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female cross-dressing narratives

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2019) 49 (2): 233–264.
Published: 01 May 2019
... textual modes of translation connect with translation’s role in subject formation in medieval texts, focusing on two narratives about female cross-dressing, the Vie de Sainte Euphrosine and the Roman de Silence . Gender emerges in these texts through multiple intersecting modes of translation which are...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 41–62.
Published: 01 January 2000
... dressing as a man and by appropriating a phallus that made her a vic- tim of harsh retribution. In late medieval Speyer, there was a growing anxiety about cross-dressing. The magistrate prohibited women from wearing men’s clothes, and, later, men from wearing women’s clothes...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2018) 48 (2): 261–300.
Published: 01 May 2018
... gender beyond just its bodily basis. Juana recounts her decision to ee her childhood home in male clothing in order to reach the convent of Santa María de Cubas in safety and enter as a novitiate. This sequence evokes various medieval hagiographic accounts of cross- dressing female saints who...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
... transitionally operative in the social and epistemological chaos of the period. Confronted by the New World, European gender categories often fail: the vexed category of the indigenous crossdressing berdache featured in the encounter texts of Spanish conquest is the most prominent thwarting of Euro...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 69–94.
Published: 01 January 2014
... mostly female group of pious Laudian gentry. Their views, defended with considerable argumentative verve, turn out to defy expectation on every front. The Story Books represent a major (and largely unknown) body of early modern women's writing, one that challenges the received pictures of feminists...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 13–65.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., that the ship is moving away from the shore. However, the fact that its sails are furled — the cross masts are visible — suggests that it is preparing to enter the harbor.) This unwritten event is equally the essential condition for the production of the De Bry engraving. Unwritten...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 387–402.
Published: 01 September 2003
... allusions that run through this brief narrative ren- der the unexpected revelation of a woman even more puzzling: What is she doing here? In her exhaustive study of cross-dressing in (mostly recent) Western culture, Marjorie Garber argues that the apparently spontaneous or unexpected or...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 419–435.
Published: 01 September 2003
... the female margin to the male center, it never quite achieves its goal. 45 Mary’s story, spoken in her own (female) voice and called by the monk Zosimas a “life-giving narrative” (VM 14), is paralleled by the christological and thus male phrases, “life- giving wood of the cross” and “life...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2002) 32 (2): 269–304.
Published: 01 May 2002
..., and imitation in virgin martyr legends; and the theatrical con- ventions, like cross-dressing, that created and reflected tensions between the narrative represented in performance and the social space in which it was performed. The ethical demands of hagiographic narrative had significant...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 385–428.
Published: 01 May 2005
... brightnesse. Th en pulled hee off a mantle which she wore, leaving her from the girdle upwards al naked, her soft, daintie white hands hee fastened behind her, with a cord about both wrists, in manner of a crosse, as testimony of her cruellest Martyrdome...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
...- preted as a visual spectacle. For scholars of early modern culture, cross-dressing has equally served as a lodestone, orienting and obfuscating early modern gender difference. These debates have examined early modern cross-dressing as both a historical and theatrical practice, querying how English...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 483–509.
Published: 01 September 2009
... hands before it was completed. Garments in different stages of completion criss-crossed the city as their individual components passed between the shops of artisans and merchants. These working methods meant that consumers themselves were accustomed to managing the overall process from start to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 393–416.
Published: 01 May 2011
... Sowtars Wyfe to “Kilt up your claithis [clothes] abone [above] your waist” (1382  –  84). As the Sowtars Wyfe exposes to her female companion and the audience the genitalia that her husband has not seen for forty days, the crossdressed male playing her part creates a comic yet unsettling trans...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 397–453.
Published: 01 May 2006
... dedication to specific religious ideas for which, in some instances, they would die; to trace their contributions to genealogies of female writing that cross the Reformation divide. Woolf can hardly be blamed for not citing a single English medieval figure in her long genealogy, since the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 403–417.
Published: 01 September 2003
... / $2.00. pared a mud poultice) and also by her mother’s chastened faith: when the mother, following her daughter’s stern instructions, “put her hand inside her bosom (kólpos) to place the seal of the cross on the part,” the sore simply dis- appeared. All that remained in its stead was the “little...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2015) 45 (3): 543–556.
Published: 01 September 2015
... 1584, but he seems to have worked easily in both Protestant and Catholic contexts. “Marten de Vos inventor,” notes the engraving of the Nailing to the Cross, “Joan bussemecher sculp et excudit,” which is to say that the image was designed by de Vos but engraved and published by Bussemecher...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 269–305.
Published: 01 May 2012
... might be no accident that Jephthah’s daughter died and Abraham’s son was spared. 272 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 42.2 / 2012 Why? What gets people so stirred by the mingling of death and female virginity? A psychoanalyst would likely respond to this question with...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 17–40.
Published: 01 January 2004
... Halsall / Gender and the End of Empire 19 society be gendered male and female, and thus renders heterosexuality oblig- atory (at the very least, as she says, in societies where cross-cousin marriage is the norm, it obliges “cross-cousin-sexuality thus the sex/gender system. Although Rubin’s study is...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 621–644.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., 329 pp. $27.95. Lafayette, Madame de. La Princesse de Clèves. Edited by Melanie E. Gregg. Molière and Co. French Classics, vol. 3. Newark, Del.: European Master- pieces, 2006. liv, 197 pp. Paper $12.95. Lowerre, Sandra, ed. The Cross-Dressing Female Saints in Wynkyn de Worde’s 1495 Edition of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 327–348.
Published: 01 May 2005
... way that if one of the participants made the sign of the cross, the assembly was thought to vanish into thin air. Bodin emphasizes the function of confession as a vehicle for information on the sabbat: “the assemblies, and other wickedness . . . cannot be learned except by their confession or...