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human fate

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 57–87.
Published: 01 January 2024
... between metoposcopy, focused on the upper part of the head, and contemporary views of human intellectual faculties that granted this science special significance. amaggi@uchicago.edu Copyright © 2024 by Duke University Press 2024 Girolamo Cardano early modern metoposcopy divination human...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 69–92.
Published: 01 January 2022
...Renée R. Trilling The Old English poem known as The Fortunes of Men offers a catalogue of potential fates, both good and bad, that can befall a person in the early medieval world, from being eaten by a wolf to thriving as a poet. Straining against the limits of human knowledge about the future...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 January 2022
... by Duke University Press 2022 This content is made freely available by the publisher. It may not be redistributed or altered. All rights reserved. medieval and early modern English poetry catastrophe human fate literary form structure and disorder [S]wiche ben the customes...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (3): 559–592.
Published: 01 September 2010
... fate of the soul was vigorously defended by William Tyndale in his debate with Thomas More.2 Yet mor- talism became a significant feature of the continental “radical Reformation” rather than of the Calvinist theology that shaped later-­sixteenth-­century English Protestantism: Calvin...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 257–281.
Published: 01 May 2009
... of man, he says he will make the Four Daughters of God kiss and “sauen al þe folk on londe.”9 If this were read with a wanton disregard of context, it could suggest a promise of universal salvation, since the atonement was made for all “humanity”; but any such suggestion is squashed by Christ’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 571–580.
Published: 01 September 2002
... Oedipus becomes tyrant of Thebes because he answers the riddle of the Sphinx. The riddle is: What goes on four legs in the morning, two legs at noon, and three legs in the evening? Oedipus defeats the Sphinx by guess- ing the answer correctly: humans. As babies, they crawl on hands and feet. If all...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 January 2015
... been persuaded to think so.16 Less fortunate than Peter was a woman, whose fate is reported by Galbert of Bruges for the year 1128. While Count Thierry of Flanders crossed a bridge on his way to Lille, the woman ran into the river and splashed him with water. Galbert recounts...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 445–476.
Published: 01 September 2001
...), and Isaac’s second affirmation of his father’s will (246– 48). In the crucial passage in which Isaac learns his fate, the Chester dramatist balances the participants’ dia- logue. Britten shifts the balance to Abraham, drastically shortening the dia- logue that emphasizes the boy’s growing terror (263–85...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 503–531.
Published: 01 September 2022
...; and many of them are his own neighbors and friends, disclosed now as creatures of hell. But even in these narratives of reprobation, Dante persistently represents the dynamic humanity of these damned souls. Their fates could and should have been otherwise, he tends to emphasize, and even their eternal...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 313–334.
Published: 01 May 2022
..., arresting allusion here is to a plangent moment, Aeneid 11.96–98, in the words of Aeneas to the fallen Pallas: “nos alias hinc ad lacrimas eadem horrida belli / fata vocant: salve aeternum mihi, maxime Palla, / aeternumque vale” [The grim fate of war summons me from here to other tears: hail to you...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 269–305.
Published: 01 May 2012
... meanings of a common human preoccupation — that is, the creation of chilling partnerships between death and virginity. Imaginings of “Death and the Maiden” have a long lineage in Western civilizations. Greeks spoke of the maiden Persephone, abducted by Hades and made queen of the underworld. Romans...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 247–274.
Published: 01 May 2000
... realizes, as he beholds her “bodi, pat was so white y-core, / Wip . . . nailes . . . al totore” (105–6). His public image has been demolished. Why do the two worthy maidens deal such devastation to Orfeo’s reputation? Probably they are the unwitting agents of Fate: young women terrified out...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 407–432.
Published: 01 May 2009
... women make the best of con- temporary property and other power relations in their own self-interest, but rather those that reject oppressive social norms altogether, we might move closer to understanding how early modern women could progressively imag- ine a more generally humane social order...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Valeria Finucci In 1543 Andreas Vesalius published his landmark work of anatomy, On the Fabric of the Human Body , which delved inside the human body to see what made it work. Vesalius’s illustrations of body parts were based on what could be seen with the eyes through the practice of dissection...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 93–117.
Published: 01 January 2022
... and fate, to consider the unexpected forms that poetic representations of catastrophe take in a premodern poem. Copyright © 2022 by Duke University Press 2022 Geoffrey Chaucer The Knight's Tale catastrophe and survival trauma and consolation poetic form There is no document...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 147–172.
Published: 01 January 2004
... that tellingly reverses our usual understanding of center and periphery. Being a missionary in heathen lands, on the political and religious periphery, meant becoming central to the dynamic of the Christian faith by emulating the most honored of human exempla in Chris- tian history, the original apostles who...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 141–161.
Published: 01 January 2007
.... If the remote and uncharted islands Odysseus encounters on his way back home are imagi- nary, they are carefully conceived and form a recognizable grouping or archipelago. They provide a scale of the possibilities of human life for the Greek who was ever, as Aristotle defined him in his Politics...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 173–195.
Published: 01 January 2010
.... However, as the action of the play slowly unfolds, so too our sense of the value that might inhere in the form of chivalric manhood embodied by Palamon and Arcite becomes ever more troubled. Certainly the fate of the Jailer’s Daughter stigmatizes the fascination with such nobility as utterly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (1): 25–54.
Published: 01 January 2023
... supremacy and the papacy. Secondly, Pole uses the fate of the Greek Orthodox Church as an ominous warning to enemies of Rome. 28 He claims in De Unitate that the Greeks had accepted the papacy very loyally both in the early church and under the Byzantine emperors, alleging that the acts...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 1–7.
Published: 01 January 2024
... of personality in the visual and literary arts of the period. But nowhere was its influence greater than in the practice of criminal law. This special issue explores the varied ways that jurists and judges drew on theories—ancient and modern—of how to read the human body, the face especially, in order to help...