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coronation

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 355–377.
Published: 01 May 2006
...Robert Epstein Duke University Press 2006 a Eating Their Words: Food and Text in the Coronation Banquet of Henry VI Robert Epstein...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 251–282.
Published: 01 May 2001
... Elizabeth Tudor’s Coronation Entry Sandra Logan University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California The problem of historiography is, above all else, a problem of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 263–290.
Published: 01 May 2006
... his age, made an unfortunate choice of playthings when he picked up a pair of shears and wounded himself in the throat, a fatal injury leading to his death later that same day. In many ways, Richard’s behavior was not unlike that of many other children his age in medieval England. The coroners...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2006) 36 (1): 75–102.
Published: 01 January 2006
... associated with his death: his mock- or derisive coronation with a paper crown. Richard’s death is chosen in part because of the richness and creativity of its repre- sentation within fifteenth-century historical writing, and in part because it issues in that early play of (or at least largely by...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2002) 32 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2002
... or surrendered to others certain rights and lands “que appertaine al Corone.”36 Because rights and lands, which the king was permitted to use, were now interpreted as belonging to the Crown (thus to the whole realm) and not simply the king, they were considered to be inalienable.37 It is, in fact...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 47–89.
Published: 01 January 2003
... historical documents designating queenship as a pub- lic office or position with attendant rights and responsibilities. While the roles of other key political players, such as kings and clerics, were laid out in coronation ceremonies, clerical treatises, and monastic rules, queens’ roles were far less...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 275–308.
Published: 01 May 2000
... grandfather were lawyers), Rastell attended the Middle Temple in London, and then returned home to Coven- try to practice, where he succeeded his father as coroner. Rastell’s immersion in local affairs is significant, for Coventry was a town in serious economic trouble due to the combined effects of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 149–172.
Published: 01 January 2010
... dramatization of Elizabeth’s coronation in 1559 with which the play ends, the Lord Mayor, representative of all the people of the city, publicly gives the new queen a vernacular Bible, inspiring her to an extended apostrophe to this “jewel,” newly freed from its bonds: 154  Journal of Medieval and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 347–371.
Published: 01 May 2010
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 67–92.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., human sacrifice, and paganism inspired by the 78 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 41.1 / 2011 Figure 6. Mexican coronation ceremony. Historia Antipodum, 59. Courtesy Collection Maritiem Museum Rotterdam. devil, as well as tales of legendary creatures like the giants usually...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 467–488.
Published: 01 September 2005
... ’l cappello. (Par. [with changed voice now and with changed fl eece, I will return a poet, and at the font of my baptism I will take the crown (literally, little cap It is important to note that Dante’s coronation in Paradiso does not involve the laurel crown that...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2009
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 January 2004
... Anthony Pagden in The Idea of Europe and, within that trajectory of east to west, there is plenty of evidence for empires and for empire-building in the early medieval world.1 Within Europa, the imperial coronation of Charlemagne on Christmas Day in 800 is a well- known reference point for thinking...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 197–218.
Published: 01 January 2010
... $26.50. Hunt, Alice. The Drama of Coronation: Medieval Ceremony in Early Mod- ern England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. x, 242 pp. $99.00. Jensen, Phebe. Religion and Revelry in Shakespeare’s Festive World. Cam- bridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. xii, 267 pp.; 6 illus. $99.00...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 419–440.
Published: 01 May 2015
... Press, 2013. xiv, 301 pp.; 5 maps, 4 tables. $95.00. Rodwell, Warwick. The Coronation Chair and Stone of Scone: History, Archaeology, and Conservation. With contributions by Marie Louise Sau- erberg, Ptolemy Dean, and Eddie Smith. Westminster Abbey Occasional Papers (series 3), vol. 2. Oxford...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 327–358.
Published: 01 May 2017
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 571–595.
Published: 01 September 2009
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 269–305.
Published: 01 May 2012
... with loosened hair were brides (sometimes) and queens at their coronations; in both rituals, women’s unbound hair emphasized the sexuality with which they enticed their husbands to bed and produced heirs Why, then, did effigies of dead maidens display them with long, loosened, unbound...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2013
... more recently by scholars concerned with performances in meaningful places outside of, as well as in, theater buildings proper, such as in studies of royal pageantry, progress, and coronation by Janette Dillon, Julie Sanders, Andrew McRae, and Alice Hunt; and there is a continuing movement...