1-20 of 97 Search Results for

disease

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 443–465.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Andrew Wear In the early modern era, physical place, health, and disease were integrally linked in a geographical and climatological theory of the environment. The Hippocratic treatise Airs, Waters, Places served as a template for viewing the relationships between places, health, disease, and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 467–491.
Published: 01 September 2008
... belonging to patients who were active in considering, interpreting, and treating disease in an effort to have control over their own bodies. Their voices should be taken into account when writing a cultural history of early modern medicine. © 2008 by Duke University Press 2008...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 403–412.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Susan Zimmerman The phenomenon of disease played an important role in the development of premodern European culture, and in the reciprocal exchanges between Europe and the New World. Its understanding and regulation involved all sectors of society–religion, politics, science, law, commerce–and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 5–40.
Published: 01 January 2000
...Monica H. Green © by Duke University Press 2000 JMEMS30.1-02-Green.5-40 12/21/99 4:29 PM Page 5 a From “Diseases of Women” to “Secrets of Women”: The...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 589–610.
Published: 01 September 2008
... exploration of specific resources that can be used to study the diseased body in medieval and early modern Europe. Bibliographic notations direct the nonspecialist to further readings on the subject. © 2008 by Duke University Press 2008 a The...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2019) 49 (2): 347–376.
Published: 01 May 2019
... arrowhead embedded in Henry’s cheek. It is likely that Henry’s face would have been marked by a scar. Henry V’s battlefield scar would have been read in light of Henry IV’s own scarred face, which was affected by a disease his contemporaries thought to be leprosy. Henry IV’s disfiguration was seen as God’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... impure women and Jewish men, and believed to be a carrier of the disease. The perceived threat of leprous blood to Christian bodily integrity was played out in atropaic social rituals and in widespread defamations against lepers, women, and Jews as devourers or cannibals. This study claims that such...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 89–115.
Published: 01 January 2016
... contemporary critics a new perspective on what it is to give a disease a meaning. © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016 medieval Belle Dame sans Mercy debate illness narratives medical metaphor Achille Caulier Cruelle Femme en Amour and Hôpital d'Amour...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 219–220.
Published: 01 January 2007
... Western culture. Submissions to the open-topic issue are not reviewed any earlier than September in advance of the deadline. Deadline for submission of manuscripts: March 1, 2007 The Diseased Body in Premodern Europe: Ideology and Representation Volume 38 / Number 3 / Fall 2008 Edited by Susan...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2007) 37 (2): 445–446.
Published: 01 May 2007
... httpmedren.aas.duke.edu/jmems The Diseased Body in Premodern Europe: Ideology and Representation Volume 38 / Number 3 / Fall 2008 Edited by Susan Zimmerman This special issue will feature essays that raise theoretical and methodologi- cal questions about the significance of premodern disease in the construc...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 667–669.
Published: 01 September 2006
... any earlier than September in advance of the deadline. Deadline for submission of manuscripts: March 1, 2007 The Diseased Body in Premodern Europe: Ideology and Representation Volume 38 / Number 3 / Fall 2008 Edited by Susan Zimmerman This special issue will feature essays that raise...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 117–139.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 46:1, January 2016 DOI 10.1215/10829636-3343147  © 2016 by Duke University Press a medical term (a “turning point” in an illness), and as such it participated naturally in a lexicon of pathology — of searching out disease, of prevention and cure...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 413–442.
Published: 01 September 2008
... of the great sources of diseases,” proclaimed John Wesley in 1747.6 “Insensible perspiration . . . is the great- est of all the discharges from the human body,” William Buchan stressed in his best-selling Domestic Medicine (1769). “It is of so great importance to health, that few diseases...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 543–570.
Published: 01 September 2002
... obscures his Englishness but also welcomes the unsavory qualities stereotypically associated with the French: vanity and moral laxity. Indeed, Jonson suggests that the Monsieur’s father may have had “the French disease” when his son was conceived, thereby passing it on to him both in its manifestation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 247–273.
Published: 01 May 2013
... diaries that record episodes of illness. By examining sufferers’ words rather than learned medical litera- ture, this article reveals the significance of the emotions to early modern understandings of disease causation. Patients looked to a range of factors to explain the causes of ill...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2018) 48 (1): 61–78.
Published: 01 January 2018
... point the food was found to have already entered the duodenum (JB 172r – v). Understanding and curing diseases The prominent place of physiology in anatomical teaching already goes some way in explaining why medical students and young physicians valued anatomical instruction and knowledge...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 167–188.
Published: 01 January 2016
..., is to bring readers into his own sick body. Donne was among those diagnosed with the disease, and his illness provides this Protestant devotional manual with both its form and occa- sion: to exemplify how physical illness reveals God’s grace, Donne presents twenty-­three chapters, or...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 33–59.
Published: 01 January 2016
... return to the sea in order to mature and take on their salty flavor, he explains, so too sins spawn in the “wicked/diseased” [malveis] senses, hands, and feet, “but the young do not become nor are they called or considered mortal sins until they have reached the heart and there take on their wicked...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2018) 48 (1): 125–151.
Published: 01 January 2018
...- ity of knowing precisely through the dissection of a corpse how the interior parts of the body, when it is alive, work. He was intent on challenging both the physician’s ability to treat diseases and the learned surgeon’s ability to treat conditions, including wounds, fractures, and dislocations...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 345–372.
Published: 01 May 2004
..., his tragic experience of possession. The critical passage is the one where the Doctor diagnoses Ferdinand’s affliction as “A very pestilent disease . . . / They call Licanthropia” (5.2.5–6). His descrip- tion of the disease amounts to a case study of “possession”: In those that are possess’d...