
... affective piety does not position “heart knowledge” ( sapientia ) and “head knowledge” ( scientia ) as mutually exclusive. Instead, A Christian Mannes Bileeve fuses reason (“skil”) with affect (“kyndenesse”), generating a reasonable love borne from gratitude for God that arises from knowing the Apostles...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2019) 49 (1): 169–191.
Published: 01 January 2019
... childe” strives to understand sin, guilt, and culpability within the constraints of humanity’s limited self- knowledge. Julian both works within and transcends established scriptural and penitential traditions of representing childhood, childlikeness, and the related quality of meekness, a key virtue in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2017
... knowledge. The articles that follow, by the roundtable particpants themselves, bring microhistorical methodology to the study of social and cultural history, legal history, the history of crime, gender history (making use of the often overlooked potential in literary texts), and global history. These...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 513–543.
Published: 01 September 2016
... Goodman, John Milton, John Wesley). There is evidence of a parallel development in scientific circles, as practitioners like Robert Boyle reflected on the necessary role of implicit faith in the collective production of knowledge, a project to which the ideal image of the self-determining individual...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 53–73.
Published: 01 January 2017
... article posits five further traits of microhistory: its insistence on the dense connectedness of things; its professed ignorance or very partial knowledge; its invitation to the reader to share doubt; its bridled intimacy with the elusive past; its half-baffled engagement with story as device and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2019) 49 (2): 295–317.
Published: 01 May 2019
... relevant events, or to have knowledge of reputation accorded by spatial proximity. The play shows that the legal concept of the witness promoted local rather than central authority, and the play’s own dramatic practices can be theorized through legal concepts. In addition, the play draws attention to the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 467–491.
Published: 01 September 2008
.... Analyzing a group of letters sent to the Spanish court physician Juan Muñoz y Peralta (1665–1746) by his patients, this article shows how these patients, far from being passive, were actively involved in elaborating medical knowledge and in making decisions about therapeutic strategies for their own...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 493–521.
Published: 01 September 2008
... shaped not only by “experts” (physicians, theologians, and jurists) but also by what may be called local knowledge. © 2008 by Duke University Press 2008 a The Body Debated: Bodies and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 523–557.
Published: 01 September 2008
... an erotics of knowledge. © 2008 by Duke University Press 2008 a “There’s the Rub”: Searching for Sexual Remedies in the New World Valeria Finucci...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 567–596.
Published: 01 September 2012
...Claire Taylor Jones This essay explores how the performance of the liturgy was integrated into late medieval education of nuns, for whom liturgical text conveyed both linguistic and spiritual knowledge. In southern German Observant Dominican convents, Latin language was systematically taught to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 395–420.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Julie Orlemanski When the men and women of late medieval Britain began to read and produce medical writings on a scale unprecedented in earlier centuries, they faced the problem of jargon—that is, how to negotiate the interface between knowledge and nonsense in their literate practices. The...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 473–485.
Published: 01 September 2013
... “craft,” “art,” and “knowledge,” which began to create cultural divisions between artisan and artist, artisan and scientist. The essays in this volume explore artisan culture from a variety of perspectives, analyzing the representation of premodern artisans as distinctive cultural producers and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 599–621.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Luis R. Corteguera How did artisanal methods and practices inform the new science of politics attributed to Machiavelli and elaborated by others? Historians of science have noted how artisans’ direct observation of nature and knowledge acquired from hands-on experience informed their methods of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 95–112.
Published: 01 January 2014
...Stephen Gaukroger One of most surprising aspects of the shift from scholastic natural philosophy to the new mechanist natural philosophies in the early decades of the seventeenth century is the retention of a doctrinal conception of knowledge. There was an assumption not only among scholastics, but...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2015
... of saints and the bodies of criminals, the bodies of the dying confessing on their deathbeds and the bodies of suicides choosing to be buried with their souls unprepared. A new frame of knowledge becomes possible when we familiarize ourselves with the face of death. The six essays presented in this...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 219–243.
Published: 01 May 2015
... “superstition” and thus to extend scientific knowledge into the early Middle Ages, long before the much-lauded achievements of the “Renaissance” and “Enlightenment.” From this vantage point, Anglo-Saxon ways of perceiving and knowing do not mirror or anticipate modern mental habits that split science and poetry...