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diplomatic custom and ritual

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 587–608.
Published: 01 September 2020
... documents in the multifaceted context of early modern Anglo-Russian diplomatic ritual. Although Fletcher’s mission has always attracted the attention of scholars in different disciplines, it has not really been considered in light of diplomatic history. Meanwhile, both the English and Russian records of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 565–586.
Published: 01 September 2020
... diplomatic custom and ritual secretarial correspondence in manuscript and print performative nature of diplomacy Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 50:3, September 2020 DOI 10.1215/10829636-8626457 © 2020 by Duke University Press Andrew Marvell in Russia: Secretaries, Rhetoric, and Public...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 477–492.
Published: 01 September 2020
... Ideologies of Diplomacy: Rhetoric, Ritual, and Representation in Early Modern England Jane Yeang Chui Wong Nanyang Technological University Singapore In 2008 John Watkins edited a special issue for the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Toward a New Diplomatic History of Medi- eval and Early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (1): 137–171.
Published: 01 January 2011
... their customs and, in Vecellio's case, from an aesthetic focus on their clothing. In contrast, the De Brys' version of New Spain as presented in parts 3–5 of their America series launched a vivid, sensationalist assault on their readers' curiosity, playing to their fascination with the horrors of New...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (3): 459–481.
Published: 01 September 2009
... how merchants, diplomats, humanists, artists, mendicants, pilgrims, itinerant artisans, and laborers viewed their world and moved within it. Duke University Press 2009 This content is made freely available by the publisher. It may not be redistributed or altered. All rights reserved...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 249–272.
Published: 01 May 2010
... these intentions to friend and foe alike was to undertake one powerfully symbolic act of calculated diplomatic anger: hewing the ancient elm of Gisors. It is important to see this destructive moment as a form of anti­ ritual, deliberately denying, opposing, and negating the traditional...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (1): 119–145.
Published: 01 January 2008
... —  Viatka, Tver', Novgorod, Pskov — becoming master of northeastern Rus'. Moreover, the so-called Tatar Yoke had withered way with the reduction of tribute payments (dan' and vykhod) to the Golden Horde in the 1470s and with the gradual entry of Muscovy into the diplomatic and political world of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 97–139.
Published: 01 January 2007
... Coecke, Nicolay’s project is a classificatory one. The figures have been iso- lated from the ritual context which has migrated, as it were, into the accom- panying text; customs were associated with the body, and these performative aspects of identity, such as military skills, eating, marriage, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (1): 79–101.
Published: 01 January 2008
... eastern Mediterranean between the sixth and the fifteenth centuries. The diplomatic gift in practice As we shall see, gifts (and their proper requital) were, and often still are, part of the fabric of Islamic societies and therefore, unsurprisingly, constituents of their foreign policy.13...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 515–544.
Published: 01 September 2011
... nobility takes, therefore, virtue as its foundation. And one can be considered noble as long as he follows the customs of his ances- Legassie / Chivalric Travel in the Mediterranean  517 tors, who, not departing from virtuous acts and always contrib...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 251–282.
Published: 01 May 2001
... interpretive stability. This essay will focus on the event and texts of the coronation entry of Elizabeth I. The coronation entry was a traditional, ritual procession of the monarch and court through the streets of London, beginning at the Tower of London and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 623–653.
Published: 01 September 2013
..., and Asia — where they served ritualized or traditional purposes.5 The brews of foreign beans and leaves carried in them the con- ceptual danger and wonder associated with the belief-­systems of these far-­ away lands. They frequently caused moral, scientific, and physical confusion in the form...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... Saxonian Capitulary made it a capital offense to refuse bap- tism, to cremate the dead, to participate in pagan rituals, and to eat meat during Lent.9 Of course, other non-Christian religious systems, whether Christianity’s Abrahamitic siblings, Judaism and Islam, or the tribal reli- gions encountered...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
...” for diplomats as they were “navigational tools” for mariners.37 Thus, the inscription of a name on a map or within an atlas in the possessive form (Mar de Cortés) was a powerful symbolic or tokenistic expression of seigneurship over lands now claimed by European sovereigns. The primary...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
... complete of all the dreams he recounts, especially interesting in its pub- lic and diplomatic function, which he sees, of course, as the theatricalized manipulation of a thief. The kind of dream that most seems to interest him in general is the dream of gifts: though no Barbarian ever does “dream that...