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jerusalem

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2019) 49 (2): 295–317.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Emma Lipton The York Memorandum Books feature both legal documents and dramatic records, suggesting that civic drama was defined by its engagement with legal as well as religious and guild practices. This essay argues that York’s Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem uses the legal paradigms of charter and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 23–45.
Published: 01 January 2003
... Arcadius to all the churches of the East, creating a highway of sanctity from Jerusalem to Constantinople. For Vigilantius to condemn Jerome and Jerusalem, he must also condemn the emperor and Constantinople; likewise, for the emper- ors in the capital to claim religious dominion to complement their...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 617–643.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Babel; in the Troy section, the monumental city gates which come to be adorned with the sepulchre of Hector; in the Alexander section, the sacred objects carried by the high priest as he confronts the conquering Mace- donian at the gates of Jerusalem. These iconic forms, emphasized both in text...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 31–42.
Published: 01 January 2009
... biblical texts must also be situated within the context of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation. For Prot- estants, of course, the fall of Jerusalem “foresaw the fall of the new Romish ‘Babylon,’ ” while from the Catholic perspective, “the sins of the people of Jerusalem, which led to the city’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 539–560.
Published: 01 September 2006
... of distance and an interpretive view of otherness. Jerusalem sits at the dead center of most medieval mappaemundi and conventional navigation maps. Thus it serves as an anchor to the cen- trifugal pull to the outer lands — the nether regions of fire and ice, and the nearby Earthly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 585–618.
Published: 01 September 2006
... mappaemundi, the known world is divided into three continents (Europe, Africa, and Asia) encircled by ocean (see fig. 3). The Middle Ages inherited this schema from classical geography, but the form came to carry typological meaning; Jerusalem replaced Rome at the center of the system, and the form’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 463–485.
Published: 01 September 2011
... their regional background. The authors of the three other eye-­witness accounts all came from different parts of France, and, in all likelihood, had little or no contact with Muslims before they began their journey to Jerusalem. Consequently, these men were receptive to polemical attacks against...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 159–195.
Published: 01 January 2015
... — who was driven to eat her child by hunger-­induced madness amid the horrors of the Siege of Jerusalem in 70 CE — the painting omits any reference to famine or other deprivation; all it takes for wives and mothers to become cannibalistic child-­murderers, the visual evidence tells us, is a bout...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 515–544.
Published: 01 September 2011
... and Early Modern Studies / 41.3 / 2011 lens of this regional and national frontier, the knight errant becomes the Mediterranean traveler par excellence. As has been observed, Pero Tafur’s treatment of Jerusalem places particular emphasis on the city’s chivalric past. As is the case...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 197–228.
Published: 01 May 2008
... erations besides the religious: artistic, cultural, political, and psychosocial. One can see the complex interplay of these diverse considerations not only in such common practices as the devout reimaginings of the Passion (Margery Kempe’s in Jerusalem, for example), but in something more unusual...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 9–55.
Published: 01 January 2007
..., and Malta, and took possession of them. They pressed on against the shores of Syria during this interval, and took pos- session of Tripoli, Ascalon, Tyre and Acro. They gained control over all the seaports of Syria. They conquered Jerusalem and built there a church...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 419–435.
Published: 01 September 2003
..., which she tells in a lengthy Žrst-person narrative. She describes her life of insatiable desire for sex, culminating with her seduction of pilgrims about to sail for Jerusalem for the festival of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross. Having offered the favors of her body as payment for the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 657–698.
Published: 01 September 2012
... of Hippo, as simultaneously portals into the heavenly Jerusalem: Why are the apostles and prophets [of Eph. foundations? Because their authority supports our weakness. Why are they portals? Because through them we enter the kingdom of God; for they proclaim it...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 479–492.
Published: 01 September 2006
... exemplars have not generally been regarded as centrally pertinent to utopianism itself. To be sure scholars of early modern utopia do not exclude the medieval period entirely: they typically cite such concepts as the Golden Age, the New Jerusalem, or monasticism (widely acknowledged as important to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 147–172.
Published: 01 January 2004
... Responsionum expresses, as I have suggested, the emerging geography of power between papal Rome and postconversion England. A momentary qualification here may help avoid misunderstanding. If Jerusalem stood at the center of the earth in Bede’s cosmology, as it did for his contemporaries, Rome...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 655–673.
Published: 01 September 2013
..., Denys, trans. and ed. Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187 – 1291. Crusade Texts in Translation, vol. 23. Farnham, Surrey: Ash- gate, 2012. xxiv, 463 pp.; 12 figs., 2 tables. eur 124.95. [Translations of Latin, French, and Greek pilgrimage texts.] Qushayri, ‘Abd al-­Karim ibn Hawazin...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 147–164.
Published: 01 January 2001
... understanding of the journey itself. For although there is much initial discussion of Jerusalem as the goal or end- point of the narrator’s journey, as the narrative goes on to unfold, it becomes harder and harder to recognize Jerusalem as anything more than an...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 47–89.
Published: 01 January 2003
... of good hermeneutic work as crucially reliant on both literal and symbolic reading is, moreover, part of its broader char- acterization of the recovery of meaning as complex process rather than sin- gular event, a point highlighted by the poem’s expansive rendition of Elene’s voyage to Jerusalem...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 79–112.
Published: 01 January 2001
... for an armed pilgrimage to Jerusalem set out in the certainty that they were going to liberate the Holy Land and protect their fellow Christians. Once in the East, however, they met with much more than they had bargained for. Almost immediately, their relations...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 571–595.
Published: 01 September 2009
... familiar, will likely fall on deaf ears. If the learned authority of the sermon- ists cannot reform the sinners, how should a poet expect to do so? The answer to this question might be found in Thomas Nashe’s Christ’s Tears Over Jerusalem (1593), a prime example of a text written by a secular...