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fragments and ruins

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (2): 221–244.
Published: 01 May 2024
...Kristján Hannesson Scholars have related Petrarch's reflections on fragments and ancient ruins to his poetics and to his evolving sense of self. He expresses fears that his texts might become fragmented in the hands of posterity, and he would rather burn them than show them to the public...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (2): 365–385.
Published: 01 May 2018
... the form of paintings, such as Pieter Saenredam’s St. Bavokerk with Fictive Bishop’s Tomb , or of poems recollecting vanished monuments, such as Shakespeare’s sonnets, Drayton’s Poly-Olbion , and Spenser’s Ruines of Time . A clutch of early seventeenth-century poetic memorials to lost tombs and shrines...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 211–246.
Published: 01 May 2000
... University Stanford, California The inspiration for The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, as Edward Gibbon famously recalls in his memoirs, came from ruins: “It was at Rome on the fifteenth of October 1764, as I sat musing amidst the ruins of the Capitol while...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2006) 36 (3): 619–642.
Published: 01 September 2006
..., postutopian, postmodern moment). But once we have landed in the miniaturized world of Milton’s Hell, or Swammerdam and Leeuwenhoek’s fragmented world of ruined combs and magnified ovaries, we have left both the wonderful and the sublime behind and found ourselves in the realm — however...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2014
... that was scarcely imaginable before Bacon’s “active philosophy.” Bacon’s term sounded oxymoronic to contemporary ears, and the oxymoron was tenden- tious, an announcement of the new philosophy’s determination to erect itself on the ruins of the classical opposition of action and contemplation. Somewhat...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 9–55.
Published: 01 January 2007
... of the mapmaker’s atlas. Yet it is more often composed of fragments: separate seas, stretches of coast, zones of liveli- hood, points of departure, and points of arrival. Ships on its waters function as moving pieces of sovereign space, receptacles for goods and their atten- dant expectations, and living...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 531–547.
Published: 01 September 2007
... University Press, 1982); Non-Cycle Plays and Fragments, ed. Norman Davis, EETS s.s. 1 (London: Oxford University Press, 1970); The Macro Plays, ed. Mark Eccles, EETS o.s. 262 (London: Oxford University Press, 1969). 5 Clopper, ed., REED: Chester, 27  –  28, 33. On Arneway, see Lumiansky...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 95–146.
Published: 01 January 2004
... of the archaeologist and the art historian. The archaeologist invokes style in the belief that a surviving fragment of form, motif, or applied tech- nique can be felt and understood as a kind of synecdoche or as what Scha- piro called a “symptomatic trait” from which to project an assumed whole.8 Any art historian...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 January 2004
..., and the Middle East not as secondary regions to be judged from a European standard, nor as ‘sources’ from which to trace influence, but as full participants in a world simultaneously larger 2 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 34.1 / 2004 and more fragmented—a world of intersecting, mutating...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 147–172.
Published: 01 January 2004
... the island was the far northwestern frontier of the imperium; for a Christian writer like Isidore or more especially Gildas, this remoteness became a measure of spir- itual isolation and deprivation. The classic and frequently quoted statement of this sacralized geography appears in Gildas’s Ruin...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (1): 137–171.
Published: 01 January 2011
.... . . . They say that the winds ruin houses and break down trees, and the fire burns them; but the Viracocchie devour everything, they consume the very earth, they force the rivers, they are never quiet, they never rest, they are always rushing about, sometimes in one direction...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... ownership token of submission, or the male privilege to use violence.59 Concomitantly, Hrotsvit projects socially deval- ued practices of her own group—such as homosexual acts inappropriate to marriage liaisons—onto the misconstrued other. The triple strategy of exclusion, social fragmentation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 359–390.
Published: 01 May 2017
... their paintings to the backs of playing cards, Fumerton has argued that these expensive little objects were at the core of “the aris- tocratic self of the age,” built upon a “logic of the trivial that can be devel- oped in terms of the fragment, periphery, and ornament.”35 This subject reinforces itself...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 391–410.
Published: 01 May 2017
.... Wien: Böhlau Verlag, 2016. 207 pp.; 5 maps, 10 figs. Paper eur 30.00. Seaman, Myra, and Eileen A. Joy, eds. Fragments for a History of a Vanish- ing Humanism. Interventions: New Studies in Medieval Culture. Colum- bus: Ohio State University Press, 2016. viii, 281 pp.; 1 fig. $99.95. Zwierlein...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 75–119.
Published: 01 January 2017
...Paul Edward Dutton How small can microhistorians go? The article proposes the advantages of “particle history,” the intense investigation of small, often isolated and dislocated fragments, and how they connect to the worlds to which they once belonged. To demonstrate the method, the article takes...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 85–108.
Published: 01 January 2002
... the province of Raetia, the city of Chur assumed primary strategic significance as the new admin- istrative center.9 Excavations conducted throughout the twentieth century uncovered numerous structures of Roman age within the city, as well as countless Roman coins, bronze statues, and fragments of marble...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 575–599.
Published: 01 September 2000
... to be “riche . . . of hooly thoght and werk” [479], and the Host tells the pilgrims to “werken as I shal yow seye,” that is, “do as I tell you” [779 Particularly striking is the frequent use of werk in The Second Nun’s Tale, the only other tale in Fragment VIII. All ten instances...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 503–529.
Published: 01 September 2014
... of Gloucester College, built above the main floor of what had been the exten- sive wooden structure that provided a hall and lodging for the scholar-­monks of Bury St. Edmunds, was in ruins by the seventeenth century, but when Allen arrived at Gloucester Hall, only thirty years after Gloucester College...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 245–286.
Published: 01 May 2015
... by a number of strays inside the same house. There are several leaves with neumes that, having become detached from the books to which they once belonged, now lead an anonymous life in no-­man’s land. Since Neustift is renowned for its distinctive system of musical notation, such fragments from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 561–584.
Published: 01 September 2001
... did to our ruine. . . . The Virgin Mary had not the same interest in our salvation, as Eve had in our destruction; nothing that she did entred into that treasure, that ransom that redeemed us” (Sermons, 1:200). To describe Mary as “Gods partner here, [who] furnish’d thus / Halfe of that Sacrifice...