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dramatic action

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 497–507.
Published: 01 September 2021
... © 2021 by Duke University Press 2021 early modern drama play scripts theatrical embodiment acting and performance dramatic action What does it mean to think about embodiment without bodies? As a mode of narrative representation-in-dialogue, Western scripted drama (like fiction, epic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
...   © 2013 by Duke University Press 1 spaces of the play to the work’s narrative and dramatic interests in a single but not seamless network of action, activity, and concern. I say single but not seamless because hospitality reorganizes, often provisionally and with a sense of insufficiency...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
... drama? In particular, we may attend to the deliberate provision or creation of opportunity within a dramatic design for actors and audience to recognize their collaboration in the “put on” character of the action. This includes, necessarily, the freedom they enjoy both to observe and to alter...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 335–367.
Published: 01 May 2013
... and the dramatic action that exposes it enables us to probe the play’s participation in sacramental debates and its interrogation of binary categories like “medieval/early modern,” “religious/ secular,” and “Catholic/Protestant.” In what follows, I show how Doctor Faustus reorients these conceptual markers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 393–416.
Published: 01 May 2011
... detailed reforms for the kingdom. Three of the worst perpetrators of disorder and crime, Thift, Dissait, and Falset, have been publicly hanged. The momentum toward reform is slowed dramatically, however, when a character named Foly enters and unleashes two stories about unruly females. First, he...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
..., representational space is “mediated yet directly experienced, which infuses the work and the moment, [and] is established as such through the dramatic action itself.”15 In so much as the performance space becomes a French battlefield or a prison or a tavern, rep- resentational space is being invoked...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... repeated acts of measuring, propels its dramatic action with objective replacements, spiritual stand-­ins, and comedic prostheses.29 The ability to manipulate the tangible elements at 108  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 43.1 / 2013 its disposal, furthermore, corresponds...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
... or dramatic performance; as stage properties, scents have rarely impacted the critical work on late medieval or early modern material histories of the stage, no doubt due to the assumption that olfaction lacks both a history and an archive.5 And, when it is addressed, olfaction emerges as an ahistorical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 387–395.
Published: 01 September 2021
..., in other words, do we engage textual remnants to locate traces of embodied action? A forum midway through the issue offers speculative and provocative answers to this question, and an afterword takes a wider view of the enterprise to think through its implications for periodization and historical analysis...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 315–337.
Published: 01 May 2016
... However, from a dramatic per- spective, this particular host desecration narrative substitutes for a Passion drama, reenacting each episode typical of cycle plays through the actions of Jonathas as he tests the wafer. Passion drama itself is a reenactment that “stands in for” the actual Passion...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 487–495.
Published: 01 September 2021
... and coupling become community through kinesthetic action. Moreover, May games highlight how performance precedes the production of dramatic character. Embodied action defines both the roles and their function within (or perhaps I should say as ) narrative. Similar dynamics apply to The Raven's Almanac...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 253–283.
Published: 01 May 2008
... be seen in a renewed inter- est in orthodox artistic productions of the sacraments in East Anglia during this period, including dramatic works such as the Croxton Play of the Sacra- ment and the morality plays themselves.11 Significantly, in Wisdom the peda- gogical value of penance is not restricted...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 509–531.
Published: 01 September 2021
... actions, objects, and ideas on stage.” 28 Early modern authors often described witnessing mountebanks in clearly dramatic terms. Seth Ward recalls seeing, when Pontaeus was in London, “ spectatours . . . much affected at the imitations of the Zany . . . [and the] admirable performances of the cheife...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 453–473.
Published: 01 September 2021
... energy ultimately controlled and suppressed by the bourgeoisie. Scholars of festive culture have noted ways in which many inversionary rites defy that suppression through creative theatrical expression: see C. L. Barber, Shakespeare's Festive Comedy: A Study of Dramatic Form and Its Relation to Social...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 553–575.
Published: 01 September 2021
... it does little to explain what is unique to ritual and because it tends to “fall back on ritual activity as depicting, modeling, enacting, or dramatizing what are seen as prior conceptual ideas and values.” 31 This, Bell argues, reinforces an opposition between thought and action, which is nothing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Lloyd Edward Kermode This essay introduces and assesses the importance of philosophical, geographical, and anthropological understandings of “space” and “place” for literary and dramatic scholars. In the process, it asks its own questions about the political use and control of space, and how we...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 577–585.
Published: 01 September 2021
..., and witch hunts that engulfed Europe and its colonies during the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. How performances, dramatic or otherwise, were impacted by this upheaval—and responded to it—would have both immediate and lasting consequences. For example, the term “liturgy” only came into common use...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 121–146.
Published: 01 January 2017
... within the body. Dramatic representations of the womb allow us to see what other sources regarding reproduction obscure. Cohen urges us to look beyond sources such as medi- cal manuals because of the gaps between “prescription and real routines.”10 When swifter, broader histories or prescriptive...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 89–117.
Published: 01 January 2010
... Middle Ages. These assumptions are themselves driven by juridico-theological calcula- tions according to which Christ’s actions embody a specific definition of enough: they are simultaneously entirely in excess of, yet precisely sufficient to, redeem all human debt. This is the Pearl poet’s notion...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
... of excellence, an ethics of embodied endurance strong enough to withstand repeated acts of injustice. Like medieval poets, Shakespeare returns to the scene of Cressida’s destruction in order to dramatize the cultural conditions that script her moral evacuation. Taking a long view of Cressida’s downfall reveals...