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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 489–508.
Published: 01 September 2005
...James Simpson © by Duke University Press 2005 Subjects of Triumph and Literary History: Dido and Petrarch in Petrarch’s Africa and Trionfi...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 493–516.
Published: 01 September 2006
.... Moreover, the rivalry between Rome and Carthage was as much the reality of the third century b.c. as it was the legacy of Virgil’s account of Dido and Aeneas, in which Dido curses the absconded Aeneas with perpetual enmity between Romans and her own people, the Carthaginians. The role that Carthage...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 457–466.
Published: 01 September 2005
... predecessors. In “Subjects of Triumph and Literary History: Dido and Petrarch in Petrarch’s Africa and Trionfi ,” Simpson examines two of Petrarch’s Trionfi , that of Cupid and of Chastity, to show that literary history is created as a result of repeated sub- missions to an imperial project. By reshaping...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 629–662.
Published: 01 September 2005
.... I foretell a diff erent art to be under his members, and this image signifi es something else. Just as he once was turned into Ascanius the off spring of Aeneas in order to bring deception to sacred Dido, thus chaste nymphs believe me he transformed himself into this...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 349–384.
Published: 01 May 2005
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 517–536.
Published: 01 September 2003
...- ated” [cum male sana manus premeret vulgare profanis], was constructed out of an especially striking conation of Virgil and Ovid. “Male sana” was Virgil’s reproach of Dido ( Aen. 4.8), while in the second book of the Ars Trout / The Invention of Early Christian...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2015) 45 (3): 557–571.
Published: 01 September 2015
... happen’d to come up was that part of Dido’s imprecation against Aeneas.24 This account is explicitly located in the library, and the context for the sortes is the king’s being shown books (feasibly the more valuable or prized books of the collection). The edition of Virgil produced is...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 159–184.
Published: 01 January 2005
....;  illus.,  maps. Ferguson, Margaret W. Dido’s Daughters: Literacy, Gender, and Empire in Early Modern England and France. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, xiv, pp.;  illus. paper Gersh, Stephen, and Bert Roest, eds. Medieval and Renaissance Humanism: Rhetoric, Representation, and Reform...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 479–492.
Published: 01 September 2006
...: Conquest, Utopia, and the Wife of Bath’s Tale,” Texas Studies in Language and Litera- ture 44 (2002): 34 – 46; Louise O. Fradenburg, “The Wife of Bath’s Passing Fancy,” Studies in the Age of Chaucer 8 (1986): 31 – 58; Margaret Ferguson, Dido’s Daughters: Literacy, Gender, and Empire in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 17–43.
Published: 01 January 2014
... their watching, not from their being watched; and this shame “arms” them for battle (10.397 – 98). And so too Dido. The shame that Anna’s encourage- ment “destroys” in her is, again, not something imagined as having herself in view, but by herself viewing what she has committed herself to, her hus...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 619–642.
Published: 01 September 2006
... of bee similes and metaphors (though an odd light is here thrown on the one example of actual busy-bee city-building in the bee-rich Aeneid, that of Queen Dido’s Carthage). The present article however was born as a more general paper on bee-writing for the seminar “Curiosity and Wonder...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2008) 38 (1): 57–78.
Published: 01 January 2008
... signs of the old flame,” the words of Dido at the moment she acknowledges her love for Aeneas (IV, 23). Thus the “epic” prince Orestes defines himself not by alluding to the hero who must renounce love in order to found an empire, but by quoting the queen who will die for that hero’s love. The...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
... evidently still developing when Edward II was being written, performed, and published. Marlowe’s use of the word frolic often reflects these older definitions — for example, Iarbus’s sacrifice in Marlowe’s Dido, Queen of Carthage prays, “Eternal Jove, great master of the clouds, / Father of gladness...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 583–606.
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 561–584.
Published: 01 September 2006
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 211–246.
Published: 01 May 2000
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 17–40.
Published: 01 January 2004
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 407–432.
Published: 01 May 2009
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 53–77.
Published: 01 January 2015
... contemporaries often called suicide “the English malady.” Although we lack comparable figures for southern Europe, everyday objects like painted wedding chests (cassoni) and bedroom furnishings visually diffused stories featuring the classical her- oines Dido and Lucrezia, whose iconographies nevertheless...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 61–87.
Published: 01 January 2016