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feudalism

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 223–261.
Published: 01 May 2006
...Kathleen Davis Duke University Press 2006 a Sovereign Subjects, Feudal Law, and the Writing of History Kathleen Davis Princeton University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 577–610.
Published: 01 September 2004
... both Christianity and feu- dalism. Why feudalism? There may be a number of answers to this question, but the most obvious one, and the one most relevant to a reinvigorated sense of the “Marxist premodern,” is that Hegel, as if by historical accident, stood in a privileged place from which to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 473–522.
Published: 01 September 2004
... the feudal lord; the steam-mill society with the industrial capitalist” (6:165–66). Pierre Dockès wonders whether Marx intended this aphorism as “a joke.”5 In fact, the claim that the form taken by society’s relations of production is determined by the level of development of its productive...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 463–472.
Published: 01 September 2004
..., a manifold gradation of social rank. In ancient Rome we have patri- cians, knights, plebeians, slaves; in the Middle Ages, feudal lords, vassals, guild-masters, journeymen, apprentices, serfs; in almost all of these classes, again, subordinate gradations...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 309–344.
Published: 01 May 2004
... fundamental respects Rodríguez’s seminal text, charts the transition from feudalism to capitalism between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries. While the narrative is a famil- iar one, standard accounts, with respect to Spain, have proceeded by “ignor- ing the life-and-death struggle between two...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 79–112.
Published: 01 January 2001
... part two, I suggest that the Roland manages this instability through its strategic deployment of gender. Far from being marginal to this feudal Christian epic, Aude and Bramimonde are central to its construction of difference. Unsettled by the indeterminacy of the boundary...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 121–158.
Published: 01 January 2005
... Ages before. It made total sense to me, as if all of my accumulated sporadic facts and information had suddenly come to life and acquired meaning. Catego- ries of Medieval Culturee wasn’t the fi rst of Gurevich’s books I had read. Years earlier I had read Problems in the Origins of Feudalism in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2007) 37 (2): 335–371.
Published: 01 May 2007
... techniques and profits. But the estates debate persisted in Tudor England as a way to address three intermeshed and incomplete transitions, one political, one religious, and one economic. First, Henry Tudor staged a successful baronial coup in 1485, turning a dispersed feudal state into a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 523–548.
Published: 01 September 2004
... Manches- ter commemorated and vilifi ed by Marx against the backdrop of medieval, or “feudal,” structures of production and institution, and by thinking about the particular form of institutional history practiced by Tout, a history both of institutions and the development of an institution of history...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2007) 37 (2): 373–391.
Published: 01 May 2007
... heroes. Theirs was an indiscriminate policy of pred- atory assault; his is a systematic program of what we might call imperial expansionism, conducted under the rules and customs of chivalric warfare and feudal alliances. In fact, Galeholt is renowned for his chivalry. When Arthur, dismayed at...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 575–599.
Published: 01 September 2000
... theologically defended expla- nation of a changing economy. Metaphor would have to be called in to reg- ister the new. In many of the pilgrims’ portraits, a feudal location is given to work. For some of the pilgrims, work is rendered very fully: the Plowman...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 447–451.
Published: 01 September 2007
... Subjects, Feudal Law, and the Writing of History,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 36 (2006): 223 – 61. 3 Judith M. Bennett, “Medieval Women, Modern Women: Across the Great Divide,” in Culture and History, 1350 – 1600: Essays on English Communities, Identities, and Writing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 519–542.
Published: 01 September 2002
... solicited, and were granted, noble rights and privileges on the basis of their craft. It even seems that these glassmakers were resented for their upward class mobility, for Godfrey reports that other members of the lesser nobility refused to integrate them into the feudal establishment through...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 245–288.
Published: 01 May 2005
... assigning to the Santa Hermandad the functions of tax farming and the administration of justice, Isabel eff ec- tively undermined the very foundations of feudal authoritarianism. In the fi rst half of this essay, I survey the main historical episodes that in quick succession delayed the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 479–504.
Published: 01 September 2000
... minority of Alfonso XI. This system was identical to the one instituted in France in the eleventh century, where the agnatic family model was well established and the decline of monarchic authority had enabled the feudal nobility to privatize jurisdiction more rapidly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 453–467.
Published: 01 September 2007
... other period divisions: for example, dynasties (Tudor from Stuart), centuries (thirteenth from fif- teenth), literary figures (Age of Chaucer from Age of Shakespeare), and modes of economic production (feudalism from capitalism). Whether you exist on one side or the other of the b.c./a.d. divide...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 549–576.
Published: 01 September 2004
... susceptible to Marxist readings, situated as they are at the very beginnings of modernity, and deeply implicated in narratives of the shift from feudalism to capitalism. But it is not this susceptibility I wish to consider here. The question to be asked of the medieval period and Marxist aesthetics is...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 461–486.
Published: 01 May 2012
... accumulation — the violent means of dispossession that marks the historical transition between the feudal and capitalist modes of production. While at first glance The Faerie Queene seems to purge the economic impulse from its rendition of the imperial quest by repeatedly punishing various types of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2001) 31 (3): 477–506.
Published: 01 September 2001
... makes it difficult for us to grasp that the opposition we take for granted between secular and ecclesiastic, between sacred and profane, may simply not be operative within medieval society. To illustrate this point, I will examine briefly the so-called feudal metaphor. Frequently, a troubadour...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2002) 32 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2002
... queen (which, accord- ing to feudal law, must be based on sight), he is no longer able to maintain the convenient fiction of the invisibility of the queen’s body, but must expose her to his subjects—at the same time subjecting his ability to direct the sovereign gaze to Aggravayne and Mordred.32...