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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 173–190.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Su Mei Kok Spanning a thirty-eight-mile canal, a walled reservoir, and a city-wide network of wooden mains, London’s New River altered terrain from Hertfordshire to the city. A vital shift in London’s spatial order attended these topographical changes, as public space became a private commodity...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 473–485.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Margaret A. Pappano; Nicole R. Rice As an economic category, artisans are typically bounded by two historical markers: on one side, the rise of urban centers in the medieval period, and on the other side, the reorganization of commodity production as a result of industrial capitalization in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 643–672.
Published: 01 September 2004
... pos- sibly could—to purchase a commodity whose value was so refi ned as to sur- pass the cash they gave in exchange for it, even if this nebulous increment, entirely aesthetic, was something they knew could never be possessed in a meaningful way since it evanesced almost instantly and did not...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 575–599.
Published: 01 September 2000
... the social and economic implications of the language in which these two fictions refer to work: in The Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale, werk, multiplie, and privetee, and in The Alchemist, venture and commodity. 578 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 30.3 / 2000...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 611–642.
Published: 01 September 2004
... reexport trade. Spices and other Indian commodities, for example, indigo, were brought into England and then resold in the European market as a means to acquire bullion. Simultane- ously, the company developed a substantial port-to-port trade in India itself, with Surat at its center. The result was...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 659–661.
Published: 01 September 2011
... in the medieval period, on one side, and the reorganization of commodity production as a result of industrial capitalization in the early modern period on the other. Although there is important variety within the category, artisans were a distinct and readily identifiable group in the late...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 507–509.
Published: 01 May 2012
... Volume 43 / Number 3 / Fall 2013 As a specific economic category, artisans are typically bounded by two his- torical markers: the rise of urban centers in the medieval period, on one side, and the reorganization of commodity production as a result of industrial capitalization in the early modern...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2012) 42 (1): 245–247.
Published: 01 January 2012
... period, on one side, and the reorganization of commodity production as a result of industrial capitalization in the early modern period on the other. Although there is important variety within the category, artisans were a distinct and readily identifiable group in the late medieval and early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 523–548.
Published: 01 September 2004
... functioning of the household. The illusions of the commodity market had not yet masked 530 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 34.3 / 2004 these relations. But, although the surplus that marks the feudal household is not the same as the surplus ultimately produced by the operations of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 473–522.
Published: 01 September 2004
... more or less a self-suffi cient “natural economy” which was dominated by the production of use-values which were immediately consumed by the producers and within which only a “very insignifi cant portion” of the agricultural product entered circulation as commodities (24:312; 25:259; 26:557; 27...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 17–40.
Published: 01 January 2002
... transformation of the detritus of Western commodity culture into a valuable object is popular cinema’s treat- ment of the phenomenon known to anthropologists as the cargo cult, a term coined by anthropologists to describe the refashioning by Pacific islanders of worthless detritus washed ashore from Western...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 183–200.
Published: 01 January 2009
... economies speak to cacao’s emergence from a system of native exchange to a valuable commodity in a growing transatlantic food culture that was rapidly transforming Old World tastes.9 English encounters with chocolate (textual or otherwise) before the seventeenth century were rare. José Juan de...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 623–653.
Published: 01 September 2013
... commodities fell under the category of “arts and crafts,” or mechanical arts, in the late seventeenth century. Around the time that Evelyn made his list, imported crafts soon to become essential to France’s international image arrived on the scene. They included foreign technologies for luxuries such as...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 January 2007
... flourished in spite of the dangers there and the resistance of other interests. The English learned to traffic with the Turk, and this brought them into contact with new commodities and trade routes. This increased their knowledge of the global trade system and fired their desire to initiate more...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 427–431.
Published: 01 September 2002
... with aristocratic hospitality based on land tenure in the countryside. Both the wool grown there, as well as the imported silk, satin, and velvet, were commodities; a discourse of national identity is marshalled to shore up the central industry of England. What may at first seem to be an argument...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2009
... ideological vectors. Chocolate is considered by Edmund Campos as illustrative of the economic relationships developed between Europe and the Americas, from cacao’s pre-Columbian function as an object of barter to its status as highly prized commodity for European consumers in a network of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 573–597.
Published: 01 September 2013
... elusive commodities, wearing out their shoes in the process of fuelling an unending cycle of commerce. The painted image of “the Last,” or wooden form on which shoes were made, seems to promise that we have found what we are looking for — if what we are looking for is an artisan’s utopia — by...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2001) 31 (3): 607–658.
Published: 01 September 2001
..., but a fundamental element in the moral evaluation of all economic activity.41 Pressed by the decretal Naviganti, Olivi formu- lated a general rule of risk-taking in commerce: canon law’s prohibition is bypassed, he argues, only when the investor has the ownership and the use of the commodity which...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 463–472.
Published: 01 September 2004
... sacramental) languages that accrue to Capital’s theatri- cal accounts of commodity fetishism have a more than incidental bearing on the production of sacrament within the history of dramatic spectacle, from the fi fteenth-century mystery plays through Shakespeare. It is our hope that “The Marxist Premodern...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 373–404.
Published: 01 May 2004
..., the chief commodities required for the lying-in were textiles, especially the curtains or hangings used to enclose the bedchamber. Such furnishings had practical uses, which Stubbes acknowledges. Beyond their “manuall uses and servyle occupations,” they were also decorative. But this was not simply...