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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 343–374.
Published: 01 May 2002
...Louisa Mackenzie © by Duke University Press 2002 a “Ce ne sont pas des bois”: Poetry, Regionalism, and Loss in the Forest of Ronsard’s Gâtine Louisa...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 609–615.
Published: 01 September 2017
... the book's annotator as John Bois (1561–1644), one of the principal translators of the King James Bible of 1611. The article explains why this and other material pertaining to Bois and the King James Version has previously been overlooked and considers how further evidence might be uncovered in the future...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2006) 36 (1): 3–34.
Published: 01 January 2006
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 331–373.
Published: 01 May 2009
... putti is all the more redolent because it represents boys exercising their newfound masculine aggression. On occasion, adult men too are represented in the act of urinating while standing erect, thereby sig- nifying far more than incidental genre. Urination and essential masculinity...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 445–476.
Published: 01 September 2001
... of submissive faith. In some versions of the Hebrew 3akedah, or the “binding” of Isaac, the boy approaches the altar voluntarily, is sacrificed, and is then immediately revived.7 But in Christian contexts the boy’s death is not imagined. The English mystery plays describe Isaac either as a child...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 579–594.
Published: 01 September 2007
... upon, or objects that bad boys may steal, to illustrate the ways in which we need to teach a sense of the aesthetic, a skill with world and word. The real treasures in the Fables are the bits of knowledge they may teach. As the medieval commentator on Walter of England’s version of the wolf...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 7–31.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of the foreskin. The roots of this literary-­theoretical tradition are located in Paul’s defini- tion of allegoresis, which considers allegory through a preputial analogy that marks a compromise between Jewish circumcision and Greco-­Roman ideals of the foreskin. Saint Augustine, in his story about a boy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 507–560.
Published: 01 September 2001
... is her frame of reference. As the Prioress relates the mur- der of the boy and the casting of his body into the cloacal pit, she interrupts her tale with two exclamationes, one addressed to the Jews—“O cursed folk of Herodes al newe” (574)—and the other addressed to the clergeon himelf: O...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 497–507.
Published: 01 September 2021
... The offstage rituals of early modern behavior sustain dramatic action, where they are often marked in the plays, and sometimes marred in modern performance: kneeling, bowing, curtseying (a professional skill for boy actors), social proxemics (how to approach social superiors, when to take the wall), everything...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
...:   Enter Benedick alone. Benedick: Boy!  [Enter Boy.] Boy: Signior? Benedick: In my chamber-window lies a book, bring it hither to me   in the orchard. Boy: I am here already, sir.   Exit. Benedick: I know that, but I would have thee hence...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (1): 7–30.
Published: 01 January 2009
... earlier during Holy Week they had kidnapped a three-year-old boy, who came to be known as Cristóbal, and had taken him to a cave above La Guardia. There they reenacted Christ’s Passion, vilifying, torturing, and crucifying the child. Their ultimate goal was to use the dead child’s heart, along...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
.... In a series of linked events, a widespread pogrom against Jews was followed by attacks against lepers accused of poisoning wells, accusations in which Jews were also implicated.41 In the initial wave of violence against Jews, instigated in 1320 by a mob of pastoureaux or young boys who had been...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 453–473.
Published: 01 September 2021
... and the markers between them. Local historical and geographical knowledge was passed down in a cross-generational system in which, typically, older men taught boys landmarks, important geographical features, and property limits. 36 Elders often sealed these lessons with enjoyable inducements, such as gifts...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 157–179.
Published: 01 January 2012
... humanist in their character, which meant that they were dominated by the liberal arts of grammar, rhetoric, poetry, history, and moral philosophy. When boys went to grammar school, they were expected to be able to read and write in English. So the first task was to learn Latin, and the lower forms...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
.... For scholars of early modern culture, cross-dressing has equally served as a lodestone, orienting and obfuscating early modern gender difference. These debates have examined early modern cross-dressing as both a historical and theatrical practice, querying how English audiences understood the boy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 397–429.
Published: 01 September 2021
... manuscript Oxford, Bodleian Library, Bodley 264, in a Flemish Romance of Alexander copied and sumptuously illuminated roughly eighty years before the event in Paris. The illustration involves precisely four blind men as does the street performance. 12 In the left half of folio 74v's lower margin, a boy...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 415–435.
Published: 01 September 2017
...? How did individual readers over the course of this period treat and encounter the biblical text — literary figures such as Geof- frey Chaucer or Amelia Lanyer (discussed by Andrew Kraebel and Andrew Fleck), or biblical scholars such as Samuel Ward or John Bois (discussed by Jeffrey Miller...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 121–144.
Published: 01 January 2013
... It explores the making of space through dramatic fantasy given discursive form and material shape by the embodied move- ment of performers, that is, the transvestite spectacle of a boy playing a girl and its animation by the romance trope of a girl dressing as a boy. The play’s spatial...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 487–495.
Published: 01 September 2021
... says, “my lady & I wil daunce in the myre for veri pure ioye” (H4v). One dance common at May games was the morris, which incorporated stock characters such as Friar Tuck and Maid Marian, often played by a crossdressed boy. The dance had notable sexual connotations. A 1577 ecclesiastical court case...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 71–98.
Published: 01 January 2013
... (and probably arrases) for moments of discovery.16 As Frederick Kiefer notes in his thorough catalogue of the use of curtains on the early modern stage, in the Induction to Cynthia’s Rev- els, three boys vie for the right — symbolized by the wearing of a black cloak — to deliver the play’s...