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dissection

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 79–104.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Jennifer F. Kosmin Although Vesalius, like his contemporaries, had only extremely limited opportunities to examine or dissect the human gravid uterus, it is the image of the anatomist laying bare the (un)pregnant female body and revealing its secrets that graces the title page of the 1543 edition...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 105–124.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Pablo Maurette In the preface to De humani corporis fabrica (1543), Andreas Vesalius explains to Charles V why it is indispensable for anatomists to be trained in the practice of dissection. This strong vindication of manual labor, hitherto considered menial and dishonorable for physicians, is one...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Valeria Finucci In 1543 Andreas Vesalius published his landmark work of anatomy, On the Fabric of the Human Body , which delved inside the human body to see what made it work. Vesalius’s illustrations of body parts were based on what could be seen with the eyes through the practice of dissection...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 61–78.
Published: 01 January 2018
... recorded their professors’ often quite critical assessment of Vesalius and his achievements. Copyright © 2018 Duke University Press 2018 Andreas Vesalius and his successors early modern anatomical education animal and human dissection student notebooks medical discoveries...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 41–59.
Published: 01 January 2018
... assistant in Paris at both the private and the public anatomy lectures of his master, Johann Guinter, as well as dissecting in public at Louvain.5 His first publication, a paraphrase of the medical handbook of the medieval Arabic doctor al-­Razi, introduced the somewhat old-­fashioned professors of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
... bodies. With the rapid proliferation of medical texts and the abundance of illustrations of dissections, increasing numbers of early modern people could gain access to and even generate knowledge about the compounded body. Literary allegories of the body and anatomies of various subjects are both...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 451–453.
Published: 01 May 2016
... with the eyes through the practice of dissection. There- after the most authoritative philosophical and medical pronouncements of the day (by the Hippocratics, Galen, and Ibn Sina) were put to rest unless 452  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 46.2 / 2016 the eye of the inquirer...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 669–671.
Published: 01 September 2016
... what could be seen with the eyes through the practice of dissection. There- after the most authoritative philosophical and medical pronouncements of the day (by the Hippocratics, Galen, and Ibn Sina) were put to rest unless the eye of the inquirer could confirm them. Vesalius’s masterpiece repre...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 125–151.
Published: 01 January 2018
... writers, including Galen, but Fioravanti’s construction coupled that image with human vivisection or, as it was called back then, the anat- omy or dissection of living humans.2 A more anxious conception, human as well as animal vivisection was associated with the ancient writers Herophilus (335...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (1): 93–115.
Published: 01 January 2011
... engrav- ing depicting human sacrifice and those depicting anatomical dissection 108 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 41.1 / 2011 such as the title page of Vesalius’s De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543). We see a similar approach toward control of the body, the corpses similarly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 383–385.
Published: 01 September 2003
... the church, she took theory to historical theology. In The Origenist Controversy: The Cultural Construction of an Early Christian Debate (Princeton Univer- sity Press, 1992), Clark dissects theological issues to reveal their non- theological implications. Current social network theory is...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2015
... final destination for proper burial.7 It was also used, of course, to prepare corpses for the dissecting table. Royalty often had their body parts separated by embalmers pre- paring the corpse for lying in state; while the cadaver would be interred in the royal crypt, the heart was usually...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 447–451.
Published: 01 September 2007
... change. Yet for those working in the early periods, the terms medi- eval and Renaissance or early modern have become increasingly vexed. In our opening essay, Margreta de Grazia brilliantly dissects the history of thought that produced the medieval/modern divide, revealing how “it works less as a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 589–610.
Published: 01 September 2008
... title page. Johann Dryander, a friend of Vesalius, made woodcut illustrations from his own dissections. Anatomia, hoc est, corporis humani dis- sectionis (Marburg, 1537) was a significant book on the anatomy of the head. Charles Estienne’s work, De dissectione partium corporis humani, presents...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
... beneath his scalpel, either in the dissect- Sawday / Cartography, Anatomy, and the Renaissance Eponym  23 ing room, or in the crowded Italian or French and (later) Dutch, German, and English anatomy theaters? There were, of course, traditional names for large structures and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 635–657.
Published: 01 September 2011
...: Gender, Generation, and the Origins of Human Dissection. New York: Zone Books, (2006) 2010. 419 pp.; 60 illus. Paper $22.95. Peterson, Kaara L. Popular Medicine, Hysterical Disease, and Social Con- troversy in Shakespeare’s England. Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity. Farnham...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 191–212.
Published: 01 January 2013
... Traditions of Dissection in Renaissance Venice. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011. xix, 257 pp.; 13 figs. $55.00. Marchitello, Howard. The Machine in the Text: Science and Literature in the Age of Shakespeare and Galileo. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. xi, 236 pp.; 7 figs...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 473–485.
Published: 01 September 2013
... investigation, such as dissection.33 The category of “art” constitutes another domain of knowledge that splintered from artisan work during the premodern period. Legassie’s essay explores how art became divided from craft through a gradual deemphasis on its material basis and elevation of its...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2014
... object beyond, or above, the reach of analysis, or — the histo- riographical equivalent — as humanity’s default state before the Enlighten- ment. Perhaps, as Ethan Shagan suggests, “ ‘taking belief seriously’ precisely means that faith must be questioned, dissected, and analyzed, not because we...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 January 2015
... heretic and the saint. In medieval thought, the saint and the heretic remained closely connected with each other right into the afterlife. Examining the practice of dissection in Renaissance Italy, Katha- rine Park has argued for “the continuing association of the criminal and the saintly body...