1-20 of 111 Search Results for

gloss

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 561–586.
Published: 01 September 2017
...Daniel Cheely The Reformers' campaign to purge bibles of marginal glosses, finally achieved in the Authorized Version of 1611, was first achieved in the authenticated version of Latin Catholicism—the Sixtine Vulgate of 1590. Its sola scriptura format, however, did not last. Church authorities...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 293–316.
Published: 01 May 2011
...Hannah Crawforth This essay pays long overdue attention to E.K's glosses of native English words in Edmund Spenser's The Shepheardes Calender (1579). Spenser's practice of using native English words is indebted to the emerging discipline of Anglo-Saxon studies, especially to the methodology of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 567–596.
Published: 01 September 2012
... extensive Latin interlinear glosses. Each hymn is then immediately repeated in a jumbled word order that gives a German equivalent following each Latin term. After a while, this dual-­language presentation is dropped in favor of simply rendering the hymns in concise German prose. The vary- ing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 437–460.
Published: 01 September 2017
... rich way of illustrating this creative pro- cess. An appreciation of these compilational forms is an essential part of a more rigorously historicized understanding of “Chaucer’s innovative literary uses of the Bible.”16 The glories of glossing Compared to the other compilations discussed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 289–326.
Published: 01 May 2005
....” Th e “pro- cess of the text following” Tyndale takes as the gloss on “the letter kills.” If you understand “letter” to mean “literally,” you are creating an allegory directly contradicted by the text: “Th us seest thou that the letter signifi eth not the literal sense and the spirit the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 461–486.
Published: 01 September 2017
... remains ambiguous, in part due to scholars’ dis- agreement over what counts as a Wycliffite Bible. For example, in the two Raschko / Taking Apart the Wycliffite Bible  463 most recent lists of manuscripts, Kathleen Kennedy includes copies of the Wycliffite Glossed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 487–516.
Published: 01 September 2017
... paratexts conditioned the perception of readers.15 This scholarship has revealed how much a text’s packaging shaped readers’ constructions of meaning and their subsequent reuse of reading material.16 The unmediated scripture that reformers aspired to eschewed “false glosses,” as Tyndale wrote in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 511–529.
Published: 01 September 2007
... attention to the fact that in Mesoamerica painters included women and men, as evidenced on folio 30r of Telleriano-Remensis, which depicts a female tlacuilo identified by a Spanish gloss as La pintora, supposedly a concubine of Hutizilihuitl, the first ruler of Mexico-Tenochtitlan. The production of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2018) 48 (2): 301–340.
Published: 01 May 2018
... Parkes’s essay that Batman took a utili- tarian approach to the spiritual writing of the past, and that as a minister in the established Church he sourced Middle English devotional writings for material for sermons and pastoral guidance Batman’s annotations and occasional glosses in texts such...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 415–435.
Published: 01 September 2017
... back-­translates, using the English to read the Latin: “An Elder caled in this chapter presbiteris.”23 Another significant marginal comment recalls one of Tyndale’s original “pestylent glosses.” This is the passage in Matthew 16 where Jesus says to Peter, “thou arte Peter. And upon thys...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 119–147.
Published: 01 January 2010
... involves not just the Geneva Bible itself, but also (in at least one instance) its Calvinist glosses, which, like Marlowe, he employs so as to expose “the fallacy in [the annotator’s] handling of the argument.”10 Studies of the biblical allusions in Shakespeare’s plays have listed over...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 273–297.
Published: 01 May 2010
... call for justice and punishment of Wrong, Reason also provides an important detail to consider when thinking about Mede and her geneal- ogy. Not only does she try to get grace and mercy for wrongdoers by giving gifts, but she also uses “glosynge speche.”16 Her glossing speech, the smooth or...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 545–560.
Published: 01 September 2017
... lines later. But more substantive differences and evidence for her preference for the Geneva translation do occur in the poem. Perhaps because she felt less uneasiness about the obvious lack of canonicity of the marginal commentary in Geneva bibles, Lanyer alludes to some of these glosses...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... world, its blackness a figure for sin.30 Paulinus of Nola declared that Ethiopians were burnt by sin rather than sun, while a popular school text glossed “Ethiopians” simply as “sinners,” and stated that “Ethiopians are . . . black men presenting a terrifying appearance to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 421–459.
Published: 01 May 2012
... Tes- tament recalls this practice in a gloss on Christ’s entry into Jerusa- lem (Matt. “These offices of honour [strewing of palms, etc.] done to our Saviour extraordinarily, were very acceptable: and for a memory hereof the holy Church maketh a solemne Procession euery yere vpon this day...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 587–597.
Published: 01 September 2017
... all goddis, and sonnes of the most hye: but yet as men and mortall kyngis, ye shall fall downe and dye” (fol. 4v). The 1560 Geneva Bible’s printed gloss to this passage drives home the specific identification of this audience: “No title of honour shal excuse you, but you shalbe subiect to Gods...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 629–651.
Published: 01 September 2016
... draws on one of what appear to be two words spelled soule in Middle English usage, both of which have an alimentary sense. Edmund Colledge and James Walsh’s 1978 edition of A Revelation was the earliest to query the received sense of soule. Without glossing the full import of the passage, these...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 173–196.
Published: 01 January 2004
...’ bodies before exercise would also be familiar from a text at the heart of the Anglo-Latin canon: Aldhelm refers to gymnasts’ use of unguents in the prose De virginitate.50 A gloss on Isidore specifying the nudity of the baths is at once clear and suggests the alterity of the custom: glossing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 699–724.
Published: 01 September 2012
... spiritual symptomatology, Rolle was perfectly situ- ated to serve as Methley’s model. For Methley, Rolle’s influence is perhaps strongest in his first extant contemplative treatise, the Schola amoris languidi — the most clearly struc- tured and polished as well as the most extensively glossed of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 549–583.
Published: 01 September 2014
... thought or done idolatrouslie, be so farre-­forth abhorred. For of that which is good even in evill things God is author. (22) The discretionary eye, capable of seeing God’s authorship of the good in evil things, glosses providential recoveries of sacred things preserved against...