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enjoyment

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
...Jeffrey Jerome Cohen © by Duke University Press 2001 JMEMS31.1-05 Cohen 2/26/01 7:00 PM Page 113 a On Saracen Enjoyment: Some Fantasies of Race in Late Medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 623–653.
Published: 01 September 2013
... marketing scheme — pitched themselves first as how-to manuals and then as “why-to” guides that turned the enjoyment of hot beverages into a performance of sociability. Those published in France accomplished these tasks by inaugurating a new trend: they grouped coffee, chocolate, and tea together in a single...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2001) 31 (3): 477–506.
Published: 01 September 2001
... to professionalize (self-defensively perhaps) our activities, to admit to plea- sure or enjoyment in our reading of medieval texts, to acknowledge their emotive power or charm, were weaknesses we felt we could ill afford. Medieval texts could be clever and sophisticated (therefore in need of our...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2012) 42 (1): 83–105.
Published: 01 January 2012
... for enjoyment, envy reveals itself as preeminently dangerous.22 Gower’s Genius accordingly refers to envy as the “werste vice of alle” (II.3130), though this honor is also given to pride (I.3057).23 In the political opening of the poem, Gower laments the absence of love in the world...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
... reality, the drama was understood as sig- nificant play.9 Kolve frames his picture of the “play” of drama in terms borrowed from Johan Huizinga’s Homo Ludens, terms that lead back to a picture of aesthetic activity as disinterested playful enjoyment deriving from Kant and Schiller.10 The...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 577–610.
Published: 01 September 2004
... powerful possession, by which he installs himself between the bondsman’s labor and its yield: “For the lord, on the other hand, the immediatee rela- tion becomes through this mediation the sheer negation of the thing, or the enjoyment of it” [Dem Herrn dagegen wirdd durch diese Vermittlung die...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 1–38.
Published: 01 January 2001
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 643–672.
Published: 01 September 2004
... a beholder with you!” (5.5.116–17). It was as though the (ex)changes constituting the Fair themselves produced the form of sensuous appreciation behind the aesthetic enjoyment of secular theater and religious expectation, both. I think we are encountering here an extremely ornate version of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2002
..., 118. 11 Ibid. 12 Ibid., 117. 13 Analyzing a statement by art historian Meyer Shapiro on the role of still life, Craig Owens attributes these motives to art history: “In this passage, representation communicates with power via the medium of possession (use, enjoyment). Thus, we can...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2012) 42 (1): 225–244.
Published: 01 January 2012
... and Enjoyment in Late Medieval Poetry: Love after Aristotle. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, vol. 85. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. vii, 245 pp. $90.00. Tinkle, Theresa. Gender and Power in Medieval Exegesis. The New Middle Ages. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. xvi...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 25–38.
Published: 01 January 2005
... (because romances have happy endings); as often, Simpson chooses a minor or neglected work (here the little romance Sir Amadace ) and uses it brilliantly as a keynote text, a way of showing how his ideas work. There is a tremendous sense of enjoyment and adventure about Simpson’s procedures...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 143–177.
Published: 01 January 2003
... enjoyments the most resembling Heaven, and the best representation of our lost felicitie. It is the common Terme and the pit from whenc we were dug; We all came out of this parsly bed. —John Evelyn, Elysium Britannicum Before the garden can be a paradise—Evelyn’s “Inter Solatia humana purissi- mum”—it...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 173–195.
Published: 01 January 2010
... manifested through the hungry, grasping quality of their vision (we hear of a tanner’s daughter who “must see the Duke” [2.3.47]; characteristically, the enjoyment he might derive from seeing her is not openly discussed). The noble characters, although no less avid for the most part, are none- theless...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2012) 42 (1): 131–155.
Published: 01 January 2012
... own sake? Baius argues that it is not only consistent with failure to serve God, but it actually implies that the agent has turned away from God: [T]he virtues that serve carnal enjoyments, or any advantages whatever, cannot be true virtues at all. But those that are not will...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 39–56.
Published: 01 January 2001
... work by one author gens can be rendered “race,” “nation,” “people,” “tribe,” “stock,” or “family.” Mynors himself recognized that trans- lation is not only an “enjoyable art” but also a “perilous” one.6 Perhaps this issue has been labored. Yet we must consider that...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 147–164.
Published: 01 January 2001
... very beginning, “men covet to hear the Holy Land spoken about and diverse countries thereabout and [they] have of that great pleasure and enjoyment” (44); and the narrative of travel that the narrator goes on to give unmistakably delivers the pleasure...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 493–518.
Published: 01 September 2002
... taverns or ale-houses for enjoyment”; cited in Leonard R. N. Ashley, Elizabethan Popular Culture (Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1988), 8. On the taboos against women independently frequenting such establishments, see Clark, English Alehouse, 131–32...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 143–159.
Published: 01 January 2009
.... The overriding irony of such a text lies in plundering Spanish mate- rials to stage an allegorical victory over Spain. Yet this would be obvious only to bilingual, sophisticated readers or viewers of Rule a Wife, and would not impede the general audience’s enjoyment of the dramatic put-down. One...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 161–181.
Published: 01 January 2009
... sentiment resurfaces more strongly in Behn’s later version. Whereas Killigrew’s Angellica is seeking enjoyment when she encounters Thomaso, Willmore’s attraction to Behn’s Angellica is such that, in spite of her desire to keep her relations with prospective buyers strictly commercial, she still...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 183–200.
Published: 01 January 2009
... apprehension of American food. Campos / English Encounter with Chocolate  189 Gage’s enjoyment of Spanish-American cuisine is compromised by his shifting political and religious allegiances. His English readers, after all, are expecting a confessional exposé. Hence...