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constantinople

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 515–544.
Published: 01 September 2011
... to the courts of Muslim and Greek Orthodox rulers. The cosmopolitan potential of chivalry finds its limit in Tafur’s writing about Constantinople. Marked by circumspection about the kinds of cross-cultural and interfaith exchanges that characterized Mediterranean courts, the Andanças ’ treatment of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 469–491.
Published: 01 September 2007
... Con- stantinople, 1453, was held to mark the close of the Middle Ages. Nowadays, we know too well the stream of history flows on relentlessly and there is never a barrier across it.3 There is never a barrier across it: Runciman alludes here to the history of Constantinople...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2006) 36 (1): 221–222.
Published: 01 January 2006
... that crosses, reassesses, or explores alternatives to what Judith Bennett calls “the great divide.” Such work might reexamine the idea of the Renaissance through its defining events: for example, the spread of humanism, the “fall of Constantinople,” and the English and European Reformations...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 57–74.
Published: 01 January 2007
... cancelling one another out. Even the religious divide, which had so animated men in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and which still split the late medieval Mediterranean in half diagonally, was more apparent than real. The north and west, from Valencia to Constantinople, may have been in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 707–710.
Published: 01 September 2005
... alternatives to what Judith Bennett calls “the great divide.” Such work might reexamine the idea of the Renaissance through its defi ning 708 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 35.3 / 2005 events: for example, the spread of humanism, the “fall of Constantinople,” and the English and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 163–195.
Published: 01 January 2007
.... Pericone, however, is soon stabbed by his own brother, who wants Alatiel for himself. This inaugurates a string of adventures in which Alatiel passes from one man to another — including two Genoese shipown- ers, the prince of Achaea, the duke of Athens, the prince of Constantinople, the Turkish emir...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 23–45.
Published: 01 January 2003
... Arcadius to all the churches of the East, creating a highway of sanctity from Jerusalem to Constantinople. For Vigilantius to condemn Jerome and Jerusalem, he must also condemn the emperor and Constantinople; likewise, for the emper- ors in the capital to claim religious dominion to complement their...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 97–139.
Published: 01 January 2007
... commissioned by patrons who may have selected the figures they wanted.4 Pietro della Valle, for example, who traveled from Venice to Constantinople on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, records having ordered one such collection in 1614.5 In the sixteenth century, costume books were produced by Western artists...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 447–451.
Published: 01 September 2007
... the “modern” temporal divide to define, and implicitly evaluate and rank, territory and people derives from earlier ages. Two essays in this collection reconsider dates traditionally employed to mark off the “premodern” from the “modern”: 1453, the fall of Constantinople, and 1492, the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 279–308.
Published: 01 May 2004
... to Tunis in 1390, he went on the king’s business to Rhodes later in 1390, and he died while sojourning outside Constantinople in 1391. Therefore, Clanvowe would have known this narrative not as part of the Canterbury Tales but only as the substantial Ricardian poem of the 1380s when he was a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 493–515.
Published: 01 September 2003
..., had announced his decision to lead “the true philosophical life,” at Žrst to his city, and then to friends in Constantinople and elsewhere. Though he had received advanced training in Athens, his decision came as a surprise to many, who had expected him to embark on the more custom- ary as well...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 539–560.
Published: 01 September 2006
... of the post – First Crusade era and remained largely stable for the next sev- eral centuries.23 Jerusalem and Constantinople were described in particularly uto- Burgwinkle / Utopia and Its Uses  543 pian terms. Neither was thought to be the Earthly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 125–156.
Published: 01 January 2000
... whom it was given or made available. England’s duplicitous policy went into effect when, later in 1578, William Harborne, a merchant of the Poland Company, was dispatched overland to Constantinople. To cloak his arrival and purposes, Harborne and his...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2008) 38 (1): 79–101.
Published: 01 January 2008
... between them. For thus do the laws of our fathers the kings of olden time, teach us.15 Both this sentiment and its “international” viewpoint are earlier to be found in a letter of Nicholas I, patriarch of Constantinople, to a figure whom he calls “the most glorious and brilliant Emir...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 9–55.
Published: 01 January 2007
... Constantinople, then Venice, Rome, France, and Spain, back to Tarifa at the Street [sic] (of Gibraltar) opposite Tangier. The Mediterranean is also called the Roman Sea or the Syrian Sea. It contains many populous islands. Some of them are large, such as Crete, Cyprus, Sicily...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 January 2007
... island empire. By the late 1570s, conflict with Spain had encouraged Elizabeth I to support the English merchants who wished 76  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 37.1 / 2007 to form an alliance with the Ottoman sultanate, to establish an embassy in Constantinople, and to negotiate...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2018) 48 (2): 201–226.
Published: 01 May 2018
... throne of Wallachia, among those who had embraced the Catholic faith or were willing to do so. Yet, in the ecumenical patri- arch of Constantinople addresses the same voivode “as a most legitimate and most beloved son.” On April , Pope Urban V admonishes Voivode Vladislav, son and successor of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 419–440.
Published: 01 May 2015
... Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople, c. 1175–1237. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. xiv, 221 pp.; 5 illus., 5 maps, 3 genealogies. $90.00. Scattergood, John. John Skelton: The Career of an Early Tudor Poet. Lon- don: Four Courts Press, 2014. 432 pp.; 1 illus. $74.50. Smith, J. Beverley...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 79–112.
Published: 01 January 2001
... (laisses 218–25).30 The differences between this list and Fulcher’s are striking: the Greeks are conspicuously absent (even though Roland boasts of having conquered Constantinople) and the Armenians—eastern Christians with whom the crusaders contracted political...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 511–544.
Published: 01 September 2009
... But now, he goes on to say, although an ambassador is still sent to Syria, he no longer dresses “in this way, for this grandeur and splendor have been better preserved in those who preside as Baili in Constantinople — or, more precisely, shifted over to them, because the great lord of the Turks...