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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 185–210.
Published: 01 May 2000
...Siân Echard © by Duke University Press 2000 House Arrest: Modern Archives, Medieval Manuscripts Siân Echard University of British Columbia...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Alexander Samson England and Spain's close ties of kinship had bound the royal houses together stretching back to the thirteenth century. In the later sixteenth century, English interest in Spanish culture, history, and politics had intensified precisely during the period when political relations...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 53–77.
Published: 01 January 2015
...Sharon T. Strocchia This essay examines suicidal behaviors in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Catholic convents in light of the new attitudes toward voluntary death emerging across Europe between 1500 and 1700. Focusing on Italy, which housed the greatest number of enclosed religious women on...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 493–518.
Published: 01 September 2002
... pattern that was often painted on the walls of small, unlicensed houses in London (instead of ale-stakes or signs that extended out from the house, like those cited above), Dekker complained: “A whole streete is in some Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 32:3, Fall 2002...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 109–144.
Published: 01 January 2002
... threat of sexual promiscuity, the city magistrates insti- tutionalized prostitution, then tried to remedy this vice through charity, and finally encouraged the reform of prostitutes by establishing Repenties houses — convents for repentant prostitutes—where Mary Magdalene was pro- moted as a central...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 519–537.
Published: 01 September 2012
... smaller and the English nuns would have included only Dorothy Clement, her younger sister Margaret Clement, Margaret’s mentor Elizabeth Woodford (the last two at the Augustinian convent of St. Ursula’s, Louvain), and six Syon women at the Birgittine house at Termonde, twenty miles northwest of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 397–453.
Published: 01 May 2006
... history meant to him. I found by looking at his chapter headings that it meant — “The Manor Court and the Methods of Open-field Agriculture . . . The Cistercians and Sheep-farming . . . The Crusades . . . The University . . . The House of Commons . . . The Hundred Years...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 379–408.
Published: 01 May 2001
... possible to quibble about the precise tallies of damage, the fire laid waste to about 436 acres, 400 streets, 89 parish churches, and 13,200 houses.7 The fire does not, however, seem to have caused many deaths. It finally burned itself out after the houses in its path...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 79–101.
Published: 01 January 2015
..., or indeed to still other persons or institutions.1 The experience of wives was especially contingent since their husbands never left their natal lineage; indeed, men’s participation in the activities and privileges of Venice’s patriciate depended on their membership in one of the houses which...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
.... This space is the normal sort that typically houses things, actions, and people, rather than Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 43:1, Winter 2013 DOI 10.1215/10829636-1902558­­   © 2013 by Duke University Press souls — a courtroom, say, or a stage, a place in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 381–404.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., became a brother at Syon Abbey around 1507, after previously serving as chaplain to the bishop of Winchester, Richard Foxe. By 1530, he had long been established as one of the house’s most prolific vernacular authors and translators. The monk “Wretch of Syon,” as he signed himself, was a well...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 615–634.
Published: 01 September 2012
... Avila, had direct ties to the question of Cistercian reform in Spain.24 In the first half of the fifteenth century, the Cistercian monasteries in the Iberian Peninsula had undergone a rigorous reform designed to abolish the corruption and worldliness that prevailed in some houses.25 After the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2002) 32 (2): 375–398.
Published: 01 May 2002
...- rant, I haue read in forme following. Deuout soules that passe this way, for Stephen Forster late Maior, heartily pray, And Dame Agnes his spouse, to God consecrate, that of pitie this house made for Londoners in Ludgate . . . This place [i.e., plaque...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 173–190.
Published: 01 January 2013
... London, the commodification of space was rooted in a medieval system of burgage tenure, but a booming population placed unprecedented demands on the property market, and houses were increasingly subdivided and sublet to lodgers.2 As Vanessa Harding notes, “When there is . . . a continued demand...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 523–548.
Published: 01 September 2004
...” of build- ers in the past, particularly in Lancashire and “the north,” that has allowed cities such as Manchester to “have grown up anyhow, and . . . become mere rabbit warrens of disorderly alleys and overcrowded houses.” Yet it’s not exactly imagination that makes the diff erence. Far more...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 373–404.
Published: 01 May 2004
... aristocratic lying-in were borrowed from the general stock of house- hold linens and furnishings. Rather, certain furnishings were reserved solely for childbirth. The hangings were not to depict imagery that might adversely influence the maternal imagination and produce birthmarks or monstrous births.20...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 597–614.
Published: 01 September 2012
..., Épinlieu received a donation in alms from Wautier, seigneur of Lens, of eight bonniers of land. According to the text of the charter, which was sealed by Wautier, the donation “took place at Lens, in his house.” Among the witnesses listed at the end of the document were his brother Hugo, several...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2004
... traveled with their families, and so, instead of an Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 34:1, Winter 2004. Copyright © by Duke University Press / 2004 / $2.00. immediate mingling of Arabs and Iberians through intermarriage, the house- holds of each...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2002) 32 (2): 227–268.
Published: 01 May 2002
... Liber Eliensis, which is a compilation of deeds, charters, privileges, and estate litigation designed to recount the history of the Benedictine monastery at Ely, England. This chronicle begins with a book-length vita of Æthelthryth, who is the house’s founder and patron saint, and it features...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 January 2009
... ultraroyalist Sir Thomas Urquhart’s translation of Rabelais.8 Gayton’s book might well be aligned with this interest, despite Gayton’s loyalties. Ribaldry turns in fact to urgent issues in the religious politics of Gayton’s England: He had in his house a Woman about forty yeares old, &c...