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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 23–45.
Published: 01 January 2003
...Andrew S. Jacobs © by Duke University Press 2003 The Remains of the Jew: Imperial Christian Identity in the Late Ancient Holy Land Andrew S. Jacobs...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 7–30.
Published: 01 January 2009
... Spain of the converso, a hybrid who blurs the boundaries between Christian and Jew. Using recent psychoanalytic criticism of the Prioress's Tale , Chaucer's sentimentalized representation of the murdered child's mother is contrasted with the very different one in Damián de Vegas's Memoria del Santo...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 577–599.
Published: 01 September 2011
... case of the Marranos or crypto-Jews (or presumed crypto-Jews). Three major differences between these two phenomena emerge. First, Nicodemites were voluntary converts to Protestantism, while Marranos were either forced converts or the children of forced converts to Catholicism. Secondly, Protestant and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 315–337.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Christina M. Fitzgerald The Croxton Play of the Sacrament paradoxically enacts anxieties about the propriety of Passion drama. Framing the play's central action—the Jews' testing of the Communion wafer in a parody of the Passion—with the story of a Christian merchant who enables or even sponsors...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... impure women and Jewish men, and believed to be a carrier of the disease. The perceived threat of leprous blood to Christian bodily integrity was played out in atropaic social rituals and in widespread defamations against lepers, women, and Jews as devourers or cannibals. This study claims that such...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 89–117.
Published: 01 January 2010
... confessional divide, in a deep suspicion of, as well as a longing for, the possibilities of satisfacere , making or feeling “enough” in matters of spiritual restitution. In The Merchant of Venice , this fraught understanding of penitential experience takes special shape around the Jew Shylock. Shylock's...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2001) 31 (3): 507–560.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Lee Patterson Yale University New Haven, Connecticut The Jews are for us the living words of Scripture. They are dispersed all over the world so that by expiating their crime they may be everywhere the living witnesses of our redemption...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2003) 33 (2): 281–309.
Published: 01 May 2003
... Play of the Sacrament, in which the Jews of the play had been carefully costumed in turbans and flowing garments according to the orientalizing conventions of some manuscript illuminations. This strikes me as a mistake, for such costuming prejudges some of the most interesting questions about the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2006) 36 (1): 3–34.
Published: 01 January 2006
...,” a “Jew.”3 They named such folk “Judaizers” or “minim,” respectively, and attempted to declare as out of bounds their beliefs and practices, their very identities. Heresiologists don’t describe and classify heresies so much as pro- duce them as such, or perhaps more subtly put, in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 165–174.
Published: 01 January 2001
... ethical restraints of Catholic universalism, have been more or less pernicious. What do these essays have to say about this? Perhaps not enough. Jews, for example, would seem to be a group on which these articles would focus considerable attention. A people...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 459–462.
Published: 01 September 2011
... continued throughout the late Middle Ages and into the early modern period. Spain, as is well known, witnessed a drive for religious purity in the late medieval and early modern periods, most notably with the defeat of the Muslim emirate of Granada in 1492 and with the expulsion of the Jews from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 471–492.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Damascus in the eighth repeat as though still current lists of “Messalians, ” which some argue went back to the Žfth-century councils. 23 Heretics and Jews are mentioned in one breath, as though tarred with the same brush even if not quite identical, and fur- thermore the accusation of being a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 657–698.
Published: 01 September 2012
... [gentiles] who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ. For he is our peace: in his flesh he has made two groups [Jews and gentiles] into one and has broken down the dividing wall, that is, the hostility between us. He has abolished the law with its...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 201–221.
Published: 01 January 2009
... between Jews and Christians. The S. Mark Taper Foundation Imprint in Jewish Studies. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007. xiii, 299 pp. $39.95. 208  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 39.1 / 2009 Boucher, Philip P. France and the American Tropics to 1700: Tropics of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 47–89.
Published: 01 January 2003
... early medieval anti-Jewish polemics was that the Jews were unable to read figurally, that, unlike Christians, who understood the Old Testament as a prefiguration of the New Testament, Jews were bound to the literal letter of the Old Testament and unable to penetrate its deeper spiritual significance.23...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 159–195.
Published: 01 January 2015
... thus fundamentally outside of, normative Christian cul- ture in Renaissance Italy, these aberrant actions were also feared as insidious threats from within. Child-­killing was often presented as an unnatural deed committed only by outsiders like Jews and witches, yet it was also thought to be an...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2016
... square some of the claims about caritas and consensus in medieval Christianity against the appalling treatment of Jews by the same church. Judaism occupies a precarious place in Gregory’s narrative. The Jews have their own orthodoxy and heterodoxy (55) but are nevertheless subject to a medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2009
... a citizen of Toledo, Damián de Vegas, she focuses on the uniquely Iberian identity category of the converso, or converted Jew, and its religious, social, and racial implications. Given that conversos were Jews by blood, these converts were considered by skeptical Christians as danger- ously...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 403–412.
Published: 01 September 2008
... God’s favor, the wide- spread derogation of the disease in religious and political discourse suggests the communal need to guard against (presumed) contagion, and to identify lepers with other marginalized groups, especially impure women and Jews. According to Zimmerman, these groups were linked...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 225–248.
Published: 01 January 2004
... University Press, 2003. xix, 330 pp. $29.95. [Latin texts with facing-page translations of the lives of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio, those of Socrates and Seneca, and excerpts from On Famous men of Great Age and Against the Jews and the Gentiles.] 228 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies...