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human body

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Amanda Taylor The sixteenth century witnessed the publication of landmark texts on anatomy and allegory: De humani corporis fabrica or On the Fabric of the Human Body by Andreas Vesalius in 1543 and The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser, published first in 1590. Each of these texts has received...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Valeria Finucci In 1543 Andreas Vesalius published his landmark work of anatomy, On the Fabric of the Human Body , which delved inside the human body to see what made it work. Vesalius’s illustrations of body parts were based on what could be seen with the eyes through the practice of dissection...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
.... 12  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 48.1 / 2018 “What’s in a name?” Comparing the geography of the human body to terrestrial geography was something of a commonplace in the so-­called “age of discovery” in Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In recent years...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 79–104.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Jennifer F. Kosmin Although Vesalius, like his contemporaries, had only extremely limited opportunities to examine or dissect the human gravid uterus, it is the image of the anatomist laying bare the (un)pregnant female body and revealing its secrets that graces the title page of the 1543 edition...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 141–165.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Richard Sugg In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, human physiology was mediated by the vital spirits. These fine vapors of heated blood and air not only linked body and soul, but were central to processes and ideas of generation, sight, mind-body unity, muscle and nerve action, and emotion...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 585–615.
Published: 01 September 2014
... of the stones that ornament them, the waters of these fountains exercised an agency that eschewed human control and healed human bodies. Tales of the miraculous power of fountains endured into the nine- teenth century when they were recorded by itinerant folklorists, many of whom were Breton...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... — is this due to his corporeal or spiritual self? And even if they do not fly about, do animals even have souls? The strain upon my language in framing my inquiry — “wolf-­soul” as opposed to simply “wolf,” Shylock-­the-­human as opposed to Shylock-­the-­ body-­housing-­a-­wolf-­soul...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2019) 49 (3): 609–631.
Published: 01 September 2019
... to enter into a long-standing conversation about how the physical environment potentially influenced the human will. A scalar logic of nature was embraced by some of these popular writers and rebuffed by others, depending on their view of how the soul was situated with respect to the material body...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 105–124.
Published: 01 January 2018
... be attested with particular clarity in the writings of the men who carried out the anatomical revolution. Even though anatomists had been dissecting human bodies since at least the fourteenth century, what makes the Renaissance exceptional is a combina- tion of several factors: the standardization...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 125–151.
Published: 01 January 2018
... in order “to know precisely how it happens that one suffers on the inside.” But, he continues: I will say, ardently believing what I say is true, that I have never known a man who has seen so many anatomies of living human bodies as I have seen in different wars, where I have...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 41–59.
Published: 01 January 2018
... to add weight to what Vesalius is saying.17 Their visual account of the human body not only con- firms the truth of what Vesalius reveals in his dissection, but in turn adds new material and also prepares the audience for the verbal exposition that is to come. It is an integral part of the whole...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 669–671.
Published: 01 September 2016
... The Languages of Anatomy Edited by Valeria Finucci Volume 48 / Number 1 / January 2018 In 1543 Andreas Vesalius published his landmark work of anatomy, On the Fabric of the Human Body, which delved inside of the human body to see what made it work. Vesalius’s illustrations of body parts were based...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 451–453.
Published: 01 May 2016
... Edited by Valeria Finucci Volume 48 / Number 1 / January 2018 In 1543 Andreas Vesalius published his landmark work of anatomy, On the Fabric of the Human Body, which delved inside of the human body to see what made it work. Vesalius’s illustrations of body parts were based on what could be seen...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 69–92.
Published: 01 January 2022
... a catalogue of death that is stunning in both its variety and its comprehensiveness. 1 Alliterative long lines illustrate, in often excruciating detail, some of the many ways the human body can meet its ultimate end: one is eaten by a wolf, another is killed in a storm, a third dies in battle. A person...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 377–402.
Published: 01 May 2020
... an inevitable outpour- ing of the human body an outgoing, to borrow Hutchinson s own term for her poetic composition that occurs whether willed or not.15 More than simply refining Order and Disorder s portrayal of the female body, this claim helps us rethink characterizations of the poem s rigid piety...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 629–651.
Published: 01 September 2016
..., the “blessed kinde that he toke of the maiden.” Forms of mediation are humbled before the reality of the divine proximity. The Incarnation means that, in some sense, the human is closer to God than she is to herself, body and soul. Julian suggests that without this realization we are indeed prone...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 427–431.
Published: 01 September 2002
... of clothing and the physical object to which they apply, the body. Understanding that the fundamental concern shared between King Lear and Oedipus is the nature of the aging human body, that is, the answer to the Sphinx’s riddle, Stallbyrass points out that Lear ends up doing the opposite of what he had...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (1): 93–115.
Published: 01 January 2011
... – 1624) is the depiction of corporal violence. Indeed, the human body takes center stage in the debate over Spanish colonization of the New World, from juridical justifications for conquest and slavery to the legiti- macy of mass slaughter through a just war. Significantly, in De Bry’s Amer- ica...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 253–284.
Published: 01 May 2022
..., but some animal body forms have no human equivalent: “aucunes bestes ont esquailles si comme le limacon et la tortue et le herison a espines et cheval a queue et homme n'a nulles de ces choses” (272v) [some beasts have shells like the snail and the tortoise, and the hedgehog has spines, and the horse has...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 457–467.
Published: 01 September 2014
... attention to how the human body is formed like a cross. A Middle English lyric recounting Helen’s discovery of the true cross notes that “of cros þe formast man was wroȝt, / of cros þe first of alle wifis.”12 And lollard tracts from the later Middle Ages use this image of the human body as cross...