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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 279–308.
Published: 01 May 2004
...John M. Bowers © by Duke University Press 2004 Three Readings of The Knight’s Tale: Sir John Clanvowe, Geoffrey Chaucer, and James I of Scotland...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 211–246.
Published: 01 May 2000
...Jennifer Summit © by Duke University Press 2000 Topography as Historiography: Petrarch, Chaucer, and the Making of Medieval Rome Jennifer Summit...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Holly A. Crocker This article argues that Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida continues an important late medieval poetic tradition that highlights the troubling consequences of virtue’s performativity for idealized women. If Chaucer is pessimistic about the potential for Criseyde’s ethical agency...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 61–87.
Published: 01 January 2016
... structures but also understood the inherent limitation that emplotment and narrativization entails. Focusing on a doctor, John Arderne, a patient-poet, Thomas Hoccleve, and a poet, Geoffrey Chaucer, the essay explores how all three reveal their understanding of the artifice of narrativizing pain and illness...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2019) 49 (1): 7–31.
Published: 01 January 2019
...Eleanor Johnson This essay argues that Chaucer’s much- unloved “Monk’s Tale,” rather than being a failure or misfire on Chaucer’s part, actually constitutes a high- water mark of the bold and experimental literary theory that characterizes much of Chaucer’s later career. In this case, the Monk...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2006) 36 (1): 103–134.
Published: 01 January 2006
...Katherine C. Little © by Duke University Press / 2006 2006 a Images, Texts, and Exegetics in Chaucer’s Second Nun’s Tale Katherine C. Little Fordham...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2001) 31 (3): 507–560.
Published: 01 September 2001
...Lee Patterson © by Duke University Press 2001 a “The Living Witnesses of Our Redemption”: Martyrdom and Imitation in Chaucer’s Prioress’s Tale...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 437–460.
Published: 01 September 2017
... Chaucer's Canterbury Tales , it argues that interpretations of the Bible dependent on these codicological forms are more germane to the understanding of Chaucer's text than Robertsonian hermeneutics. Attention to three kinds of manuscript compilations that include biblical material illustrate some of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 173–195.
Published: 01 January 2010
... by its superior historical self-awareness. This essay reassesses these themes through a reading of Shakespeare and Fletcher's The Two Noble Kinsmen (1634). This is a play of knighthood and chivalric spectacle, adapted from Chaucer's Knight's Tale , which brings Chaucer on stage in the play's prologue...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 7–30.
Published: 01 January 2009
... Spain of the converso, a hybrid who blurs the boundaries between Christian and Jew. Using recent psychoanalytic criticism of the Prioress's Tale , Chaucer's sentimentalized representation of the murdered child's mother is contrasted with the very different one in Damián de Vegas's Memoria del Santo...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2019) 49 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2019
...David Aers; Sarah Beckwith “Go, litel bok, go, litel myn tragedye.” So wrote Chaucer at the end of Troilus and Criseyde . But how compatible are the forms and ideas of tragedy with Christian tradition, its theology and liturgy? What are the relations between medieval and early modern discourses of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 449–462.
Published: 01 September 2000
... English crown in Ire- land. I am interested in how these blood laws seep into the debate over nobility intrinsic to Chaucer’s Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale. The divided and overlapping technologies of blood laws and pedagogy in this medieval example challenge us...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 575–599.
Published: 01 September 2000
... technological expertise and spiritual insight, would enhance human happiness. Two of the great English comic writers, maybe the two greatest, wrote directly about alchemy. For both Geoffrey Chaucer’s audience and Ben Jonson’s, I will claim, alchemy was a practice familiar...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 411–412.
Published: 01 May 2017
... Modern Edited by David Aers and Sarah Beckwith Volume 49 / Number 1 / January 2019 “Go, litel bok, go, litel myn tragedye.” So wrote Chaucer at the end of Troilus and Criseyde. But how compatible are the forms and ideas of tragedy with Christian tradition, its theology and liturgy? What are the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 13–24.
Published: 01 January 2005
... critique of Eamon Duff y’s The Strip- ping of the Altarss at a New Chaucer Society conference, spoke of a tendency to “photograph and bewail” a ruined medieval past. Simpson is not touched by this tendency: indeed, there are moments of jouissance in his writing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2003) 33 (2): 311–334.
Published: 01 May 2003
... illustrated by Geoffrey Chaucer’s Pardoner, who will be discussed below. But all the blame may not be laid at the feet of the quaestores. Some popes themselves went beyond the limits of strict theological propriety—as when, for example, Celestine V, on the occasion of his consecration (in 1294) in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 185–210.
Published: 01 May 2000
... questions of how archival practices and archival encounters structure and control our reading of medieval books and the texts they contain. John Gower might seem at first glance a peculiar choice for this exploration. The manuscripts of his more famous contemporary, Geoffrey Chaucer, are in some ways...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 679–681.
Published: 01 September 2013
...”: Virtue Trouble from Chaucer to Shakespeare  303 – 334 Duncan, Helga L. “Here at the Fringe of the Forest”: Staging Sacred Space in As You Like It  121 – 144 Jones, Christine A. Exotic Edibles: Coffee, Tea, Chocolate, and the Early Modern French How-to  623 – 653 Kermode, Lloyd Edward...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 25–38.
Published: 01 January 2005
... bureaucrats in diaries” At other times, one has to register a hesitancy, even in the face of some dazzling juxtaposition. By contrast, for instance, with the necessary return of Gower and Chaucer, in the Confessio and Troilus, to the public world from which they have tried to sequester themselves...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 511–517.
Published: 01 September 2012
... text in the manuscript is an imperfect version of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Parliament of Fowls.3 The works in Laud Misc. 416 thus comprise a fairly tidy thematic package; as David Lorenzo Boyd notes, the texts attend to “socio-­political discourse” emphasizing common profit.4 Who, though, was...