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carthusian

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 699–724.
Published: 01 September 2012
...Katherine Zieman This essay explores the late medieval rhetoric of self-representation and conceptions of audience through an examination of the writings of the fifteenth-century Carthusian monk Richard Methley. Methley is considered as a “public contemplative” — a writer who offers his own...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 519–537.
Published: 01 September 2012
... 520  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 42.3 / 2012 female.10 A letter of 1545 from Van Ess asks Canisius for contributions for the Diest beguines who were Van Ess’s responsibility.11 He had intimate con- nections with the Carthusian house of St. Barbara at Cologne, where in fact he...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 511–517.
Published: 01 September 2012
... writings of the fifteenth-­century Carthusian monk Richard Methley. Considering Methley’s little-­studied Latin texts (which were evidently intended for a monastic audience, despite the Carthusians’ Warren / Monasticisms Medieval and Early Modern  515 reputation as...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 111–120.
Published: 01 January 2005
... that I misread Lydgate’s Danse Machabrré in an “extraordinary” way I have reread the Danse Machabrré and hold to my account of it as “minimally religious” or at least mini- mally soteriological. Certainly the Carthusian monk’s fi nal soteriological admonition sets the inadequacy of all other...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 25–38.
Published: 01 January 2005
... determination to demonstrate that the Dancee is a repre- sentativespectacu reformist poem seems to have led him into missing its point quite larly. The anchor of the meaning of the poem is in the portrayal of the Carthusian Monk and the Hermit, in whom Lydgate, like his French author, established...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 433–450.
Published: 01 May 2016
... commentaries by Remigius of Auxerre, Rupert of Deutz, Hildegard of Bingen, Andrew of Saint Victor, Peter Comester, Nicholas of Lyra, and Denis the Carthusian.] Cornett / New Books across the Disciplines  437 Sullivan, Joseph M., ed. and trans. Wigamur. German Romance...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 479–492.
Published: 01 September 2006
... used in 1126 by the Carthusian monks), tidal mills, glass mir- rors, and windmills were all introduced either for the first time or for the first time in Europe. (The post design for the windmill was an innovation brought to Europe by members of the Third Crusade.)21 A variety of genres...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 285–314.
Published: 01 May 2008
... characters of middle rank, Mayor, Carthusian, Gentlewoman, Astrono- mer, Merchant, Canon, and on again to characters of humble rank, Artisan, Labourer, Child, and finally Hermit. Although the Dance of Death has often been taken as emblematic of late medieval Christian religiosity, Lydgate’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 45–68.
Published: 01 January 2014
..., one of the founding members of the Royal Society, wrote to Robert Boyle saying he hoped to found a group of people who would “preserve science and cultivate them- selves.” The claustral space they inhabited would be constructed “somewhat after the manner of the Carthusians,” and the inhabitants...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 381–404.
Published: 01 May 2016
... with the challenges of the Reforma- tion,” and opposing “heterodoxy by means of a broad educative effort” in a manner parallel to contemporary efforts being made on the Continent by German Carthusians, among others. These studies attend to the moments in Whitford’s writings that see him...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 225–255.
Published: 01 May 2009
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 37–63.
Published: 01 January 2010
... his reign, osten- sibly by a Carthusian monk who had served as Henry’s confessor.47 Usually read as a complement to the cult, Blacman should rather be read as an effort to manage it, to insist on Henry’s regality and so reform the popular saint into a paradigm of divine kingship.48 In...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 317–343.
Published: 01 May 2011
... between lectio-­meditatio-­oratio-­operatio and contemplatio seen in Victorines, Cistercians, and Carthusians is elucidated here in terms of how inner and outer bodies relate to one another and is supplemented by the final term werke. Although the terms for reading are not systematically employed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 219–245.
Published: 01 May 2013
... inherence theory with its extramental intentions and real qualities. Moston’s personal notes docu- ment the “augmentation, rarefaction, and intension” of qualities.48 Reginald Pecock and the Carthusian theologian Thomas Netter of Walden continued to see intelligibility as a diminished kind of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2016
... “influence” of the Glossa Ordinaria on Langland’s poem. But as he later reads more and more in Christian traditions, he finds such allegorizations of Christ’s parables in St. Augustine, in Bede, in Dionysius the Carthusian, and in many, many other commentators. So what he had first excitedly and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2006) 36 (1): 35–74.
Published: 01 January 2006
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 5–40.
Published: 01 January 2000
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 397–453.
Published: 01 May 2006
... in 1639, following three decades of travel through continental Europe, and was greeted by a Catholic queen; she began her last years in Yorkshire living near Mount Grace, in a house once owned by the Carthusian community that had preserved, and four times commented upon, the Book of Margery...