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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 629–662.
Published: 01 September 2005
... to be identifi ed with the fi gures of the chaste goddesses Diana and Pallas, and that the purpose of such work is to proclaim her opposition to the sensuality, concupiscence, and levity associated with Venus and Cupid. More often than not, such an apparently doctrinaire affi rmation of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 489–508.
Published: 01 September 2005
..., disciplines. In this essay, I scrutinize the triumphalist account of Petrarch as Renaissance man by looking directly to Petrarch’s own work of triumphs, the Trionfi . This work narrates the triumphs of, successively, Cupid, Chas- tity, Death, Fame, Time, and Eternity. I concentrate on the fi rst...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 279–308.
Published: 01 May 2004
... this work enjoyed little circulation, one reader who did know The Love of Palamon and Arcite was Richard II’s chamber knight Sir John Clanvowe, whose Boke of Cupide, God of Loue quotes Chaucer’s poem in its opening lines: The god of love, a! benedicite, How myghty and how grete a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 349–384.
Published: 01 May 2005
...- dio, Her piteous song is immediately followed by Cupid’s entrance on a glittery cloud and celebration of Europa’s marriage to the great god, her wedding to the “mieglio del mondo” [best in the world] Th e scene ends by transforming the stage set into an image of contemporary Man- tua, once...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 457–466.
Published: 01 September 2005
... predecessors. In “Subjects of Triumph and Literary History: Dido and Petrarch in Petrarch’s Africa and Trionfi ,” Simpson examines two of Petrarch’s Trionfi , that of Cupid and of Chastity, to show that literary history is created as a result of repeated sub- missions to an imperial project. By reshaping...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 331–373.
Published: 01 May 2009
... arc of his urine echoing that of wine leaking from the nearby keg.55 In an anony- mous engraving, Fountain of Cupids (see fig. 6), winged putti pissing into the fountain’s basin are joined by six comrades below, one of whom col- lects “urine” in both his mouth and a cup. A proverb probably joked...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 579–594.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., now not in sheep’s but student’s clothing, reappears again and again to symbolize ingenium gone wrong — wit and instruction pressed into the service of cupidity or vice. Those wolves are everywhere, filling the fables with their slyness. Sometimes their significance is bluntly put: one...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 469–491.
Published: 01 September 2007
... shed light on her beautiful features. This is, of course, a strangely transgendered version of the Cupid and Psyche story: as in their story, separation is the con- sequence, but with the difference that the Cupid figure, the woman, imme- diately loses her magic powers as a result of Partonopeu’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 349–378.
Published: 01 May 2001
... distinguish the Christian God of love from both the classical Cupid with his bow and the Old Testa- ment God of wrath. Both comparisons appear strikingly inappropriate. The language of military discipline, in particular, has sometimes led critics to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2012) 42 (1): 83–105.
Published: 01 January 2012
..., Cupid removes the fiery dart from Amans’s heart and Venus anoints his wound. Having been thus “castrated” by Cupid, Amans is now in an uncomfortable parallel with the envious subject whose amorous desire has been quenched.57 Looking in Venus’s “wonder Mirour” (VIII.2821), the narrator sees...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 643–666.
Published: 01 September 2006
.... $59.95. Úbeda de los Cobos, Andrés. Annibale Carracci’s “Venus, Adonis and Cupid.” With María Álvarez-Garcillán Morales and Ana González Mozo. London: Paul Holberton Publishing for the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, 2005. 99 pp.; 80 color plates. Paper $50.00. [Catalogue of an exhi- bition...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
..., the book and tears symbolizing her repentance.38 The ointment bottle containing scented oil or balm works as a hinge between these two aspects of her legend and thus is critical to under- standing (and staging) both Mary Magdalene’s descent into cupidity and her penitent submission at the feet...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 339–374.
Published: 01 May 2000
...- formed 1611–13); his Escapes of Jupiter (1625 a sequence of Olympian rape and seduction scenes; and his royally acclaimed Love’s Mistress or the Queen’s Masque (performed 1634), based largely on Apuleius and focusing on Cupid and Psyche.20 He was equally interested in British and urban his- tory...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
.... Taylor / The Compounded Body  169 Spenser omits writing a stanza about Alma’s genitalia.68 Hamilton’s note to stanza 29 explains that the sexual organs are not described because Alma has not yet felt Cupid’s rage. Alma’s body is, he says, “epicene, contain- ing only what both sexes have in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 523–557.
Published: 01 September 2008
... Finucci / Sexual Remedies in the New World  525 wedding, Vincenzo had surprisingly chosen to march as Cupid’s Petrarchan slave in the Trionfo dell’amore carriage. Taking what would have been right- fully his son’s place, Vincenzo had made it clear that he thought of himself as a youthful prisoner of...