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body of Christ

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 483–501.
Published: 01 September 2022
... as a member in a certain maner in the misticall bodye of hys catholike church, yet for lacke of the spirituall receving by clennes of sp[i]rite, he attayneth not the fruitefull thing of the sacrament . (176, my emphasis) More's decentering of Christ's corporeal body in the Eucharistic scene...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 307–332.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Steven Justice Scholarship has routinely assumed that the many medieval eucharistic miracle stories about hosts witnessed as discernibly the body of Christ — newborn, bloody, crucified, or dismembered — were designed to quell doubts in the doctrine of the Mass with coercive ocular confirmation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 585–615.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Harris / Water and Wood  587 Figure 3. Three-­basin fountain, a half kilometer from the chapel of Saint-Fiacre.­ Author’s photograph. multiple representations of sacred objects such as a chalice, the cross, and the body of Christ. This essay seeks to demonstrate the ways in which the eco...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 219–251.
Published: 01 May 2022
... the measurement of our lord Jesus Christ's body and is obtained from our Lord's precious cross.] Wood substitutes for flesh in a metonomy evident in the Old English Dream of the Rood . On the images in Bodley 177, Takamiya 56, Glazier 39, and Wellcome 632, a heart is strategically positioned...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 585–606.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Note here that it is not the sacrifice of Christ that is made present, but the fruits of that past sacrifice, which are the forgiveness of sins. Although Luther maintains the real presence, he continues on to say that the sacra- ment is effective for sinners “not because of the body and blood...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2019) 49 (1): 57–84.
Published: 01 January 2019
... of terms that do important work in King Lear : “take on,” “take up,” “bear,” “bear with.” These terms are all complexly associated, in late medieval and early modern discourses, with the incarnation of Christ, and with the ritual taking of Christ’s body in the Eucharist. And they are all associated...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 261–280.
Published: 01 May 2003
..., not repeated; the bread and wine signify the true presence of the body of Christ rather than becoming that blood and body under the appearances of bread and wine. Even more fun- damentally, purgatory is not so much transformed as utterly abolished and abandoned as a “fond thing vainly invented.”2...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... that such practices worked to displace fundamental anxieties generated by the “sacramental cannibalism” of the eucharistic feast, in which the body and blood of Christ were fused with those of communicants through the process of ingestion. The medieval counternarrative mythologizing lepers, women, and Jews as would...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (2): 261–300.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Jessica A. Boon For thirteen years, the Clarissan Juana de la Cruz (1481 – 1534) gave public “sermones” during which Christ’s voice was reported to issue from her rapt body, expanding on the biblical record and describing festivities in heaven that feature considerable fluidity in gender...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 281–309.
Published: 01 May 2003
.... —Meister Eckhart1 In the later Middle Ages, Christ’s body changes tense, number, and shape. It is unique, past, and unrepeatable: dead, resurrected, and ascended to where, in the words of the Nicene Creed, it is “of one substance with the Father.” In each performance of the Eucharist, however...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 241–259.
Published: 01 May 2003
... led by the theological virtue of faith and practices whose teleology was incorpo- ration in the mystical body of Christ, the Church. The first discussion of “the Catholic Eucharist” in Practicing New Historicism comes in the introduction. It is invoked as the “closest analogy” to myths about...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 315–337.
Published: 01 May 2016
... membership in the Body of Christ and the former also speaks to collective identity and well-­being. The word “felaw- shyppe” further invokes the language of guilds, and might recall merchant Aristorius’s sponsorship of the Jews’ actions in their mock Passion play. At the same time, Brundich’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 335–367.
Published: 01 May 2013
... happened to rep- resentations of the body of Christ on the stage as English drama transitioned from medieval cycle plays to an institutionalized public theater. Certainly the outright staging of God, Christ, and the sacraments, evident in such medieval dramas as the Quem quaeritis tradition...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 305–334.
Published: 01 May 2007
... Lehigh University Bethlehem, Pennsylvania For as the body is one and hath many members; and all the members of the body, whereas they are many, yet are one body: so also is Christ. . . . Yea, much more those that seem to be the more feeble members of the body are more...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 225–255.
Published: 01 May 2009
... Christ and making him present in the world. In an act of collective imagining, the image of the tree of incarnation enabled these women to believe and act as if their community were united materially in the diversity of creation within the singularity of the body of God. Through the practice...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (2): 341–364.
Published: 01 May 2018
... of intense meditation, Christ “ravysched hir spyryt” on the Friday before Christmas and commanded her to fast “every Sonday” in order to receive his body The Protestant commentators also stressed the special role the prophet played as someone who was prepared by God to receive divine truth...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 271–303.
Published: 01 May 2007
... something else (Christ’s body becomes the new “substance” under the persisting “accidents” of bread and wine). Luther accepted the mystery but insisted that one did not need (and should not desire) a philosophical account of it; he saw transubstantiation as another version of arrogance, an attempt...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 629–651.
Published: 01 September 2016
... where Julian explicitly emphasizes a notion of containment.6 Julian certainly has a “softer” account of the devotional place of the body than that of her European counterparts: after her initial sickness in some sense fails to reach the affective unity with the body of Christ she...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 167–198.
Published: 01 January 2002
... previously, Christ transposed the wounds of his Passion onto the human body of St. Francis, whose body became the support for marks that bore witness to the perfection of his imitation of Christ. The stigmata were, in a way, seals of approval; Dante called them “the final seal.”40 Francis’s body mirrored...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 215–240.
Published: 01 May 2021
... to the mother's spiritual training, encouraging her to “ofte chew hit [the Christ-book] and defie [digest] hit wiþ hot brennynge loue, so þat alle þe uertues of þi soule and of þi bodi be turned fro fleshliche liuinge into Cristes liuinge” (32.12–15). As I argue, however, although the author derives his emphasis...