1-20 of 37 Search Results for

historical credibility

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2019) 49 (2): 377–401.
Published: 01 May 2019
... claims— a far cry from modern audiences’ tendency to forsake the creative scholar in favor of the seductive bullshitter. Copyright © 2019 by Duke University Press 2019 John Dee Brytanici Imperii Limites English historiography historical credibility politics of imperial expansion ...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 603–628.
Published: 01 September 2016
... irrelevant to his historical analyses. Maintaining that The Unintended Reformation amounts to a declensionist narrative, this essay scrutinizes the model of historical causation underlying Gregory's narrative. Avoiding the pattern of numerous earlier critiques, which contest the book from a liberal-secular...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 555–582.
Published: 01 September 2016
... corresponding issue of power struggle within church and state; (2) the discovery of the “racial and religious” other and the resultant issues endemic to Spanish colonialism, which had the unintended effect of vitiating the fabric of Catholicism's credibility; (3) the significance of immigration and refugee...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2016
... periodization of western history, that is both committed to historical research and attentive to the theoretical models shaping such research. Gregory's The Unintended Reformation not only meets this criteria but goes beyond by unfolding an immensely erudite narrative of modernity and its sources. It is a work...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 635–655.
Published: 01 September 2012
... community life.34 Thus, the English nuns’ historical writing was focused 640  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 42.3 / 2012 very clearly upon the cloister, and other events were described mostly insofar as they impacted upon it. A Bridgettine account of the French wars of reli- gion and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of Albina, Brutus, and Arthur allows Mantel to introduce some of the novel’s central themes: the power of old stories, the mutability and slip- periness of historical narratives, the return of the repressed, the violence of new beginnings. Whether they want to be or not, the Tudors, Wolsey, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 125–141.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., fictional and historical. As we disassemble these boundaries, we return in some ways to the textual approach of premodern and early modern readers. In sixteenth- century Europe, the categories of history and fiction were ill-defined, but became increasingly theorized. Attempts were made to police the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 315–344.
Published: 01 May 2008
... account for the highly charged aspect of the dramatic imperson- ation? Of what use is the text to us if it has no credibility as a social-historical record? Lescarbot’s native may not be credible, but he is conceivable precisely to the extent he is taken to be part of an authenticating natural scene...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2006) 36 (1): 135–168.
Published: 01 January 2006
...-historical hero par excellence. Michelangelo’s solitary and dif- ficult nature, his many unfinished works, his fascination with tombs and death — aspects deeply problematic to his paradigmatic status in the six- teenth century — were now the chief sources of interest. In this age of redis- coveries...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 165–174.
Published: 01 January 2001
... markers were part of their racial makeup. Yet, the Norman gens, as even its idolizers would have confessed, had once spoken Norse and been pagan; and it strained credibility to regard Northmen’s attacks on unarmed monks in the Viking Age as a particularly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 443–465.
Published: 01 September 2008
... Lambarde, William Camden in his Britannia (1586), and William Harrison in An Historical Description of the Island of Britain (1577, 1587) in their mix of antiquarian histories and descriptions of manners and topogra- phies only occasionally linked topology to health and illness when discussing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 283–312.
Published: 01 May 2001
... the neutral abstractions of “pure” poetry.5 The historical criticism of Book V, Canto 9, of Spenser’s Faerie Queene has thus traditionally assumed that the allegory of Mercilla’s “rich array” is somehow allied with the position Elizabeth’s government...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 143–177.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., to construct for its viewer (or reader) the artificial experience of nature. In his landmark essay “The Structuralist Activity,” Roland Barthes revisits Hegel’s historical fable on the persistence of human fascination with “the Natural in Nature” and a readily perceptible (though as yet...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 531–547.
Published: 01 September 2007
... efforts to characterize its performance and preservation as acts of historical significance. Indeed, the desire to situate the cycle historically is regularly articulated in its docu- mentary records. Promoters of the cycle misconstrued its history from the moment they began writing it. For example...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 125–156.
Published: 01 January 2000
... both European tolerance and non-European agency. English representations of Turks were often rehearsals of conventional stereotypes, but they also could and did shift to accommodate historical circumstances, even going so far as to legitimate the arming of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 405–438.
Published: 01 May 2004
... many of these women writers from the trash bin of masculinist and Whiggish historical neglect so that they are no longer “hidden from history,” in the case of seventeenth-century spiritual autobiography a strong argument can be made for the formative influence of female experience on the genre as...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 327–348.
Published: 01 May 2005
...? At stake in the doubt Weyer casts on the “true” confessions extracted from witches and in Bodin’s virulent counterattack is the broader and per- sistent problem of the credibility of confession. What guarantees the reli- ability of confession? How can one draw the line between a fi rst-person fi c...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 437–451.
Published: 01 September 2003
... facilitate the working of the illu- sion. Their presence lends credibility to the myth by connecting it with the real ascetic landscape in Egypt. Whether intentional or not, the difference between the artiŽcial landscape of the Life of Antony and the actual ascetic 440Journal of Medieval and Early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 511–529.
Published: 01 September 2007
... impulse to com- memorate, archive, and monumentalize the pictorial languages of Codex Telleriano-Remensis? Agamben underscores the need to resist institutional- izing histories most lucidly when he states, “To respond to this exigency is the only historical responsibility I feel capable of assuming...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 379–408.
Published: 01 May 2001
... existence, it sometimes feels as if we’ve got two choices: we can defend our practice as the apprecia- tion or fuller understanding of recognized authors, or as the creation of new historical knowledge. I sometimes think of the choice in these terms: love the...