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interpretation of bodily signs

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 9–32.
Published: 01 January 2024
... allowed one to grasp the inclinations of the human soul through the interpretation of bodily signs, Baldus made express reference to the treatise then attributed to Aristotle (“Aristoteles in libello de phinosomia”). 53 It thus highlighted for the jurist and judge the importance of relying...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 193–214.
Published: 01 May 2021
... the illusory nature of signs, as opposed to reparative reading practices or the “hermeneutics of trust,” which calls for restoring their meaning. In a climate when discretio spirituum came to prominence, Julian responded to the suspicious techniques developed to interpret women's visions and bodies...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 137–163.
Published: 01 January 2024
.... 4 Indeed, early modern judicial process privileged the interpretation of bodily signs at every stage of its investigation. Reading corporeal signs—what John Martin has called the “rhetorical forensics of the body”—helped the judge determine the reliability of testimony given before him. 5 While...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 113–135.
Published: 01 January 2024
... thoroughly vindicates herself, then this is new evidence, since naturally they say that she would not be so eloquent if she were not a witch. 86 Moreover, even less skeptical judges were cognizant of the challenge of reading and interpreting physical signs, as well as the fact that such bodily signs...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 317–343.
Published: 01 May 2011
.... Her consistent advice not to desire anything in particular — even if one wishes to be virtuous — shows us the problematic nature in any overidentification with works and our own poten- tially conflicting interpretation that may conflate a woman’s bodily perfor- mances with a personal subject...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 403–417.
Published: 01 September 2003
... / 33.3 / 2003 have one or more words inscribed on his forehead so that all may know his crime.”15 But if his mistress is the one who will inscribe that “knowledge, ” will she be able to control the interpretation of the sign? Indeed, the initia- tive for the tattoo is Gastron’s own...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 611–613.
Published: 01 September 2022
... / January 2024 Physiognomy was, as is well known, one of the most influential disciplines of the Renaissance. Based on the interpretation of bodily signs to read inner moral and intellectual inclinations, physiognomy developed in the West from the twelfth century and quickly acquired the status...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 403–405.
Published: 01 May 2022
... by Manuela Bragagnolo and John Jeffries Martin Volume 54 / Number 1 / January 2024 Physiognomy was, as is well known, one of the most influential disciplines of the Renaissance. Based on the interpretation of bodily signs to read inner moral and intellectual inclinations, physiognomy developed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
... and chief allegorist of the sixteenth century are scarce. Through an examination of these texts, this article argues that both works share an identifiable bodily epistemology that positions knowledge production in the bodies of all, including women and lower-status men. Even as this bodily epistemology...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 271–303.
Published: 01 May 2007
... the spiritual life as the life apart and would interpret scripture allegori- cally. Historically, the allegorization of “the creatures” in nature developed out of the allegorical exegesis of the objects and creatures mentioned in the Bible.22 Luther mocked Origen for “making allegories out of the trees...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 467–491.
Published: 01 September 2008
... treatment. Our main aim is to focus attention on these nonprofessional voices, on the words of patients themselves or those who, like them, were not trained in medicine. Approaching our subject through this interpretative framework, we provide an example of medical-cultural analysis that documents voices...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 629–651.
Published: 01 September 2016
... has been consistently interpreted, including in the most recent editions and critical work, as referring to bodily excretion.14 This passage has been celebrated as “one of Julian’s most clearly ‘grotesque’ images,” and applauded for epitomizing her immanent theology of God’s thorough, down...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 1–7.
Published: 01 January 2024
... in the state of the body, and contrariwise an alteration in bodily form produces an alteration of the soul.” 1 This key insight rendered the Physiognomonica a work of particular intellectual excitement in universities where, over the course of the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries, scholars...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... of empty nostalgia or mere convention Sara- cens continued to inhabit the fantasies of times and places no longer pas- sionately invested in the destruction of Islam. My aim in this essay is there- fore threefold: to trace briefly the genealogy of a racialized bodily otherness...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 289–314.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., reading, or listening) functions in a way similar to the rite of baptism by evoking the saint's protection of mothers and infants during childbirth. More so than other late medieval versions of her life, the SEL life of Margaret connects bodily and salvific suffering, emphasizing the shared experience...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 121–146.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., women like Costanza were caught between biological knowing and representational consequence. By interpreting the literary representations of a mind-­womb connection as inherently ambivalent and dialectical, we can better understand the lived bodily experience of Costanza and other women in her...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 57–87.
Published: 01 January 2024
... to interpreting a dream, since both practices make use of “conjectural” signs. In his Somniorum Synesiorum libri (1562), Cardano contends that the whole creation, including dreams, offers three basic sorts of signs: “propria” [particular], “communia” [common], and “coniecturalia,” which are the least clear...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 331–373.
Published: 01 May 2009
..., exclusive sign of masculinity. Simons / Manliness and Bodily Fluids  339 Urine, semen, water, wine, and wit Understanding the importance of the masculinized mode of urination casts a different light on certain representations of ejaculation, for the two emis...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 253–283.
Published: 01 May 2008
... of Perfection, describes the inner transfor- mations wrought by the sacrament of penance as being by definition unfelt and unseen: But he that is reformed in his soule bi the sacrament of penaunce to the image of God, he feeleth noo chaungynge in himsilf, neithir in his bodili kynde...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (1): 9–35.
Published: 01 January 2021
... fires, which is confirmed by Owein s experience. H. notes the unknowability of the exact degree of punishment for various sins; however, visionaries have transmitted certain signs similar to the corporeal for the demonstration of the spiri- tual. 40 Still following Hugh, H. explains bodily-seeming...