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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
...Jeffrey Jerome Cohen © by Duke University Press 2001 JMEMS31.1-05 Cohen 2/26/01 7:00 PM Page 113 a On Saracen Enjoyment: Some Fantasies of Race in Late Medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 623–653.
Published: 01 September 2013
... marketing scheme — pitched themselves first as how-to manuals and then as “why-to” guides that turned the enjoyment of hot beverages into a performance of sociability. Those published in France accomplished these tasks by inaugurating a new trend: they grouped coffee, chocolate, and tea together in a single...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 477–506.
Published: 01 September 2001
... to plea- sure or enjoyment in our reading of medieval texts, to acknowledge their emotive power or charm, were weaknesses we felt we could ill afford. Medieval texts could be clever and sophisticated (therefore in need of our exegesis), or clumsily repressive (and therefore in need of our exegesis...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 83–105.
Published: 01 January 2012
... to the common good are those moments in which avarice is exceeded by envy. Where envy moves beyond a desire to possess an object enjoyed by another to the desire to destroy the neighbor’s very capacity for enjoyment, envy reveals itself as preeminently dangerous.22 Gower’s Genius accordingly refers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
... play.9 Kolve frames his picture of the “play” of drama in terms borrowed from Johan Huizinga’s Homo Ludens, terms that lead back to a picture of aesthetic activity as disinterested playful enjoyment deriving from Kant and Schiller.10 The seriousness of this implicit lineage no doubt derives...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 173–195.
Published: 01 January 2010
...]; characteristically, the enjoyment he might derive from seeing her is not openly discussed). The noble characters, although no less avid for the most part, are none- theless privileged in being able to experience far more complex combina- tions of visual activity and passivity. As Palamon says to Arcite...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 1–38.
Published: 01 January 2001
... for private than for public enjoyment, and their husbands take them into a bedroom to enjoy them rather than parade them before the world. (139– 40) Abelard here fetishizes blackness as a decisive ingredient of desire, he fantasizes about its...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 131–155.
Published: 01 January 2012
... is wrong with pursuing the virtues or virtuous actions for their own sake? Baius argues that it is not only consistent with failure to serve God, but it actually implies that the agent has turned away from God: [T]he virtues that serve carnal enjoyments, or any advantages whatever...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 431–453.
Published: 01 May 2020
... of the grasping miser calibrates any potential enjoyment of wealth away from self- interested accumulation, thus defining the right way to receive riches as the effect of virtue, hard work, and selflessness. Parker s Saylors for my money also conditions the enjoyment of wealth by attaching it to the virtues...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 143–177.
Published: 01 January 2003
... is the first experimental product/ production of science.9 Garden theory and the problem of representation [T]o define a Garden now, is to pronounce it Inter Solatia humana purissi- mum. A place of all terrestriall enjoyments the most resembling Heaven, and the best representation of our lost felicitie...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2002
... the medium of possession (use, enjoyment). Thus, we can identify the motives of art history, at least insofar as it is practiced as a humanistic discipline: a desire for property, which conveys man’s sense of his ‘power over things’; a desire for propriety, a standard of decorum based upon...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (1): 143–159.
Published: 01 January 2009
... to stage an allegorical victory over Spain. Yet this would be obvious only to bilingual, sophisticated readers or viewers of Rule a Wife, and would not impede the general audience’s enjoyment of the dramatic put-down. One might even argue that Fletcher’s appropriation exemplifies a poetics of piracy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (1): 183–200.
Published: 01 January 2009
... Encounter with Chocolate  189 Gage’s enjoyment of Spanish-American cuisine is compromised by his shifting political and religious allegiances. His English readers, after all, are expecting a confessional exposé. Hence, in a move that recalls St. Augus- tine’s rejection of worldly pleasure, Gage...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 225–244.
Published: 01 January 2012
... and Enjoyment in Late Medieval Poetry: Love after Aristotle. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, vol. 85. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. vii, 245 pp. $90.00. Tinkle, Theresa. Gender and Power in Medieval Exegesis. The New Middle Ages. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. xvi, 196 pp...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 39–56.
Published: 01 January 2001
... that trans- lation is not only an “enjoyable art” but also a “perilous” one.6 Perhaps this issue has been labored. Yet we must consider that it is very unlikely that William of Malmesbury’s Gesta regum will be translated into English in its entirety again within...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 147–164.
Published: 01 January 2001
... thereabout and [they] have of that great pleasure and enjoyment” (44); and the narrative of travel that the narrator goes on to give unmistakably delivers the pleasure- inducing descriptions that its audience allegedly wants. One can certainly discern, moreover...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 139–159.
Published: 01 January 2020
... and Ariosto to Clarendon and Locke, found no difficulty in uniting her historical interest in the early modern period with literary criticism and simple enjoyment. Elizabeth Robinson (later Montagu), future leader of the Bluestock- ings, described a similar scene of communal reading in 1742, slipping like...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 453–473.
Published: 01 September 2021
... and the markers between them. Local historical and geographical knowledge was passed down in a cross-generational system in which, typically, older men taught boys landmarks, important geographical features, and property limits. 36 Elders often sealed these lessons with enjoyable inducements, such as gifts...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 113–133.
Published: 01 January 2014
... a contemplative exercise conducted for pure enjoyment, it had become a matter of hard labor, conducted “by the sweat of your brow” (Gen. 3:19), and directed to the production of those necessities that Eden had once naturally yielded. Bacon’s prescriptions for a reformed natural philosophy recognize...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 323–342.
Published: 01 May 2015
... in the resurrection, ‘in their Minnis / The Restoration of All Things  341 destined order or sphere of creation, in the enjoyment of their eternal felicity.’ ” Doc- trine and Covenants, section 77, question-­and-­answer 3, in Bruce R. McConkie, Mor...