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compassion

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2019) 49 (2): 265–294.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Jessica Hines Building on recent critical conversations in the history of the emotions, this article examines how the language of compassion came into English culture and how it was deployed for theological and political purposes. It traces the growth of compassion in England in the early fifteenth...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 533–565.
Published: 01 September 2022
..., compassion) as a virtue which “through . . . the effect of love” allows one person to “[look] upon his friend as another self.” While Aquinas explains that through this compassionate identification the observer “counts his friend's hurt as his own, so that he grieves for his friend's hurt as though he were...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 41–67.
Published: 01 January 2022
... the extent or, importantly, the causes of ecological catastrophe. Its forms suggest that creation's compassion for Christ's suffering actually results in violent self-destruction—a suggestion that troubles twenty-first-century narratives of ecological catastrophe and human responsibility. Although the motif...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 83–105.
Published: 01 January 2012
... inherent in one’s relationship to one’s neighbor. Gower’s tales explore the proximity of envy and compassion, asking crucial questions about how envious identification can be turned instead into compassionate likeness, and commenting on the larger project of exemplarity and mimetic narrative. © 2012...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 167–188.
Published: 01 January 2016
... with others unless another has experienced a degree of similar suffering: “Diseases which we never felt in ourselves come but to a compassion of others that have endured them; nay, compassion itself comes to no great degree if we have not felt in some proportion in ourselves that which we lament...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 283–312.
Published: 01 May 2001
... interpretation of a case requires the use of verbal tricks and deceptions that will distract him (or her) away from the rigor of the law.16 In Aristotle’s account, equity encourages a compassion- ate interpretation of a case by drawing attention to human character...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 327–358.
Published: 01 May 2017
... and Wonderful History of Perkin Warbeck. Both historians denigrate Perkin’s pity for the people as sheer sentiment: Gainsford describes Perkin’s “ridiculous mercy and foolish compassion,” and Bacon ridicules Perkin for “acting the part of a prince handsomely” to make his “great lamentation” against...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 299–323.
Published: 01 May 2010
..., be determined by the accuracy of the compass and the reliability of the clock (LL 14). The instabil- Kimmel / Interpreting Inaccuracy  303 ity of sixteenth-century cartography’s conventions results from the techno- logical limitations of these instruments, and so...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 323–342.
Published: 01 May 2015
...” showed “compassion” as “the sun was darkened” (Matt. 27:45), the “earth did quake; the rocks clave asunder; the veil of the temple rent asunder” (Matt. 27:51).12 When He arose, both heaven and earth rejoiced; in his ascension, a bright cloud received him and took him up (Acts 1:9). When he sent...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (2): 227–260.
Published: 01 May 2018
... “may neuer forgete hise, so luuand [loving] he is and so reuthfull [full of compassion]” (fol. v; – There is a similar move between the abstraction of “trewe bileue” (fol. v; and the “luue bonde” [love bond] that creates emotional ties of a ection: “Ihesu, yat is salueoure [savior...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 567–591.
Published: 01 September 2022
... of Augustine, provide a compassionate portrait of Christ's humanity, and mount an argument for peace. 14 Benjamin Parris describes oikeiôsis as an ecology of care: For the stoics, animal life is born with an innate understanding of its constitution as a living being endowed with certain physical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2014
...), 63. See Sharon Cameron’s discussion in Impersonality: Seven Essays (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007), 118 – 21. 13 Jennifer Summit, “Renaissance Humanism and the Future of the Humanities,” Lit- erature Compass 9/10 (2012): 665 – 78, at 665. The phrase “crisis...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
... that mastering social exigency is inflected by gender as much as status. Prefaced by antifeminist outrage — “Þer is no fraude fully equipollent [equal in degree] / To þe fraude and sleiȝty compass- ing [treacherous plotting] / Of a womman, nor like in worchynge [execut- ing]” (3.4332 – 34) — and hedged...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 219–251.
Published: 01 May 2022
... dramatically by including words deriving from Latin pati (patient, compassion, compatible). The common linguistic ancestry uncovers an implicit connection between measurement and touch, and consequently, between measurement and feeling. That connection is explicitly made in late medieval popular religion...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 583–602.
Published: 01 September 2016
..., patience, self-­sacrifice, forgiveness, compassion, service, and generosity simply was Christianity,” “not something called ‘religion’ distinguished from the rest of life, but rather all of life lived in a certain way” (134). If medi- eval Christians had not perfected the virtue part of this equation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 577–585.
Published: 01 September 2021
... (2011): 1–30. 10 See, by Carol Symes, A Common Stage: Theater and Public Life in Medieval Arras (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2007); “The History of Medieval Theatre / Theatre of Medieval History: Dramatic Documents and the Performance of the Past,” History Compass 7, no. 3 (2009...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2017
... includes this story “bycause somme menne wylle beleue nothynge that is out of the compasse of theyr owne knowledge & yet som of them presume to haue knowlege aboue any other, contempnynge all men but them selfes, or such as they fauour” (sig. Q4r). The giant’s bones and tooth, then, are threatening...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 7–52.
Published: 01 January 2015
... tired and battered little boat Then every effort, that to the depths of my soul I have endured, will be lost and in vain.28 Another example is from “Have Mercy O highest eternal God”: . . . I pray that your compassion does not want to abandon me on this final...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 269–291.
Published: 01 May 2020
... with compassion and horror. See, for example, Margarete 28.1, 54.3; and Juliene 60.3. Fromer argues in Spectators of Martyrdom that this dynamic is reflective of the texts focus on audi- ence and conversion. 36 Scarry, The Body in Pain, 22, original emphasis. 37 See James Simpson, Moving Images, in his...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 147–172.
Published: 01 January 2004
... than a purely scientific concern relating to the points of the compass.12 For the tradition that shaped his work also portrayed Britain/Albion/England as remote and thereby implied that it was less than civilized. For a Roman pagan like Pliny, this remoteness was a political matter because...