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historiography of enclosed religious women

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (1): 141–159.
Published: 01 January 2021
... profiled in Women Medievalists and the Academy, ed. Jane Chance (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2005). medieval pilgrimage writing imagined pilgrimage historiography of enclosed religious women power and resistance theory Copyright © 2021 Duke University Press 2021 ...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 53–77.
Published: 01 January 2015
...Sharon T. Strocchia This essay examines suicidal behaviors in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Catholic convents in light of the new attitudes toward voluntary death emerging across Europe between 1500 and 1700. Focusing on Italy, which housed the greatest number of enclosed religious women...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 1–12.
Published: 01 January 2020
... textual production but that this very fictionality supplied an array of possibilities for literary composition, unlimited by gender. John McCafferty, Danielle Clarke, and Jaime Goodrich illuminate issues of translation and reuse, centering on women religious as public fig- ures and textual producers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... experience of the religiously sanctioned social marginalization that other women and social groups (such as Jews, prostitutes, and peasants) had to endure. Hrots- vit had the luxury to play the part of a social inferior rather than the mis- fortune to live it.19 Hrotsvit, like her religious house...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (3): 597–614.
Published: 01 September 2012
... passionate, and largely unenforced attempts to strictly enclose nuns.10 Building upon legislation that attempted, but failed, to restrict the movement of individuals across the cloister wall, Periculoso rhetorically posi- tioned religious women at the center of the issue, invoking their conduct...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2006) 36 (2): 397–453.
Published: 01 May 2006
..., it is the process of traveling — the business of not being stable or enclosed as religious women — that gets them into trouble with their own side, for although each early on nurtured fantasies of martyrdom, as we have noted, each was most actively persecuted by Catholic authorities.73 Margery spends a good...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 109–144.
Published: 01 January 2002
... hagiographic model of penance. Yet despite their marginal status within the city and their vulnera- bility to male forms of power, I show how these women adopted—and were remarkably successful, even in worldly terms—a religious life accord- ing to male clerical forms. The Repenties appropriated...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 601–633.
Published: 01 September 2011
... doors often imagined enclosed institutions as this-­worldly brothels rather than the “secluded harems of God,” advocated in the rules of one newly reformed Benedictine convent in 1527.51 Moreover, post-­Tridentine Venice witnessed an upsurge in more or less willing encloistered women, as new...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 633–657.
Published: 01 September 2020
... against the pope and Spain was inextricably shaped by the religious and political contexts within which it occurred and stressed James s commitment to his most coveted foreign policy. De la Fuente, serving as stand- in ambassador during Don Diego Sarmiento de Acuña, Count of Gondomar s absence...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 487–516.
Published: 01 September 2017
... from Civil War historiography, but also from a special interest in the King James Bible, whose oppositional relationship to the Geneva Bible has profoundly colored its Elizabethan reception history. In 1604, calling for a new translation, King James took exception to the Geneva notes as “sedi...