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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
.... Duke University Press 2010 a Shakespeare’s Theater Games Tom Bishop University of Auckland Auckland, New Zealand Il faut entrer le jeu; il ne...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 441–442.
Published: 01 May 2015
... illustrate some of the microhistorical practices that continue to evolve, especially in medieval and early modern contexts. Essays might focus on reducing the scale of analysis while “playing the ladder game” with differ- ent scales of analysis; working not just with clues, but also with silences and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 245–288.
Published: 01 May 2005
... verbal game. With respect to this genre, R. Howard Bloch explains how the emergence of inquest within the secular judicial sphere, and of dialectical patterns within the vernacular lyric, contributed—in diff erent ways, at diff erent times, under diff erent circumstances...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2015) 45 (3): 635–637.
Published: 01 September 2015
... and early modern contexts. Essays might focus on reducing the scale of analysis while “playing the ladder game” with differ- ent scales of analysis; working not just with clues, but also with silences and gaps in the evidence and with fragmented or incomplete understand- ings of events; blending...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 287–321.
Published: 01 May 2015
... pieces popular at the annual carnival in Picardy, which were de rebus quae geruntur, “about things that are going on.”11 This history suggests an associa- tion between such word games and the Picard region, and indeed, during its pan-­European vogue in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, evidence...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2004
... women, a practice that increased the population and refreshed the gene 74 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 34.1 / 2004 Figure 3. Ivory game board of the daughter of 1Abd al-Rahman III. Courtesy Museo de Burgos. pool, Muslim women in contrast could only marry Muslim men.31 One...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 531–547.
Published: 01 September 2007
... and Development of the Chester Cycle,” Modern Philology 75 (1978): 219  –  46; Clopper, Drama, Play, and Game: English Festive Culture in the Medieval and Early Modern Period (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001); Richard K. Emmerson, “Contextualizing Perfor- mance: The...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2008) 38 (1): 103–118.
Published: 01 January 2008
... forms of dissimulation. The queen mother tells Henry III to practice it himself. In her diplomatic game, she stresses her strategy not to “disclose” her acts and designs.15 In certain situations, it would be better to delay punishing the wicked. Catherine states that in her work to disarm...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 7–52.
Published: 01 January 2017
...: I recall a conversation with Jacques Revel about the micro versus the macro, the challenge of the one to the other, and the contentious debates about which is more important. He remarked that these dichotomies are just rhetorical games, that the real question was one of scales. I like his term...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 217–244.
Published: 01 May 2005
... thoghte, what so mai befalle, Or that sche lawhe, or that sche wepe, Sche wolde hire goode name kepe For feere of wommanysshe schame. Bot what in ernest and in game, Sche stant for love in such a plit, Th at sche hath lost al appetit Of mete, of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2008) 38 (1): 35–55.
Published: 01 January 2008
... to represent the duke. On the other hand, Castiglione’s aim is to avoid being too conspicuous, for being too conspicuous would only invite invidious comparison in a book in which all the courtiers are seen as potentially equal during the course of the evening games, each courtier as worthy as...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2010
... the serious games made possible when a player’s live experience is granted real authority. Heather Hirschfeld’s essay engages the legal, monetary, and peni- tential economies in The Merchant of Venice, and explores their mutual dependence on the term satisfaction to describe both...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 375–406.
Published: 01 May 2009
... same essential story and offer the same essential lesson: that men ought to identify in every way with their cocks. Cocks of the game, according to Wilson, domesticate men, teaching them “to be constant and louing to [their] wiues, as [cocks] are to their Hens” (D1r). The instinctual behavior...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 173–195.
Published: 01 January 2010
... aristocratic bodies of the Theban kinsmen, is identified with “holiday” pastime, anticipating the play’s later staging of May games and morris dancing. Both the prison and, by implication, the physical structure of the Blackfriars playhouse, onto which the architecture of the jail is...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 279–308.
Published: 01 May 2004
.... Valentine’s Day indebted to Chaucer’s Parliament of Fowls and its critique of the aristocratic game of love and marriage. Clanvowe’s interrogation of this matrimonial game firmly establishes the problematic within the realm of cross-sex erotic desire while excluding any mention of same-sex relations that...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 39–66.
Published: 01 January 2005
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 January 2007
... at cards and dice with their hosts, who are (unbeknownst to the Frenchmen) the pirate captain John Ward and his associate Gismund. This gambling scene starts with a series of references to “hazarding” and “ventur- ing.” These terms refer to a game of chance, but also to the risk involved in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 147–166.
Published: 01 January 2017
...: aggrieved peasants, super- cilious aristocrats, day laborers, guildsmen, clergy, and traders. The setting, whether in small hamlets or major cities like Brussels, Antwerp, or Ghent, is often a site of male sociability — taverns, guild houses, gaming houses, public squares, bathhouses, and brothels.3...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
... traded place for space, producing room for imaginative play in the process.24 This Killingworth problem is similar to the problem posed by the perhaps more familiar scene at the cliffs of Dover in King Lear, recently explored in Tom Bishop’s article “Shakespeare’s Theater Games” and in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2006) 36 (1): 75–102.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., forms that escape constraints previously accepted as rules of the literary history game. I wish, for example, to consider one line of “nonliterary” descent, through the origins of the Tudor dynasty in the unusually internecine and horrific struggles of the three decades before Bosworth Field...