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humanist debate with Thomas More

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2017
.... His dictionary thereby transforms misleading medieval fables into something more “fitting” for England in the early days of the Reformation. Yet similitude remains problematic for Elyot; replacing the medieval Brutus legend with a story that privileges the humanist reconstruction of the illegible...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 335–371.
Published: 01 May 2007
... about this debate, but the anonymity itself is interesting. I think it functions as strategic insulation, as does the Latin, the fictional presentation of political theory, and the framework of narrators in the Utopia of Thomas More, Ras- Holstun...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 157–179.
Published: 01 January 2012
... earlier, but that of things is the more important.”20 Such a conviction quickly developed into a truism among humanists, who constantly warned not to concentrate on words and style at the expense of things and content. As Thomas Elyot puts it in The Boke Named the Gouernour (1531), one...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 1–12.
Published: 01 January 2012
.... For Luther, education could not convey genuine righteousness; it could provide nothing more than, on the one hand, a tool to secure external conformity, or, on the other, an external occasion for God’s transformative work. Nevertheless, in the early modern period humanist education won the day...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 431–451.
Published: 01 September 2021
... Salem and Bizance dialogue thus prompted print readers to understand themselves as, and indeed to become, partisan members of a public speaking in and about the debate. Copyright © 2021 by Duke University Press 2021 Christopher St. German's Salem and Bizance humanist debate with Thomas More...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 271–303.
Published: 01 May 2007
...” and what Gleason calls his “moral absolutism.”41 Colet corresponded with Ficino and consistently asceticized Ficino’s teachings.42 The humanists are closest to Luther, by and large, in their low “Epicurean” moments rather than their high Platonic ones.43 The great humanist call was for a more...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 487–519.
Published: 01 September 2013
... is obviously a continuation of the debate between the humanist and workshop conceptions of painting that Renaissance theo- rists inherited from the medieval novella. The fact that Boccaccio’s and Sac- chetti’s vernacular prose works enter into discussions of the history of art theory as little more than...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 557–571.
Published: 01 September 2015
... or in its narrative substance) and are more a variation on existing prophetic practices. When the sortes Virgilianae resurface in the Renaissance, the prac- tice is transformed and connected centrally to the material and narrative text of the Aeneid itself, and to its piercing, excerption...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 305–330.
Published: 01 May 2009
... into a culture of metatextual debate, for example, by listening to sermons and homilies, Spolsky / Literacy after Iconoclasm  317 would make learning to read itself more attractive and easier. This is why, as Brian Stock has noted, cultural evolution would thus...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 335–360.
Published: 01 May 2022
..., then, the universities were training more members of the political and economic elite in a humanistic arts curriculum than ever before. On the other hand, they were also educating more students for careers as parish clergymen meant to preach God's word to ordinary men and women than at any other point in their history...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 261–280.
Published: 01 May 2003
... to Thomas More’s Dialogue (Cambridge, 1850), 143, first cited in Hamlet in Purgatory, 35. 20 Greenblatt, Hamlet in Purgatory, 86. See James Simpson’s excellent essay, “The Rule of Medieval Imagination” as a useful counterpoint to Greenblatt’s claims, in Image, Icon- oclasm, and Idolatry...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 313–334.
Published: 01 May 2022
.... More broadly, Vegio's distichs and epigrams display a playful, frivolous, yet paradoxically principled aspect of Virgilian reception in the period. Attending to these understudied qualities allows us to more accurately reconstruct the controversy between Vegio and his literary associates over poetic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (1): 25–54.
Published: 01 January 2023
... of Greek Christianity confessional identity theological debates Anglo-Hellenic religious relations during the Reformation era have received very little scholarly attention. It is striking that early modern Western writers knew and talked considerably more about non-Western forms of Christianity than...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (1): 55–85.
Published: 01 January 2023
... Jewish authorities as more active, and less mediated, participants in early modern debate. PHa@div.duke.edu Copyright © 2023 by Duke University Press 2023 English Reformation Hebrew scholarship Jewish sources and traditions biblical exegesis ecclesiastical politics When did...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 477–492.
Published: 01 September 2020
... Modern Europe, which initiated a necessary and meaning- ful assessment of diplomatic studies in premodern Europe.1 The call for a more nuanced study of diplomacy in the period brought together a group of scholars with a common interest: their essays test and broaden conven- tional frameworks...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 125–151.
Published: 01 January 2018
... texts associated with Hippocrates, Galen, and Oribasius, and more recent ones by Giovanni di Vigo and Jean Tagault, the visual archive conveyed information about the treatment of fractures and dislocations, promoted a view of anatomy as medically useful, and helped to organize the medical field...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 635–657.
Published: 01 September 2011
..., Justin K. Infectious Ideas: Contagion in Premodern Islamic and Christian Thought in the Western Mediterranean. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011. xx, 279 pp. $60.00. Terpstra, Nicholas. Lost Girls: Sex and Death in Renaissance Florence. Balti- more: Johns Hopkins University Press...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
..., the renaming of a geographic feature, a territory, a human settlement, or even a city street can give rise to heated political debate. Names, clearly, are much more than simple marks of dif- ference by which the world is categorized. Rather, they are invested with deep-­seated patterns of meaning...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 173–195.
Published: 01 January 2010
..., and Lit- erature 19 (1944): 561 – 67; Erwin Panofsky, Renaissance and Renascences in Western Art (1960; repr. New York: Harper and Row, 1972). More recently, there is Thomas Greene’s The Light in Troy: Imitation and Discovery in Renaissance Poetry (New Haven, Conn.: Yale...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2016
... the Utopians. In the gesture to an ideal medieval Christianity, even in his efforts to corroborate this vision with academic evidence, the book explores ways of explaining the present without recourse to “history” alone. Gregory stands in the company of Thomas More here (whose absence from...