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dialectic

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 577–610.
Published: 01 September 2004
...Andrew Cole © by Duke University Press 2004 What Hegel’s Master/Slave Dialectic Really Means Andrew Cole University of Georgia...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 121–146.
Published: 01 January 2017
... another, but instead makes visible a dialectical relationship between the two. Examining literary representations of individual and social experiences of premodern pregnancy, the essay offers a complementary approach to historical archival methods. © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 microhistory...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2018) 48 (3): 435–459.
Published: 01 September 2018
... scholasticism. Langland avoids these techniques and eschews scholastic forms of resolution; his predilection for debate and deep-structural dialectics insists on the need to keep central theological and spiritual counterpoints in play, all the while opening up conceptual and imaginative “gaps” that bring with...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 13–65.
Published: 01 January 2011
... how the De Bry compilations both disclose and enclose the pluralities of the worlds their travelers encountered, negotiating through word and image the dialectics of difference and similarity. The complex intertwining of religious, ethnographic, and scientific impulses in this monumental publishing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 549–576.
Published: 01 September 2004
... medieval, then, the aesthetic has to be grasped on several diff erent temporal levels—as part of the “dialectic of enlightenment,” the emergence of capital, the invention of subjectivity, the supersession of the cultic, to name a few of the temporalities deployed by Adorno—an insight critical to the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 463–472.
Published: 01 September 2004
... fantasy of an anticapitalist medieval mendicancy, though, must be understood as part of a largely occluded Hegelianism in which a dialectical habit of analy- sis constantly proposes vast cosmic oppositions (in this case capitalism and mendicancy, the “will to power” and “communism”) only to subsume...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 251–278.
Published: 01 May 2004
... aggressivity, it was fundamental to transforming received ideas into understanding (nothing can be “fully understood or properly preached,” he said, unless it “has been broken on the teeth of disputation49 But the name the Middle Ages gave “the science of disputing well” was dialectic.50 As the birds...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2010
... premodernities; here we touch on three, which we call the chronologi- cal, the ethical, and the dialectical. The premodern is most obviously a chronological category: it is whatever comes before the modern. But where, or what, or, more especially, when is the modern? As soon as we ask the question...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 643–672.
Published: 01 September 2004
... theory unusually suited to the task by virtue of having itself originated in the very dialectic of secu- larization it seeks to explain.22 “Artworks can be all the more truly experi- enced,” Adorno writes, “the more their historical substance is that of the one who experiences it” (ATT, 183/271...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 223–261.
Published: 01 May 2006
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 213–250.
Published: 01 May 2001
... native language, the “unlearned tongue” of Middle Low German, the dialect spoken in northern Germany (from the lower Rhein to Prussia).8 In the first part of this essay, I will argue that Mechthild’s use of the Low German vernacular represents an attempt to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 January 2004
... about models of expansion and domi- nation in the post-Roman world. Familiar too are the aggressively imperial dynasties of Byzantium and the Ottonians.2 Yet classical culture, and medieval culture following it, conceived of the world as tripartite, and trans- forming the dialectal interplay between...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2014
... skills we master and teach — reading, writing, speaking, and, of course, critical thinking (unlike our Renaissance predecessors who under- 4  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 44.1 / 2014 stood their work as an ongoing dialectic between episteme and techne). Yet she also warns...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 249–268.
Published: 01 May 2012
... end of the spectrum, other theologies deny the possibility of free will, and assert that reconciliation is wholly a matter of God’s gracious gift (e.g., Lutheranism). Between these two extremes, other theologies develop a dialectic of works and grace. These middle-­ground theologies recognize...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 489–508.
Published: 01 September 2005
... dialectical movement: one apparently invincible fi gure is yet defeated by the next: Love by Chastity; Chastity by Death; Death by Fame and so on In fact, however, this dialectic is, in the relation of the fi rst two triumphs, neutralized by the rewriting of Dido in the Triumph of Cupid Once Cupid is...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 561–584.
Published: 01 September 2006
... others. Desire, in other words, cannot be wholly or only narcissistic because it is necessarily intersubjective and mediated. Lacan consequently argues that desire is produced through the dialectical interchange of similitude and difference, possession and  lack.30 This Lacanian emphasis...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 545–554.
Published: 01 September 2016
... disrupt that identification, and so produced the early fourteenth-­century “nominalism” of Ockham, which posited God’s unknowable potentia absoluta in complex dialectic with his knowable poten- tia ordinata. Because theologians could not know how God exercised his potentia absoluta in the making of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2016
... Protestantism and the Enlightenment to abiding reifications and the catastrophes of modernity in their Dialectic of Enlightenment (Dialektik der Aufklärung, 1944, rev. 1947).17 Or Ernst Bloch, who delivers a striking account of Christ’s historicity and the utopian dimensions of Christian love and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 453–467.
Published: 01 September 2007
... nineteenth-century periodizing narrative. In his magisterial Philosophy of History, Hegel reaches back to the sixteenth century in order to set the modern age into motion. As the Spirit of Consciousness sweeps across the millennia and the globe, history advances dialectically toward the telos of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 505–518.
Published: 01 September 2000
... Persian origin, appears in Arabic as b≤danj≤n or b≤dinj≤n, but its variant in the dialects of Algeria, Morocco, and Muslim Spain is b≤dinj≤l, so that it is pro- nounced almost like b≤dinjel.30 B≤dinj≤l∑, with the final i of the Arabic gen- itive case, would thus mean...