1-20 of 43 Search Results for

cannibal

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 159–195.
Published: 01 January 2015
... of the article, emerges as a case study in pictorial indeterminancy: saintly power is both pivotal and marginalized; social class is both highlighted and obfuscated; cannibalism is both seen and unseen. These contradictions demonstrate the contested status of the social problems represented: female...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... impure women and Jewish men, and believed to be a carrier of the disease. The perceived threat of leprous blood to Christian bodily integrity was played out in atropaic social rituals and in widespread defamations against lepers, women, and Jews as devourers or cannibals. This study claims that such...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 93–115.
Published: 01 January 2011
...Edward M. Test One of the common denominators in the etchings of De Bry's multivolume America is corporal violence, whether it depicts the Spanish cruelties inflicted upon Native Americans or the cannibalism and sacrifices conducted by Amerindians. This essay examines sacrificial rituals from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 117–136.
Published: 01 January 2011
... uses to make clear distinctions among Span- iards, Englishmen, and natives, and how these distinctions employ Black Legend discourse to portray Spaniards as barbarous cannibals and make the racially different and unknown natives “like” the English.7 Through repeat- 118 Journal of Medieval and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2015) 45 (3): 639–641.
Published: 01 September 2015
... Presciutti, Diana Bullen Domesticating Cannibalism: Visual Rhetorics of Madness and Maternal Infanticide in Fifteenth-­Century Italy  159 – 195 Schmitz-­Esser, Romedio The Cursed and the Holy Body: Burning Corpses in the Middle Ages  131 – 157 Sherman, William, and Heather Wolfe The Department of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 41–58.
Published: 01 January 2002
... that Merlin and Aurelius establish these stones on Salisbury Plain clearly exemplifies 50 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 32.1 / 2002 “cannibal culture.” Deborah Root argues that a community defines its own identity by the consumption and translation of symbols appropriated from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 1–12.
Published: 01 January 2011
... individual scholar’s arguments about European understandings of the Native American other. In 1981, for example, Bernadette Bucher wrote a provocative structural- ist argument about gender and cannibalism, Icon and Conquest: A Structural Analysis of the Illustrations of de Bry’s Great Voyages .” 2 One...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 137–171.
Published: 01 January 2011
... people. Yet Léry upends European assumptions by observing and describing without sensationalism the rituals in which the Tupi kill captured enemies and sing songs about it: they eat them for reasons of revenge, not cruelty or hunger. His analysis of the function of cannibalism in this culture...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... same visual pleasures. The spectacle of the Saracen’s broken form is so much the center of narrative consumption for crusader romances that in Richard Coer de Lion the English king is depicted as an enthusiastic cannibal of such bodies in pieces, recommending that all...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2002
... translation that appropriate the histories of others (the Irish, the Britons) for England. Mannyng’s account of the magical translation of Stonehenge from Ireland to Salisbury Plain shows how artifact appropria- tion is an instance of “cannibal culture,” that is, the consumption and trans- formation of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 403–412.
Published: 01 September 2008
... with contaminated blood served to displace more fundamental anxieties generated by the emphasis on the body and bodily processes in core Christian beliefs. In particular, the “sacramental cannibalism” of the eucharistic feast, in which Christ’s body and blood are somehow fused with those of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 449–462.
Published: 01 September 2000
... behind in Ireland with her Irish grandfather. Crystede begins by repeating the stereotypes of the barbaric Irish already rendered by Gerald of Wales in the twelfth century. To them he adds purported cannibalism: “and they never leave a man for dead until they have...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 13–65.
Published: 01 January 2011
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 141–161.
Published: 01 January 2007
... human civilization and cultivation — the “works of men” and the human (meaning Greek) voice (X, 147). He recalls the “hospitality” he received at the hands of the Kyklops Polyphemos, and the giant cannibal Antiphates, in the land of the Laistrygones (X, 200). On the island of Aiaie, he sights...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 147–164.
Published: 01 January 2001
... finger of St. Thomas there —and hence it is a place that is very much akin to the explicitly non- Christian communities of the East where practices of bodily fragmentation and cannibalism are everywhere apparent. No matter where one goes in Mandeville’s Travels...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 183–200.
Published: 01 January 2009
..., observing that the ground scarlet annatto seed that the Indians favored in their drink dyed their lips red. For Oviedo the ruddied lips were too evocative of the ritual cannibalism associated with the Aztecs.11 Nevertheless, chocolate came to win over Spanish palates. Choco- late was slow...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 31–42.
Published: 01 January 2009
... the vines] compared to “amargo fruto” [bitter fruit] (Quevedo, 406; 63 and 404; 16), and “las ponzoñas vedadas a la vida” [poisons pro- hibited to life] (383; 33 – 36). An extension of the gustatory sensation is the poets’ shared obsession with cannibalism, as Zion’s mothers find themselves so...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 59–84.
Published: 01 January 2002
... consist of giants or monsters, they are associated with oth- ers who are, such as the gigantic “Og” (a biblical giant) and “Xaneth [the] three headed.”12 In this account the races of Gog and Magog are described as cannibals who eat “the flesh of human beings and [drink] their blood like water and that...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 345–372.
Published: 01 May 2004
... familiars who feed upon her. The image, we remember, recollects earlier images of familiars feeding and echoes the Duchess’s complaint that “A many hungry guests have fed upon me” (4.2.188). More disturbingly, it elides into the intima- tion that the brothers will engage in cannibalism, yet another...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 201–221.
Published: 01 January 2009
... $24.95. Bartlett, Robert. The Natural and the Supernatural in the Middle Ages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. x, 170 pp.; 14 illus. $85.00, paper $29.99. Cornett / New Books across the Disciplines  215 Blurton, Heather. Cannibalism in High Medieval...