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charlemagne

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 79–112.
Published: 01 January 2001
... of Charlemagne’s empire is disrupted by the historical layering linked to the process Robert Bartlett has memorably called the “europeanization of Europe” that resulted in, among other things, the emergence of “Frank” as a new collective identity. In part two, I...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 177–191.
Published: 01 May 2021
... légende de Charlemagne dans l'Empire germanique médiéval (Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1950), 321–26; Andrew J. Romig, “Charlemagne the Sinner: Charles the Great as Avatar of the Modern in Petrarch's Familiares 1.4,” in The Charlemagne Legend in Medieval Latin Texts , ed. William J. Purkis and Matthew...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... of Cordova employs a tactical mimesis to defeat the seemingly inde- fatigable cavalry of Charlemagne: At the point that our first contingent was about to join battle with the first contingent of the Saracens, a great crowd of their foot...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... by the gender ill prepared to face it. Saxony, the home of the Ottonian ruling house and Hrotsvit’s family, maintains a special status in the history of Christianity due to the ruthless violence of Charlemagne’s expansionist politics, including forced conversions that began a mere century and a half...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 387–402.
Published: 01 May 2022
... University, 2020. lxiv, 407 pp., 6 illus. $30.00. [The only major surviving anthology of Latin lyric poems spanning Charlemagne and the Battle of Hastings. Latin verse texts with facing-page English verse translations.] Blair, Ann, and Nicholas Popper, eds. New Horizons for Early Modern European...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 January 2004
... Anthony Pagden in The Idea of Europe and, within that trajectory of east to west, there is plenty of evidence for empires and for empire-building in the early medieval world.1 Within Europa, the imperial coronation of Charlemagne on Christmas Day in 800 is a well- known reference point for thinking...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 197–228.
Published: 01 May 2008
... models for representing the East, could be as “medieval” a Christian polemicist as Luther, invoking Charlemagne as a model Christian ruler and looking to restore what he understood to be the wide geographical influence of the early church.22 The very disparity of the figures just mentioned...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2009
... on Charles’s arms. An actor representing Charlemagne presented both sov- ereigns with a sword and imperial crown. According to pre-Reformation pageants, Henry VIII had inherited his imperial symbols of the sword and closed crown from Charlemagne. Charles V as Holy Roman Emperor, of 70  Journal...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 463–477.
Published: 01 September 2000
... of the Roncesvalles, or hybridity and ambiguity in the case of the Auto. Both texts serve an important purpose in the formation of a national canon. The Roncesvalles is cited as an example of how foreign epic material, that of Roland and Charlemagne, is nationalized, even in its scant...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2015
... death of some of them instigated in the past.8 It is also true that in family vaults bodies could be creatively arranged, if necessary, and indeed Finucci / Thinking through Death  3 many people in the Middle Ages believed that the Emperor Charlemagne...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2017
...- ing possibilities of microanalysis for a variety of problems in medieval history. See his Charlemagne’s Mustache and Other Cultural Clusters of a Dark Age (New York: Pal- grave Macmillan, 2004). 5 For a brief introduction to the “New Formalism,” see Marjorie Levinson, “What Is New...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 75–119.
Published: 01 January 2017
... was located on a bend of the Danube at its junction with the River Regen, from which the city derived its name. The Regen lay on the west side of the great Bavarian Forest, which could be seen across the Danube to the northeast of the city. Charlemagne held a number of important councils at Regensburg...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (1): 9–35.
Published: 01 January 2021
..., by at least two groups of nonpagans. 58 Carolus inperator is Charlemagne; Bernardus, Ernaldus, Wibelinus, all sons of Aimeri of Narbonne; Bertrandus palatinus is Bernardus s son; Borel is a familiar pagan. The complicating element is that neither Aimeri nor Guillaume appears in this fragment. 59 To support...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 January 2015
... as possible sources for justifying punishment by fire. Here, the laws established by Charlemagne to end the Saxon War are most pertinent. First, Carolingian legal codes prohibited the Saxons’ practice of burning witches.48 In light of other evidence, however, this Saxon prac- tice could have been...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 391–410.
Published: 01 May 2017
..., Cornel, ed. The Dark Side of Knowledge: Histories of Ignorance, 1400 – 1800. Intersections: Interdisciplinary Studies in Early Modern Cul- ture, vol. 46. Leiden: Brill, 2016. xviii, 436 pp.; 10 figs., 2 tables. $215.00. 3. Biographical studies Fried, Johannes. Charlemagne. Translated from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 537–561.
Published: 01 September 2003
..., Hampshire: Pal- grave, 2002. x, 154 pp.; 4 maps. $29.95. Morrissey, Robert. Charlemagne and France: A Thousand Years of Mythol- ogy. Translated by Catherine Tihanyi. The Laura Shannon Series in French Medieval Studies. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2003. xxi, 391 pp.; 24 plates...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 59–84.
Published: 01 January 2002
... romance published in the sixteenth century. The narrative recounts how Ralph fights with Magog, a Saracen knight, who is then converted by Charlemagne’s nephew Roland.48 Like Geoffrey’s Goemagog, he is a single figure rather than a race or a land. Although not specifically a giant as in Geoffrey and his...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 641–655.
Published: 01 September 2023
... of Charlemagne: Envisioning Empire in the Middle Ages . Explorations in Medieval Culture, vol. 15. Leiden: Brill, 2022. vi, 277 pp., 9 figs. Hardcover, ebook. Wiedemann, Benedict. Papal Overlordship and European Princes, 1000–1270 . Oxford Studies in Medieval European History. Oxford: Oxford University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 617–643.
Published: 01 September 2014
... of Godfrey of Bou- logne, first Christian ruler of Jerusalem, Lambert draws together the abstract ideal of Christian empire with a more specific imperial focus on the Franks, emphasizing Godfrey’s descent from Charlemagne in the genealogical tables of the Liber Floridus. In addition, however, Lambert...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 7–52.
Published: 01 January 2017
...: Your article also substantiates something interesting about military campaigns: when Charlemagne and other Carolingians went on campaign, they brought books and even a library with them. Dutton: Carolingian royalty traveled with a substantial treasury when on campaign, or when moving from palace...