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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 147–166.
Published: 01 January 2017
... sociability in late medieval Burgundian cities. © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 microhistory medieval Burgundian pardon letters masculinity and violence crime and testimony life narrative • Crime and Testimony...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 385–428.
Published: 01 May 2005
...Shannon Miller © by Duke University Press 2005 Textual Crimes and Punishment in Mary Wroth’s Urania Shannon Miller Temple University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2017
... knowledge. The articles that follow, by the roundtable particpants themselves, bring microhistorical methodology to the study of social and cultural history, legal history, the history of crime, gender history (making use of the often overlooked potential in literary texts), and global history. These...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 545–571.
Published: 01 September 2013
... issues surrounding crime, mercy, and punishment that sanctuary inspired. © 2013 by Duke University Press 2013 a Stranger Artisans and the London Sanctuary of St. Martin le Grand in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 January 2015
...Romedio Schmitz-Esser This essay looks at the practice of burning corpses in the Middle Ages. Much research has concentrated on the later medieval period; however, the punishment of burning and its specific motivations and rationales for crimes such as heresy, witchcraft, and magic go back to much...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 7–52.
Published: 01 January 2015
... governed by local political conditions. © 2015 by Duke University Press 2015 physical body crime and capital punishment early modern confraternities a Body Politics: The Criminal Body between Public and Private...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 263–290.
Published: 01 May 2006
....” It was “the most profound of sins — the ultimate rejection of divine grace — and the overwhelming sinful- ness of suicide eclipsed any perception of it as a crime.”8 Christian doctrine and popular folklore combined to reinforce the notion that suicides must be judged harshly. In a marked...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 103–130.
Published: 01 January 2015
.... The city government had the men arrested. Two of them — Guglielmo Piazza and Giacomo Mora —  were tortured immediately and ultimately forced to confess to crimes they never committed. In the end, they were brutally executed, and the city razed Giacomo’s home and erected a column — the so...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 41–62.
Published: 01 January 2000
... sexual relations with women involved Katherina Hetzeldorfer from Nuremberg. For her crime (which bears no name in the proceedings) she was drowned in the imperial city of Speyer in 1477. In my reading of the Speyer document, the polyphonous nature of court...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 283–312.
Published: 01 May 2001
... pretense of a religious mission to sow traitorous plots against Eliza- beth and in favor of Mary.22 Speaking for the government in The Execution of Justice in England, Lord Burghley insists that Jesuit missionaries have been executed for their political crimes—specifically...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 309–338.
Published: 01 May 2000
... prominence of the crime. Yet even for the “Witch County” of Essex, the numbers of the witches and their victims in pamphlets and ballads were significantly higher than those in surviving indictments in assize records.3 There were important ideological reasons for this boom in witchcraft docu...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 327–348.
Published: 01 May 2005
... criminal could possibly know Finally, the information supplied by confession was supposed to be exam- Krause / Confessional Fictions and Demonology 329 ined and verifi ed by other means. However, when it came to “occult crimes,” jurists acknowledged the diffi culty of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 327–358.
Published: 01 May 2017
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 193–198.
Published: 01 January 2017
....: Stanford University Press, 1987). 13 Peter Arnade and Elizabeth Colwill, “Crime and Testimony: Life Narratives, Pardon Letters, and Microhistory,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 47, no. 1 (2017): 147 – 66, quotations at 147 and 149. 14 Sara Petrosillo, “A Microhistory of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 93–115.
Published: 01 January 2011
... form of capi- tal punishment for criminals. Indeed, Las Casas condones the Mexica use of sacrifice as a form of corporal punishment: “the rulers of the Mexicans have the right to sacrifice living men to their gods, provided they have been condemned for a crime” (Defense, 45). Montezuma himself...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 375–399.
Published: 01 May 2000
... Modern Studies / 30.2 / 2000 That here is mingled with thy Sacrifice: But dare reade even thy Wanton Story, As thy Confession, not thy Glory. And will so envie Both to future times That they would buy thy Goodnesse, with thy Crimes.14 Besides...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2002) 32 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2002
... as the possibil- ity that its injury to the king’s majesty would become public. It compares the scandal of such crimes to sodomy, and dictates that, in trials of such crimes, there should be no audience of any kind “e en nient notoires pec- chez sen teust chescune langue” [and in cases that were...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 217–244.
Published: 01 May 2005
... have noted, the historical construction of incest shows that its nature as a crime is exclusively discursive: no single, universal doctrine of sin can be applied to incest across the entire history of man Incestuous relationships were a requirement for the procreation of the species, and, as...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 225–248.
Published: 01 January 2004
....; 114 plates. $55.00. 8. Law and transgression Beattie, J. M. Policing and Punishment in London, 1660–1750: Urban Crime and the Limits of Terror. Oxford: Oxford University Press, (2001) 2002. xx, 491 pp.; 11 plates, 30 tables, 2 figs, 1 map. Paper $28.95. Breay, Claire. Magna Carta: Manuscripts...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2012) 42 (1): 225–244.
Published: 01 January 2012
... $35.00. 5. Law Appleby, John C., and Paul Dalton, eds. Outlaws in Medieval and Early Modern England: Crime, Government, and Society, c. 1066  –   c. 1600. Farn- ham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2009. 184 pp. $99.95. Brundage, James A. The Medieval Origins of the Legal Profession: Canonists, Civilans...